Feed That Dragon

Common Sense Media says

Fun puzzler will soon frustrate if you don't buy solutions.

Age(i)

2
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5
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9
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12
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17

Quality(i)

 

What parents need to know

Ease of play

The concept of Feed That Dragon is similar to many physics puzzler games, a la Angry Birds, so kids who have played similar games will likely pick up this game quickly. Even so, there are some differences and some elements (needing to place the board exactly right) that make this game -- especially as the levels reach into the high teens and 20s -- not as easy to play as some. The ability to use solutions (or the need to buy solutions) can either help ease of play or make it more difficult, depending upon if you're willing to pay for the solutions.

Violence & scariness

Some levels require players to lob bombs into the dragon's mouth after which the dragon breathes fire.

Sexy stuff
Not applicable
Language
Not applicable
Consumerism

If a player is stuck on a level, there's the option to buy solutions -- $1.99 for five or $7.99 for them all. The first few solutions are free. At certain levels, it may be very difficult for kids to solve the puzzle without buying a solution. The "News" page that pops up over the main menu screen advertises new games from the developer, with a "Get It Now" tab that takes players to the App Store. A "More Games" tab always appears on the main screen.

Drinking, drugs, & smoking
Not applicable
Privacy & safety

Users can opt in to Game Center to track achievements. Players can send and receive friend requests using an email address or Game Center nickname, revealing the first and last name associated with each party's Apple ID and, in the case of email requests, the sender's email address. With Game Center on iOS 5, players can opt to have a private or public profile, which can include a photo. With a public profile, your real name is visible to all other players, and Game Center will recommend you to other players using your real name. With a private profile, only your friends can see your real name, and Game Center will not recommend you to other players.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Feed That Dragon challenges kids to "deliver meals" to a chained dragon by shooting the objects -- fire bombs, donuts, etc. -- to the dragon by moving a series of boards into certain positions so items bounce off them on their way. This requires some forethought, strategy, and logic, while still being fun. Quite a few of the beginning levels of the game are just challenging enough to require thought, while still remaining solvable. But as you get to higher levels, the optional solutions will likely be needed by many players in order to achieve the right trajectory. Some solutions are free, but then players need to pay for later ones. Players don't have to pay to unlock other areas of the game, but you do have to complete the previous area to advance, which may very well mean the purchase of solutions.

Parents say

Kids say

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QUALITY
 

It can be a lot of fun to set up this game and see where the food flies in FEED THAT DRAGON -- hopefully to the happy, puppy-like dragon. But as the game progresses the puzzle solutions become so maddeningly specific that many players will need to use the solutions provided by the game itself, first for free and later for a fee. Younger kids especially may quickly get too frustrated to enjoy the fun graphics and truly thought-provoking elements of this game. In the end, how much fun a player will have with this app essentially comes down to how many levels do you want to progress, how many times are you willing to keep trying, and are you willing to pay for solutions?

App details

Devices:iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad
Price:$.99
Release date:January 16, 2012
Category:Kids Games
Topics:Fairy tales
Size:18.80 MB
Publisher:Miniclip
Version:1.0.1
Minimum software requirements:iOS 3.2 or later

This review of Feed That Dragon was written by

About our rating system

  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.
  • OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

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Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging, great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging, good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging, good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging, okay learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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What parents and kids say

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Educator and Parent of a 8 and 12 year old Written bygoldwhite June 18, 2012
AGE
4
QUALITY
 
LEARNING

Best game ever!

Helps with puzzle skills and physics

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