Parent reviews for Lego Masters

Lego Masters Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 9+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 9+

Based on 11 reviews

Kids say

age 8+

Based on 10 reviews

age 12+

Good, but I still won't let my kids watch it

I intially liked this show because my 11 yr old and 8 yr old REALLY love Legos. However, the competitors often use language that I do not approve. Examples include "hell", "ass" and "damn" if I'm remembering correctly. Subsequently, my age group rating on this is 12+.

This title has:

Too much swearing
1 person found this helpful.
age 10+

Too Much Cursing

One bleeped “s--t,” and instances of “damn,” and “hell.” One person says “go to hell,” in season three. Some funny smack talking and a “what the freak?” Otherwise, fun show for 10+ for waaaaaay too many curse words and the use of God’s name in vain.

This title has:

Too much swearing
age 10+

Too Much Cursing

One bleeped “s--t,” and instances of “damn,” and “hell.” One person says “go to hell,” in season three. Some funny smack talking and a “what the freak?” Otherwise, fun show for 10+ for waaaaaay too many curse words and the use of God’s name in vain.

This title has:

Too much swearing
age 4+

This title has:

Educational value
Too much consumerism
age 7+

ARE YOU KIDDING ME!

Not only did the wrong team get selected twice, but these judges act like they are gods. The contestants work hard and the judges demean their work, and although I understand they have to give constructive criticism, they are just flat out rude. When Christian and Aaron left, this definitely discouraged me to stop watching the show. Not trying to be a hater but Will Arnett is the only reason why I even bother watching the show now. I hope they choose the deserving winner at the end of this and if they don't, you will be seeing another negative comment.
age 9+
My son loves this show and would to see you guys do an episode on building transformers!!!
age 5+

Refreshingly clean

In a world where a lot reality tv is date and sex based, Lego Masters is a great cleanse and very family friendly. There is the occasional drama but it is mild. There isn't any vulgar language and everything is appropriate.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 5+

Good, fun show

We've been watching this with our nearly 5 year old, and 7 year old sons. This is a good, fun show, and each week our boys can't wait to see what happens next. They are inspired by the creations, and have started playing 'lego masters' at home; coming up with an idea and then setting about building it. The show doesn't focus on the contestants and their relationships any more than any other competitive show, just enough to let you know their thought process and the struggles they have with each challenge. It is a show about LEGO, however, it doesn't watch like a constant commercial. It's a competition that happens to be based around lego.
age 11+

Bad Judgements

The twists and judging criteria make the episodes hard to watch. There seems to be harder judgements toward the stronger builders. Buildings that would be amazing are criticized for minor details when the worse builders use castle bland pieces exactly how any builder could use them. How does a hot dog stand that any kid could build beat a skyscraper with a huge monster in a city building challenge? There may be some other attributes of the builders that are being selected instead of the quality of work. The host, Will Arnett, does an excellent job and makes the shows funny and interesting, at this point the only reason to keep watching the episodes.
age 9+

A bit cringeworthy at times, but all in all highly entertaining and safe family fun.

It's great to see a show focused around artists on mainstream television. That being said, often times it feels like they cherry picked Lego fans to find overly quirky and socially awkward personalities rather than trying to find sheer skill alone. I understand the need for this, but some people might not. There are plenty of very average people who are master builders, and plenty who are over the top, but the focus on wild personalities doesn't always guarantee entertaining tv. It is great to show the importance of teamwork as well as learning conflict resolution with a partner, and the importance of not using put-downs lightly, which has become an issue for Sam and Jessica. But sometimes it feels like some of the relationships depicted are constructed for reality tv style moments. This could be a great time to talk to your kids about "spin" with reality television and competitions. How do producers make us root for "the hero" and "the villain" in the real world? All in all, safe for the family for the most part, and lots of fun.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much consumerism