The Giver, Book 1

Book review by Barbara Schultz, Common Sense Media
The Giver, Book 1 Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 11+

Riveting, expertly crafted novel shows utopia's flaws.

Parents say

age 12+

Based on 135 reviews

Kids say

age 11+

Based on 410 reviews

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The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Community Reviews

age 11+

A book every Young teen should read

The irony of some or the parents comments is not lost on me. The whole idea of the Giver is to let people experience life and make their own judgements of right and wrong. The book does not encourage infanticide. Sorry to burst your bubble, but your 11 year old will be able to relate to wanting to take a bath with the opposite sex. These are important concepts, and this book was crucial developing my understanding of the world when I read it in middle school. Its so ironic that the very ideas the author presents that the society deems “dangerous” are the same ones parents today want banned from their child’s mind. I highly encourage parents to give this book to their kids at 11-12. I will be doing so to mine one day.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
2 people found this helpful.
age 11+

For Intellectuals and Free-Thinkers ONLY

I'm not sure whether to laugh or cry at anyone being incensed and outraged by this book for a middle-school-aged kid. If you think it's promoting the horrors of this dystopian society, then you clearly missed the point! I'm all for exposing my child to literature that teaches him how people should not behave, as well as how they should. And he has a wonderful sense of right and wrong. This book is very obviously an example (I think a wonderful example), of how we should not behave. And I think it's a lesson in opening one's eyes and looking at what is going on around them, instead of just blindly buying into what is being pushed by others. That's an important lesson, especially at this age. Everyone should be taught that art has a deeper meaning than what is read or seen at face value. I mean, we grew up with Soylent Green, and I must say, I don't know anyone personally who watched that and started thinking it was okay to use people as food. We did, however, learn that deception can be a powerful weapon, and not everything is as it seems...

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
1 person found this helpful.

Book Details

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