Kid reviews for The Rocketeer

The Rocketeer Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 11+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 10+

Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 11+

Based on 7 reviews

age 8+

my thoughts...

There's more style than substance -- but it's fun if it's gun-heavy action.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
1 person found this helpful.
age 8+
age 18+

Not the best but good

Good movie but not for 7 year olds. A little too violent and scary.

This title has:

Too much violence
Too much swearing
age 11+

So so great

I think this is an AMAZING movie. It is so action packed and really fun. At one point the villain kidnaps a young woman and tries to kiss her and the way he holds her is a little inappropriate for younger kids. Besides that, I thought is was super amazing and really recommend it.

This title has:

Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
age 11+

Fantastic, accurate adaptation... But it is essentially a PG-13 film with a PG rating.

As a younger kid, I wasn't very into super-heroes, but I did love comicbooks about other things, be it robots, detectives, Transformers and G.I. Joe. That is, until I discovered the Rocketeer. The Rocketeer was like a gateway to super hero comics to me, and as I got older, and more in touch with the internet, I discovered that there was a movie based on it. It was very hard to find, however, because it wasn't on Blu-Ray or iTunes, but they eventually added it to iTunes and I saw it. I was about 12. Now, I'm almost 18. I got the Blu-Ray of the film, and recently watched it again, and I have to say that it is a lot more intense than I remember. This film has everything that a young American child could love. It has Hollywood, old-timey gangsters, airplanes, cool special effects, it even has a man who puts on a jetpack and fights Nazis! However, with that being said, if your kid is interested in this film, you really shouldn't let the Disney name or the PG rating fool you. As I mentioned, this film deals a lot with gangsters and Nazi's, and that means guns. A LOT of guns. A really big amount of people get shot on screen, and others die in ways that might be scary to your younger ones. In one particular moment, FBI agents find a friendly character who is said to be dead, and we only see him from the waist up, but a few seconds later, one of the characters refers to the method of murder being something along the lines of 'he's pretty much been folded in half'. Characters are threatened, shot at, and sometimes, even killed in fiery explosions. One of the bad guys is very tall, and he is used like the intimidating muscle of the main villain. Without going into detail, this character does a lot of damage, killing several FBI agents, and one specific character in a torturous way. The language isn't too bad, but it is there. For the most part, it's just hell or damn, but there is one S.O.B. There is one shot of a character's breasts, with a male character claiming to be "double charmed", and there is some kissing. Characters drink in social situations, but it isn't a plot point, and it's pretty much only the bad guys. Now that we've got the objectionable stuff out of the way, let's talk about what this film has going for it. This was one of Disney's attempts to 'rebrand' from being seen as a children's entertainment company to an all around live-action studio. Previous attempts included (but are not limited to) the Black Hole, Tron, and a few others, and this earns it's place amongst them. While there are a few differences from the finer details of the comic, this movie is instantly recognizable as a Rocketeer product, and the spirit of the source material is very much intact. The look, the actors, even the music hit it all out of the park, and this was much needed in a time where comicbook/superhero cinema had been rather constrained by the technology of the time. While the effects don't hold up as well today, they don't look glaringly bad, thanks to a preference in very well timed and used green screen effects, lighting, and set design. It is a precise spectacle, and everything seems handmade in a good way. Joe Johnston (Director of films such as Captain America: The First Avenger, Jumanji, and October Sky) never misses a beat, capturing what set the Rocketeer apart from other comicbook heroes and successfully translating it to the big screen. Billy Campbell is pretty much a perfect fit for the role of the Rocketeer, and James Horner's score is instantly memorable, and is still used today in Disneyland as well as Disney Stores all around the world.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
age 10+

Fun for your kids

If your kids don't mind guns and explosions, they can watch it. There is some swearing, but nothing too bad. Cliff (The Rocketeer) and Jenny do kiss at times, but it's fine and nothing really sexual. It's overall a fun movie that you and your kids will like

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 11+

Highly entertaning, it stands out from lots of Disney films (in a good way)

The Rocketeer is one of those films that should be viewed by EVERYONE. Despite some violence, kissing, cursing, cigars, cigarattes, and shampane, kids will enjoy it. When I turn 21, i'm going to choose NOT to drink. I am a Christian. Also, I HATE smoking. It smells nasty and it messes your lungs up. Anyways, back to my review. The graphics are outstanding and the actors did a great job. Anyways, The Rocketeer gets 5 stars.