All member reviews for After Tupac and D Foster

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  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
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Quality

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
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Common Sense Media says

Three girls grow up together in the inner city.

Age(i)

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Quality(i)

 

Users say

(out of 8 reviews)
AGE
11
QUALITY
 
Review this title!
Parent of a 10 year old Written byMama-N-Fl September 4, 2009
AGE
11
QUALITY
 

Not what I want my kids reading

Not so good. I thought it was very hard to understand because of the bad grammer used throught out the book and it is most definately NOT a good book for eleven or twelve year olds due to adult subject matter. Two thumbs down on this one.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 17 years old Written byusername January 28, 2009
AGE
2
QUALITY
 

i love tupac

cool i fina read it
Kid, 12 years old April 10, 2012
AGE
8
QUALITY
 

the best

this is a great book for any age who read over a 5th grade reading level.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 16 years old Written bybillhashairyarmpits January 22, 2012
AGE
18
QUALITY
 

disapointing

sex should not be mentioned although it is fun
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 13 years old Written byTinkerboo618 January 6, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

My thought about the book After tupac & D Foster

I love this book because i use to listen to tupac wit my dad and i remeber my father telling me he died but i think is good for me to read because i'm there age and i know a little bit how they feel because i feel sometime i have no parent to help me but if i look back my ma and dad give me the freedom i need as my age so i understand this book really well but i think it bit be a good book for 11 year olds if they are not mature then don't let them read it because if you live in the southside or where ever i think it would be a good book i really was interested in so i hope if you look at what i thought about this book that you can take my word for it so i know some people takes my word so yea that's what i think about my book.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Parent of a 9 year old Written byjmoore106 September 9, 2010
AGE
9
QUALITY
 

I just want to let our kids no ahead of time

i think that this book is very age approaite.you should let kids read these book because you want to let them know before they get older and get themselves into something in big trouble.im sorry for you other people that dont agree with me but is just the way i feel.i fell lyke the age 9 and up is the right age to let our kids know that as you get older you are going to go through some things and that you are not going to make the right decsion all the time but try to make that decsion most of the time.thats all im trying to sat=y too our kids..
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Parent of a 15 and 17 year old Written byPNW TeacherMom July 3, 2010
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

Friendship Triumphs Poverty

A great friendship book about some African-American tween-aged girls. Sometimes a bit gritty (prison, homosexuality, gangs, foster kids, shooting) the book is very informative and touching.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written byJustone December 21, 2008
AGE
11
QUALITY
 

This Book Should Win the Newbery medal...

After Tupac and D Foster After Tupac and D Foster has such strong stands about friendship, trouble, and an awe-inspiring performer whose legend only seems to grow. There is such a quiet beauty to the way this story is told through the voice of a girl growing up with a passion for friends, for family, and for music. The story of Tupac Shakur, both his life and death, helps tell the story of three girls living lives that are at times both rough and happy. The music becomes a character all its own, as does Tupac himself. After Tupac and D Foster is most deserving of the Newbery medal because of its age range, well-defined characters, and it’s developed plot. For these reasons are so strong that I’m surprised it’s being compared to lower level books that will not even stand a chance in the running if they are compared to this novel. The age range for this book is very unique. The girls are eleven and maybe twelve by the end of the story. But the writing is definitely from an adult, or a VERY intelligent teens perspective, looking back at that time frame. The girls also have to deal with issues that your average everyday teen book isn't considering. Things like having your best friend's brother in jail for a crime he never committed. It is also so deeply related Then again, nothing in this book is inappropriate for ten and eleven-year-olds either. There is such a beauty to the way this story is told through the voice of a girl growing up with a passion for friends, for family, and for music. The characters are so tightly nailed to the story, they are so strong and forward with their thoughts about their lives. The story of Tupac Shakur, both his life and death, helps tell the story of three girls living lives that are at times both rough and happy, because of the choices he made. The music becomes a character all its own, just like does Tupac. D Foster was a girl with a very daring personality. She came walking sown the street and said that she had gotten off of the bus because she liked the trees. She had that kind of daring personality. The girls then meet in the neighborhood in Queens. They are all eleven-years-old and have all moved from house to house. The three become friends almost instantly, and through the course of their friendship they try to deal the everyday realities of family, their love of Tupac, and the future as it arrives. They have so much in common, except the unnamed narrator and Neeka very quickly learn that D Foster has something that they don’t have, freedom. D Foster just wants to stay in one home from now on, but when her real mom gets her act together and wants her back, the closeness of the girls is tested in ways that are not even imaginable. The age range for this book is very unique. The girls are eleven and maybe twelve by the end of the story. But the writing is definitely from an adult, or a VERY intelligent teens perspective looking back at that time. The girls also have to deal with issues that your average everyday teen book isn't considering. Things like having your best friend's brother in jail for a crime he never committed. It is also so deeply related Then again, nothing in this book is inappropriate for ten and eleven-year-olds either. In After Tupac and D Foster, the plot is very well brought together. It is a strong story about friends, keeping them, losing them, and how can never really know what's going on in another person's mind. Set in Queens in the mid 90’s, After Tupac and D Foster is the story of three girls--“Three the Hard Way”. It’s a moment in time when the nameless narrator and her childhood best friend, Neeka, meet D Foster. A mysterious, slightly older girl, who’s latest foster mother let’s her “roam” so long as D meets curfew. A freedom the narrator and Neeka have never known under the watchful eyes of their mothers, restricted by the geography of the block they live on. The girls bond over their mutual love of Tupac Shakur and his music. D especially, feels a connection to him. Over about two-year period D becomes a fixture on the block and in the girls’ lives just as Tupac is a fixture in the media and therefore their radar. When it comes down to it, Jacqueline Woodson has packed a lot of tough topics into this airtight little story: throwaway kids, jail visits, homosexuality, Tupac’s art, fatherless ness, and the hope some kids cling to that they might one day be With so many big issues in mixed in with that. It’s amazing how smooth the story flows. ByAddie