Transformers: Dark of the Moon

  • Review Date: June 29, 2011
  • Rated: PG-13
  • Genre: Action/Adventure
  • Release Year: 2011

Common Sense Media says

Slightly better than No. 2 but still crude and very violent.
  • Review Date: June 29, 2011
  • Rated: PG-13
  • Genre: Action/Adventure
  • Release Year: 2011

Age(i)

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17

Quality(i)

 

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Despite the requisite underlying themes of friendship and loyalty, there are a couple of shady messages about what it takes to succeed as a woman (be beautiful and sexy) and a few negative stereotypes and jokes.

Positive role models

Optimus Prime, Bumblebee, and the other Autobots are extremely loyal to Sam and humans in general, even when the government turns against them. Sam also will stop at nothing to help his Autobot friends and to save the love of his life. Other characters are brave, but it's their job to defend the innocent.

Violence

Incessant loud, explosion-based violence, usually featuring the robotic Transformers and human beings. The evil Transformers don't care about collateral human damage, and they routinely cause mass destruction to buildings, bridges, cars, and even national monuments like the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. There's a high body count, even though the camera never lingers on any human death (it does linger on Transformer deaths, including those of sympathetic secondary characters and one that's particularly gruesome). The military (including the Air Force special ops and Navy SEALs) uses technologically advanced weapons and gear to battle the Transformers that are threatening to turn humans into a slave race.

Sex

No outright sex, but every scene Carly is in features her in either underwear (the actress is a famous Victoria's Secret model) or a revealing outfit. She and Sam kiss in bed and several other times. Her entire purpose is to be attractive and have others make comments about her "hotness." Sam's mother makes inappropriate references to sex and even speculates about how "big" he is to have had two gorgeous girlfriends. In one scene, a sexily dressed Latina character is referred to as a "hoochie mama," and her anger is called a "Latin meltdown."

Language

Surprisingly frequent use of the following words: "a--hole," "bitch," "s--t," "hell," "damn," "crap," "ass," "d--khead," and "oh my God." One mouthed "f--k," and one memorably (and humorously) said "clusterf--k."

Consumerism

Not only is the entire series based on Hasbro toys, but there's also an extremely high number of product placements: from cars (General Motors, Mercedes, Corvette, and more) to electronics (Apple computers, iPad, Lenovo desktops) to water (Arrowhead) and apparel (Adidas, Nike, etc.).

Drinking, drugs, & smoking

At a couple of dinner parties, adults are shown briefly with glasses in hand.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that the third installment in the blockbuster Transformers franchise is less crude than the first sequel but more violent than the original. Tween and teen boys in particular will be interested in seeing this movie, but even younger kids who are familiar with the Hasbro toys may be curious about yet another live-action adaptation. Like all of director Michael Bay's films, there's a constant threat to all the characters -- in fact, humanity in general -- and an accompanying body count to match that sense of peril. Some robot deaths are particularly startling. Language is edgy, with frequent uses of "a--hole," "bitch," and "s--t" and two variations on the F-bomb. This is a dream movie for car, weapon, and military aficionados, but not so much for young girls, since the only three women in the film are stereotypes -– the young blond "hottie," the tough older careerist, and the wisecracking middle-aged mom.

Parents say

Kids say

What's the story?

Since the end of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf) has graduated from college, been dumped by his long-term girlfriend, and taken up with another beautiful woman, Carly (Rosie Huntington-Whiteley), despite not having a job. After mysterious Autobot technology is found in Chernobyl, Optimus Prime (voiced by Peter Cullen) leads a mission to the dark side of the moon, where he discovers his predecessor, Sentinel Prime (Leonard Nimoy). Once they've returned to Earth, Optimus revives Sentinel, who's the only Transformer capable of launching a teleportation system he created. Optimus assures the head of national intelligence (Frances McDormand) that Sentinel is trustworthy, but it turns out he's actually aligned with Megatron (Hugo Weaving) and the Decepticons, who plan to use the teleportation bridge to rebuild Cybertron on Earth.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

The target audience for this movie (those with Y chromosomes) probably doesn't care whether it's good or not; they just want their fix of Michael Bay's signature explosions, metal-on-metal battles, and scantily clad damsels in distress. More discerning audiences, however, will be slightly reassured that this installment is better than the awful Revenge of the Fallen; for one, there's less offensive material (although there are still some squicky lines, like when Mrs. Witwicky muses whether her son's got some hidden "skills" that are responsible for him landing two such "world-class hotties" as girlfriends), and secondly, you might not want to leave 20 minutes into the movie.

But just because this "threequel" is mediocre rather than horrible doesn't make it worth two-and-a-half hours of an audience's time. It's laughable (when will screenwriters realize that a woman can't run for her life in stilettos?) and in desperate need of a merciless editor (this isn't an epic like The Lord of the Rings, so there's no need for it to be over two hours). The best part is seeing McDormand and pal John Turturro joke with each other on what was probably the easiest acting job of their careers. Of course, young boys will get a kick out of the Transformer battles, the space-race history lesson, and living vicariously through Sam (whom every male -- human or Transformer -- calls "lucky" for having the babelicious girl on his arm). It's not likely to be the movie of the summer like the original in 2007, but if you've got a teen boy, it's going to be a must-see nonetheless.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the movie's nonstop violence. How does the filmmaker differentiate between Transformer-on-Transformer violence and violence against humans? Do you think the director gets away with depicting more violence because Transformers aren't people?

  • Although there's less stereotyping here than in the previous movie in the series, what are some instances in which characters of a particular gender, ethnic, or racial group are depicted in a stereotypical manner?

  • Despite the number of attractive male characters, why does the movie focus so much more on the leading actress' body? What message does that send audiences?

  • Nearly every scene features a product placement; is this realistic (because people do use particular brands) or is it distracting?

Movie details

Theatrical release date:June 29, 2011
DVD release date:September 30, 2011
Cast:Josh Duhamel, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Shia LaBeouf
Director:Michael Bay
Studio:Paramount Pictures
Genre:Action/Adventure
Run time:154 minutes
MPAA rating:PG-13
MPAA explanation:intense prolonged sequences of sci-fi action violence, mayhem and destruction, and for language, some sexuality and innuendo

This review of Transformers: Dark of the Moon was written by

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  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.
  • OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

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Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging, great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging, good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging, good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging, okay learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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Kid, 12 years old Written bySSMidnight June 29, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

Best movie ever!!!

This movie is the best movie ever. The graphics are amazing. I would not recommend under kids of 10 to see it, because when a transformer dies it looks like blood comes out, the language is pretty rough, there is f-words, s-words, different d-words, a-words, and b-words. Then the sexual stuff is iffy. You see Carly in her underwear and half button-up shirt and she kisses Sam and Carly wears revealing dresses and there are crude and suggestive remarks. But it is a great movie!

What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byDaddyDude June 29, 2011
AGE
18
QUALITY
 

Boycott Hasbro

F bombs in a toy movie? Absolutely wrong. Boycott Hasbro.

Adult Written byTodd Keefe June 29, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

Very good movie in my opinion.

Now I saw this movie tonight with my younger brother. He's 13 years old and yes the movie DOES Use some forms of language. But I don't think it focuses as much on the lead actress' body as the review says. Yes there's a few provocative scenes but her clothing from about an hour and on is not as bad as it seems. Prime, Bumblebee, Sideswipe and just about all the Autobot's provide positive role models. The violence is quite a bit and yes quite a few humans die in the decepticon take over. Any child over 13 will be good for this mostly because of being able to distinguish right from wrong and understand the message that no matter how dark the times may become, that you should always have hope and faith in not only those that fight with you but yourself as well. Don't entirely believe what major reviewers say about this movie. There is quite a bit of character development in it's own way. As I have said now a days, no matter how hard someone tries they can never please everyone so before you draw your conclusions from my own review or those of others see it for yourself and draw your own conclusion as you never know you may miss out on something you might like a lot. Note that if you happen to enjoy some of the characters of the autobots that some do die.

What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence

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