Parent and Kid Reviews on

Wish

Wish Movie Poster: Asha, wearing a purple dress, raises her hand dramatically toward the sky, while Magnifico looms over her
Our Review
age 6+

Based on 14 parent reviews

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age 5+

Technically Beautiful, Narratively Bankrupt. A Major Disappointment

From a pure craft standpoint, Wish is gorgeous. The animation, production design, vocal performances, editing, visual effects, et al are top notch. no complaints there (beyond the intentionally muted color palette of the early portion of the film crossing the line into even more drab than the story called for.) But from a story standpoint, the film feels like they went straight into production on the first draft of the screenplay. Which is to say that narratively the film is a complete mess that either can't seem to ever settle on what it wants to be about, or else can't figure out how to convey that story in a thematically coherent, intelligible way. As just one of many examples of this muddle, the rules of the world are bizarre, overly complex, illogical, counter intuitive in the worst way, and almost impossible to follow or make sense of. People immigrate to a kingdom so they can have their most important wishes removed from their memories at age 18 all for the infinitesimally small chance that the kingdom’s ruler will grant that wish to them at some point before they die? What? Huh? In what universe does that make narrative sense on any level? Who on earth would that “deal” appeal to? This is fantasy world building of the laziest, sloppiest, worst kind. The kind that just makes up the rules as it goes along and then keeps changing them to suit the needs of the story without any regard to logic or internal consistency. Is it possible that the writer’s strike meant the studio just plowed ahead without the necessary revisions to get the world and the story to work? Based on all of the references to classic Disney films and characters laced throughout the film and credits, the filmmakers appear to believe they have made a major meta-statement on the entire Disney catalogue and legacy. But if they have, it was lost on me. I spent the entire time trying to figure out what the darned picture was trying to be about. Most importantly of all, I was never moved emotionally. Not even a teensy tiny bit. What a waste of talent and resources. Wish is pretty, but dead on arrival.
3 people found this helpful.
age 10+

Feminist Disney tries to remove a despot

I personally loved the movie, but it would have been a wholly different film if the directors made the “wish granting ceremony” happen when Rosas citizens were 16 rather than 18. Main point: If you’re trying to make a dystopian movie, then stick to it! Otherwise, audience members will come away feeling confused as to whether Asha is merely brave or needlessly annoying.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
2 people found this helpful.
age 2+

NOT GOOD AT ALL

worse movie ever! weakest animation I’ve ever seen

1 person found this helpful.
age 8+

Wishful the Message Hits

I was cocncerned not “previewing” this movie before taking my daughters to see it. They’re 5 and 7. Needless to say, I was pleasantly surprised with this movie. Asha is a young, not yet 18 year old teen, who is respectful of her nearly 100 grandfather and her mother. There isn’t a father in the movie. Asha has a strong friend group that she visits prior to having the opportunity to interview to be an apprentice to the towns king. The king takes favor in Asha and in doing so shows her the towns wishes. He then explains that he “manages” the wishes and grants them as he sees fit and most of them will never be granted. Then they show the towns people as they “give” their wishes to the king and it’s almost like they are giving away their hearts — they lose their shine and happiness. They all seem robotic and just sad. The concerns I have about this movie are the king is very manipulative and then shifts to becoming very evil. It’s obvious when he shifts and he is depicted having green eyes and green powers. I interpreted the message to be that it’s so important to not place your wishes and dreams into someone else’s control. They are yours and yours to achieve with the help of family and friends! The other message is that when there is someone doing something wrong, fight against it as much and hard as you can. And as a bystander seeing the injustice or wrongs, don’t let one person do all the fighting — it will take a village/town to make change — help! Raise your voice.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
1 person found this helpful.
age 6+

Great Film!

Great Movie! Wish brings Disney magic, old and new, and makes a great film out of it. Some violence, but it’s really appropriate. Perfect celebration for Disney100!

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
1 person found this helpful.
age 5+

Disney is running out of ideas!

Terrible movie, but not nearly as bad as Encanto.
1 person found this helpful.
age 5+

I thought the movie was sweet with great songs. My kids (6 and 8) enjoyed. Great family movie.
age 6+

This title has:

Too much violence
age 5+

enjoyable

6 year old and I liked it, it would have been too scary for my 3 year old who is not a fan of peril or villains

This title has:

Great messages
age 6+

Enjoyable movie safe for primary age.

Good movie with some catchy tunes. Both boys (ages 6 and 10) enjoyed and want to see it again. Nothing as a parent, I’m concerned about. It initiated some good conversations about what can happen when good people become too focused on one thing and standing up for what you believe is right. The “bad guy” in the film is the king who protects the towns wishes with all the best intentions, but when he senses someone else has the power to control wishes, he becomes bent on being the most powerful. Also brought about some deep discussion regarding cosmic dust and origins of the universe and the special magic that connects us all. Religious folks will no doubtedly interpret this as their god connecting all living things, but non religious folks can take it at face value. The power of self belief connecting us all is a universal theme.