Parent reviews for Tinga Tinga Tales

Tinga Tinga Tales Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 4+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 4+

Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

age 5+

Based on 1 review

age 4+

The best

The best show I ever seen and so fun tales
1 person found this helpful.
age 5+

The best

1 person found this helpful.
age 2+

A Show Definitely Worth Your And Your Childs Time!

Tinga Tinga is a very colorful show with very good music. Every story has a moral to it. So not only does it draw your child in but it teaches your child as well. I decided to write a review after watching this show with my son for a while and both of us loving it. I especially wanted to write this review after reading the 2 not very truthful or satisfying reviews. The child that reviewed this show is 9 years old. This show is for kids about 4 years old (I believe probably 2-6 years actually) So of course a 9 year old would find it boring. The adult that wrote a review stating how terrible the show is for your child to watch clearly only seen bits and pieces of the one episode they complained about. This is a great show. Creativity and Morales are 2 things your child needs to learn and this show helps them with that.

This title has:

Great messages
1 person found this helpful.
age 2+
Very bright and colorful take on favorite animals. The artwork is simple but charming. It's humorous as well. The songs are soulful and catchy. Teaches kids a few Swahili words here and there. Educational to learn a bit about African folklore. It also teaches kids team work, telling the truth, being happy with who they are, not being selfish, patience, etc, as well as consequences for bad behavior. Older kids and adults may also enjoy.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
age 4+

A Serious concern

The concept is great, the colours, characters and music excellent. HOWEVER I have great reservations about the messaging and stories. 4 episodes in and I see it as an adult dark comedy. Each episode is meant to have a story and moral about each animal. Here’s my issue. The bat who misbehaves was broken and emotional scarred for life by the other animals . To the extent he no longer comes out of his cave In the day and can’t see. The tortoise and hare remake. Showed the tortoise continually winning by cheating and then permanently injuring the hare for life, by placing thorns in its way - he was credited for this. It’s okay to win at all costs including crippling someone for life. I was suspicious of the porcupine story but persisted, no surprise there. The porcupine had a wonderful soft coat, which was stolen by the Jackal, while sleeping, and injuring It by making it sleep in a bed of biting ants. This became a permanent skin condition. Ironically they quoted throughout “I want, doesn’t get” but in the end the Jackal gets the softest most luxurious coat with no consequence. Jokes aside, I am AFRICAN and I’m appalled at this representation of stories. Our stories are always full of real morals that transcend age. This sends a very bad message to young children.
age 4+

Disney Junior usually has hits, but this is a miss.

At first glance, the show seems pretty cute. But some of the messages are either intentionally bad or just maybe not well-thought out. In the specific case of "Why the Hare Hops", the illustration given is a race between the tortoise and the hare. Instead of winning the race by hard work, the tortoise beats the hare over and over again by taking shortcuts and by sabotaging the hare by scattering thorns across the road for the hare to run over. The hare actually runs over the thorns and hurts his feet but there are no consequences for the tortoise. At the end of the episode, we are 'spoonfed' the message that "You don't have to win by being the fastest, you can just be 'clever'." Is this really the type of message we want to send to our kids- that cheating is okay and that if we're the underdog, we can hurt others and cut corners to win? We have watched about half a dozen episodes and I have mixed feelings after each one. To be on the safe side, we won't be watching the show again.