Parents say

(out of 6 reviews)
age 14+
Review this title!
Parent of a 2 year old Written byredheadheroines May 12, 2011

Great for older teens!

I absolutely LOVED Fire by Kristin Cashore. This book has it all, action, adventure, fantasy, romance, mystery. However, there are several things that parents should be aware of. In the book, the heroine, Fire, has casual sexual relations with one of the other characters. There are several mentions of rape and molestation, not graphic, but frequent enough to be mentioned. There is senseless violence towards animals and humans in the novel as well. However, on all counts, I would give the severity of each count a 6-7 rating out of 10. Not too much, but enough to be noticed. I hope that helps!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written byT4 Mom May 15, 2015

Engaging, but look for hidden messages on sex and violence.

This is the first book in a series, it's quite engaging, and if you child likes it, they will want to read all three. However, you'll want to read it, too, as there is quite a bit that you'll want to talk to you child about. The series contains a lot of violence--from fighting, wars, and torture (of animals, and in later books, of people). This is handled mostly pretty well, but it bears pointing out (spoiler alert) that the protagonist is a hired thug to rough-up or kill others (although she has a conscience about it). There are mentions of rapes, visions of torture and murder, etc. in the series (particularly the last one, "Bitterblue")--all in all, pretty grim. The part that bothered me in general is that in all the books in the trilogy, there is the general message that sex is a casual thing between friends (particularly prevalent in "Graceling", the second book, where two characters get together just to "hook-up"). One can admire that there are many references to taking an herb to avoid pregnancy (some notion of "safe sex"), but as this is in a fantasy land, there are apparently no sexually-transmitted diseases, so no concern over that. In general, the not-so-subtle take-home message from the books in the series is that sex feels good and is fine between friends so long as you do something not to get pregnant, which isn't something I'd want my kids reading without talking to them about it. Unlike some reviewers, I don't subscribe to the notion that just because kids today are barraged with sex and violence in the media, that it's appropriate for them. I would not recommend this series to those under 13. (If they were made into movies, they would definitely get at least a PG-13, based on violence and sex.)
Parent Written byMy Kid's Mom November 10, 2011

Very loose morality

The sex in this book is appalling. It is debase and inappropriate for kids of ANY age. It was truly a disappointment because Graceling was a good read, despite the two inappropriate lines that my 11 year old would not understand anyway, at least I hope he wouldn't. It is also written in such a way that it sounds "okay" to behave so poorly and make such poor choices. I have never written a book review before, but felt compelled to do so due to the lack of any morality in this book. My kid's Mom
What other families should know
Too much sex
Adult Written byTomato-Face April 18, 2011

Feminism overdone

I find this story rather predictable, for she always got her way and I think there is too much fuss over the whole 'beauty is a curse' ordeal as well as useless guards and nearly all the men characters are flat. This story is simply a remake of Graceling. I am disappointed at how the authoress doesn't really get into detail about the big bad of Graceling. She simply said 'oh hes bad' for no apparent reason.
Parent of a 14 year old Written byHoohooo March 29, 2011

Great for mature subjects

Its a really good book.
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Educational value
Parent of a 6 year old Written bymadsmooney1214 September 5, 2012

fire

Families can talk about fantasy violence versus realistic violence. How do they impact you differently? Why do you think that is? This book is marketed as Young Adult, but it will attract adult readers as well. Why do you think the publisher decided to market it to teens? What separates Young Adult from children's or adult literature? And, just for fun: Fire can control minds, a common ability in fantasy and science fiction. What other supernatural powers are common in these types of works? What ability would you most like to have?
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex