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The Sims FreePlay

App review by
Mark Raby, Common Sense Media
The Sims FreePlay App Poster Image
Freemium sim both enjoyable and playable without spending.
Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 32 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 91 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about basic human needs from a somewhat simplistic viewpoint. Sim needs don't correspond exactly to scientific definitions of human need, but they're close. Teens can learn about working to nurture relationships as well as taking care of themselves. Simoleons (sim bucks), experience, and life point balances also help teens understand a little about living within one's means. The Sims FreePlay is a fun simulation that can introduce teens to the basics of day-to-day living, but it doesn't provide in-depth life lessons.

Ease of Play

While this game looks and feels a lot like the more sophisticated Sims games on the PC or consoles, it does strip away some of the more complex factors. For example, career ladders are less intensive, making it easier to climb to the top of a profession. There is also no option to have a child, meaning players will never have to deal with that added component. Nevertheless, players will need to have a firm grasp on time management and be able to juggle many tasks at the same time, taking this game slightly out of the realm of intently casual apps.

Violence

Among the many different social interactions that two or more Sims characters can have, it is possible to get into fist fights. Sims may also face violent hazards like fires and starvation, which can lead to death. While these actions are possible, they are never encouraged or rewarded.

Sex

As part of the realistic representation of real life, this game allows players to form relationships with other Sims characters. If players foster a relationship well enough, they will eventually earn the ability to have sex (called "woohoo!" in the game). This is presented as two Sims characters getting in the same bed. There is no graphic depiction of sexual activity, but it is heavily implied.

Language
Consumerism

Success in this game is measured, in part, by how big a player's house is and how expensive the contents inside the house are. This is also a "freemium" game, which means that although it is free to download, players are encouraged to buy in-game items with real money.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Sims FreePlay is "freemium" app that is free to download and play, but offers players many opportunities to buy in-game content. Even without spending a dime, though, this is a full Sims game, complete with house-building, job hunting, and relationships. Two Sims characters can have sex, though it is referred to in the game as "woohoo!" and contains no graphic depictions. Sims characters can also fight one another. Players should note the large file size before downloading. Players can share high scores via the Game Center social network, but participation is optional.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byPanzerMark January 25, 2012

Fine.

This is just fine for kids 10 and up. I mean, be realistic, they're going to eventually break if you can't let them have something as harmless like th...
Adult Written byolivergamereviews December 14, 2014

The sims freeplay

This is a good game for 9 and up's, I do think this game is sort of kid friendly, This game could be better. I've only been playing this game for a da... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old July 18, 2013

THE GROSSIEST GAME THERE IS FOR 10 -12 YEAR OLDS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It is so inappropriate that me a girl that is almost 11 had to delete it because when your sims are engaged they can woohoo (sim sex) and the game is always tri... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old January 14, 2015

Laziest developers

The developers are so lazy and greedy: A part of the arcade is buyable with 1,000 Lifestyle Points (in-game cash) while 1,000 Lifestyle points is buyable for $4... Continue reading

What's it about?

Players choose from a relatively narrow list of personalities to create their Sim, then launch into a series of well-guided goals to earn simoleons, life and experience points, and increase the value of their town. Sims have six basic needs: hunger, bladder, energy, hygiene, social, and fun. To develop “highly inspired” sims, players must meet these needs. The app gives players free simoleons to buy basic things (toilets), but there are numerous opportunities to buy more with real money.

Is it any good?

THE SIMS FREEPLAY is a great transition of the ever-popular Sims franchise to the portable world of mobile devices. It is a "freemium" app, which usually means players need to pour in a lot of real money after they've become hooked, but this game actually provides a vast, expansive experience for players without needing to spend a single penny. Although it is only a fraction of the size of its high-end PC game counterparts, this app manages to capture the same level of endless features and options for which the series has become so renowned. The touch-screen control takes a bit of getting used to and the responsiveness is not always perfect, but as far as apps that players can really sink their teeth into, this one ranks at just about the very top.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Help your kids research basic human needs. How does our environment change what we need to survive? What do we need to live in the desert? The Arctic? On the moon?

  • If your kids enjoy creating sim cities, introduce them to the fields of architecture or civic planning.

App details

For kids who love simulation apps

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