Parent reviews for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 11+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 11+

Based on 59 reviews

Kids say

age 10+

Based on 161 reviews

age 12+
Too many great characters die. Not for anyone over 12, no more than three stars. Bad movie, but ready for Andor.

This title has:

Great role models
Too much violence
1 person found this helpful.
age 12+

Often Excellent Dark Star Wars entry for Older Audiences

Star Wars has always been a series for not only children, but the child that lives in the heart of adults as well. It's escapism between good people who show their faces and believe in life, and evil people who mask their faces and wish to oppress those that are not among their numbers. It's simple, endearing and satisfying, and not just in a cathartic sense. However, Rogue One is different, and by this I don't mean that it fails - instead, it takes a different approach from the start. This is sort of a lighter version of the era (late 80's through the 90's) when child-friendly entertainment had to receive ultra-mature, gritty and dark reinterpretations so that the fans of the original material could feel like the material itself matured with them. But in almost all of those cases I would say it was just pandering to a crowd that simply wanted some kind of verification that they still enjoy what was once a children's property, but Rogue One instead takes a more sophisticated approach. Not to say that the movie itself is particularly sophisticated, nor am I even saying that the movie is always interesting and engaging. But I will say that its new angle is a good one, and when this movie works, it's genuinely excellent. In terms of just pure critique, I can just point out that the action is very engaging, the characters a bit flat but endearing enough and operate well as cogs in the gears of the story itself, the visuals are outstanding and the performances solid. It was nice to see Donnie Yen used more for acting than for kung-fu, and Ben Mendelsohn was excellent as a villain who isn't evil, but instead prideful and aggressive. And that last part is one of the things that makes me recommend this movie for families of teenagers -- The lessons in this movie are actually very good. The heroes act in a very morally grey area, performing what are sometimes really bad acts of violence in hopes that the ends will justify the means, and in the final act of the movie, the heroes genuinely question if they are right to do this. Heck, one of the main characters continues fighting simply because giving up means that the horrible things he has done was for nothing; he simply couldn't live with himself for the things he has done if it amounted to nothing but sudden acts of violence. And with that, the movie portrays violence in a much more unpleasant light, with almost no survivors and several deaths played as tragedies rather than just the inevitability of action. At times it's actually moving in an almost unpleasant way, but this only makes such things more effective. With that, there is a great element with the villain of the movie, in that he is a villain because he is proud to the point of near-narcissism, and his fate is sealed largely because he demanded he have things his way. On the other side of the spectrum, many of the heroes know that what they are doing, for the greater good, is a suicide mission, and they act with courage in hopes that their sacrifice will help those that come after them. I think that these are great things to teach older children because the single most important lesson in life is that actions have consequences, and that options are always open, but things don't always happen as you hope; sometimes you need to make a stand, sometimes you should leave well enough alone, and sometimes you can do something but maybe should not.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
1 person found this helpful.
age 9+

A Great Movie

Absolutely love all of the Star Wars movies. I enjoy the action, adventure and the odd characters that show up. Strong female leads are fantastic.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 11+
age 10+

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 9+

I think it's ok for 9 me and over though it does have some violence I still think it is ok for 9 and over

awesome watch it with popcorn

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 11+

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
age 11+

Among Star Wars' Best

Rogue One is one of the best Star Wars movies in my opinion. And even though it isn't even one of the main chapters, it still beats many of them anyways. One of the reasons why is because Rogue One cuts out half the cringe and immaturity that can be found in most other Star Wars stories. It it also more action packed and darker than usual. But the best part about it is the ending. The final scenes are the same that are at the beginning of A New Hope. Rogue One achieves all of this while still remaining kid friendly. There is no language, no sex and only some mild violence. I would highly recommend this to Star Wars fans!

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 12+

Intense, dark spin-off is emotionally violent but very entertaining

Suggested MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sequences of violence and action throughout, and some intense images
age 13+

informative

This review of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is good for parents who are concerned about what their kids watch. It's logical and informative on how much violence there is and helpfully compares it to the other Star Wars movies. Although there is violence in this movie, Common Sense reminds parents that sacrifices and casualties are necessary in a war against tyrannical evil. This is certainly true, but perhaps a value that is meant for older children. The review also mentions the good elements in this movie: diversity, good role models, and the importance of virtues like trust, courage, loyalty, and (a key element in this film) hope. In pointing out these virtues, this review tells us that there are elements of the dignity of the human person, of the “truth-filled”, and of the inspiring in this movie. It also talks about the characters and in this way we see that the film is motivated by and relevant to personal experience. One thing it doesn’t mention however is if this movie is skillfully developed or not. Common Sense rates this movie at 11+, which does seem to be a low age for the content they describe in the review. Overall though, the review is a helpful guide for parents to know what is contained in the movie and make a judgment on whether it is appropriate for their kids.