All parent member reviews for Twilight: The Twilight Saga, Book 1

Parents say

(out of 152 reviews)
age 13+
Review this title!
Adult Written byLAS_TheBoss December 16, 2015

Love it !

Twilight is the story of Edward and Bella's vampire slash human love story . Bella is a normal teenage girl living in forks with her dad going to high school making friends and well that's where she meets Edward and the rest of the Cullen's . Everything in the book basically is being told by Bella so it's basically her story making the reader see or hear what she says throughout the story and well at the end Bella. And Edward are in love they live happily ever after, the end .... I wish but no Bella and Edward kind of go through obstacles to be together which I think is cute . If you haven't read the book yet I would TOTALLY recommend this book.it is cute and vamptastic.love it And all the characters will be revealed and the true love story as well Only of u read the book ; )
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written bylizwinn March 12, 2015
Seventeen-year-old Bella, an Arizona native, is not looking forward to living with her father in wet, rainy Forks, Washington. Her situation improves, however, when she meets classmate Edward Cullen, a quiet, gorgeous young vampire masquerading as a mortal high school student. His family is a coven of “vegetarian” vampires, those who struggle against the natural urge of seeking humans as prey, choosing to feed on animal blood instead. But when a coven of bad vampires blows into town and selects Bella as their next victim, can Edward protect her, despite being tempted himself? Although the book makes a nice emphasis on the importance of love over lust, it is by no means flawless. One of the key problems is characterization. Bella is the epitome of the “Mary Sue” stereotype (despite being plain, clumsy, and otherwise undesirable, she still manages to attract the attention of the hottest guy in the room). The immortal Edward is all that teen girls have come to expect in the vampire paramour of their dreams: gorgeous, brooding, prone to sudden mood-swings, and god-like (though for all his physical perfection, as some may argue, he certainly isn’t very interesting). Although the novel suffers from Meyer’s amateur writing style, the story itself isn’t all that bad. Edward’s dramatic struggle to keep his mortal sweetheart safe from the baddies (and himself) is endearing, though less sentimental readers may find his declarations of eternal love little more than gag-worthy. It’s a sweet, angst-ridden tale that most mainstream females will be able to relate to. Recommended for Ages 15-Up.
Adult Written byAllCanadianGirl February 19, 2015

ITS S--T!!!!!!!!!

Adult Written byN.Kindred January 21, 2015
Slow, dull, and nearly plotless.
Parent Written bySaraColorado July 21, 2014
Parent Written byfnigiicgqrr c4 g September 17, 2013

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What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Educator and Parent Written bySTUDENT eDUCATION May 13, 2013

NO

IT IS NOT FOR KIDS AT ALL!!!! TOO MUCH INAPROPRIATE INTERACTIONS!!!
What other families should know
Too much sex
Educator and Parent Written bynekokitten May 12, 2013

Twilight's Terrible Message Wise

Bella Swan is far from being a good role model. She has no respect for her parents, pretty much thinks she's smarter then the adults out there and moons over a boy because he's the cutest thing she's ever seen. Younger readers may think that Edward is the perfect boyfriend as well despite the fact he's already trying to tell Bella what she can or can't do. It's brushed off by the idea that he's a vampire and thus knows what is best for her, completely forgetting that there are certain things that an individual person can only know for themselves as well as certain things that you have to learn by trial and error. Also while Bella does get to choose to do stuff like cleaning, she's not really one equal grounds with Edward or any of the other males she interacts with.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much consumerism
Parent of a 10 and 12 year old Written byLupak January 29, 2013

So bad

The worst book in the world
What other families should know
Too much sex
Parent Written byLisa Smith October 4, 2012

Awesome book!

This book is really great! My 9 year old daughter loved it, so I decided to read it and thought it was great!
Parent Written byHarryPotterHead7777 July 30, 2012

WORST.BOOK.EVER!!!

Bella teaches us overall that women are nothing without men that women are weak and would be depressed without a boyfriend or anything. It shows the opposite of what women are. And Edward is a sparkling pixie.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written bycodirogers June 14, 2012

Parents Should Preread

This book revolves around a romance between a vampire and a human girl. If you don't want your child, reading fantasy, this is an automatic red flag for you. Otherwise, Bella is a pretty good role model for the most part. She's smart and somewhat on the feminist side at times, but she rushes into love with someone who's told her explicitly that he wants to kill her and drink her blood. As far as violence goes, blood and killing is talked about very openly, and there is one battle resulting in death at the end of the book. The villain breaks Bella's leg and bites her while filming her torture to show to her boyfriend. Her boyfriend sort of stalks her before they date - sneaking into her room to watch her sleep, even, and he spends the night every night with her without the parent knowing. She calls her father by his first name regularly, and ends up almost getting raped. Alot of passionate kissing is described and Bella downs Nyquill to make her go to sleep. Brands are mentioned alot.
What other families should know
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Parent of a 9 and 10 year old Written byBonna May 22, 2012

Twilight Saga: Twilight

The first book in the Twilight Series is the most mild. It does contain some violence and mild sexual content.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Adult Written byAunty Kat April 17, 2012

Sometimes Father Knows Best

on one trip to the book store I overheard a father arguing with his teenage daughter about how she wanted to buy a teen novel and he insisted that it was all "trash" and that she should only read classics. I was appalled by this because there are plenty of great teen novels with wonderful characters and messages that aren't as hard for teens to comprehend. however this was the book she was trying to buy and while I do not agree with that father entirely, I applaud him for keeping her from this disastrously awful piece of ... excrement. Bella is the complete opposite of what anyone would want their daughter to be. completely dependent, obsessive, no interests other than Edward who is a possessive, chauvinist pig. This book is worse than any traditional princess fairy tale in terms of molding the young and impressional into pining, brainless women or meat-headed, abusive men. Just don't buy it. I'm still trying to undo the damage this did to my 13-year-old niece.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Adult Written byReada April 12, 2012

Teen Vampire in Shining Armor?

Over-rated romantic silliness--like "Harlequin Romances," if you recall those. VERY easy to read, little or no character or plot development, and full of burning adolescent desire mixed with a fixation on the "perfection" of vampires. Appropriate content for teens but not younger readers. I have a hunch that teen girls like it because Edward, a "perfect" male vampire, is in love with Bella but manages to control his lust for her as well as to protect her from every conceivable danger. He is the fantasy male for any teen girl: a "safe" man despite his fantastic looks, enormous intelligence, and sexual longing for an "ordinary" (human, clumsy) girl, who demands nothing from her in return.
Adult Written byGaleStorm March 15, 2012

Don't waste your time

This book is really just a very long treatise on how wonderful Bella thinks Edward is. The writing style consists of overblown descriptions and very little else. Edward has a dangerous amount of power over Bella, and sneaks into her room at night to watch her sleep. Not only is this acceptable to Bella, she finds it "sweet." Edward is always warning Bella that if they go too far, he could crush her... which begs the question, why doesn't he turn her into a vampire if they love each other so much? However, throughout the series, he keeps saying that she "doesn't know the risks." No sufficient risks are shown to come with being a vampire, (other than driving over 100 miles per hour and endangering other drivers, and losing your friends because of your sparkles) and Bella is put in MORE danger than if she had been turned, due to her blood smelling so delicious to other vampires who are not "vegetarian" as Edward is. Other than the abusive relationship glorified in this book, there is very little substance to this story. I am a very fast reader, and books this long generally take up to three days to read. However, due to this book's non-existent storyline and ridiculous premise, it took me two weeks. And the ending is pretty disappointing, too. I was fifteen years old when I read this book, and I never want to touch it again.
What other families should know
Too much sex
Parent Written byArcanite February 28, 2012

Uneducated and ignorant of mental illness.

Okay I read a few reviews but noticed no one reviewed the constant references to mental illness and wanted to speak about them. Just to let you know a bit about me and why I have chosen to write about this aspect of the book I will give you a bit of my backround, I have bipolar and seperate pychotic episodes they first started when I was 13 and as a result landed me in abusive relationships. Now I was disgusted by the authors uneducated descriptions of catatonia pychosis and depression as some one who suffered greatly as a result of these during my teenage years before any one knew what was wrong I found the book downright hurtfull. She describes these things completly wrong, forgets that pychosis is not something you get for a bad break up it is a genetic problem and adds to the lies and stigma that I have grown up with. The author describes what she believes to be pychosis as a controllable event that she can summon by being recklace and seeks to make more so called pychotic episodes occur (which is impossible if we could control them they would not be a problem ) describes them as being something good rather than the terrifying experience and effect they actually have on a persons life. Her descriptions of mental health in the second book are about as close to realistic as her vampires are to myths. Bella Swan is a shallow (she barely describes Edwards personality) girl who pretends to be a feminist with strong values while fantasising about being rescued. The entire story seems to be based around Bella being saved, which is more harmful because she claims to be strong and tells young girls that this is how to be strong and independant. And a attention seeking prat who wants to be really mentally ill for sympathy and attention (its not good enough for her to be severly depressed which is extremily hard going as anyone who has been there knows after a bad relationship and bad breakup, but has to have catatonia and pychosis as a result which is a genetic illness you are born with that activates at some point in your life) she tries to glamorize mental illness and make out its cool to hear voices and describes suicide pacts as being the epitomy of romance. The author is uneducated about so many areas of life yet instead of researching and doing it right has just thrown in what she thinks sounds right. I would not let my children read this as I think it is basically a Mills and Boon book with a vampire, that does little to educate and help understand others problems.
Educator Written byLibrarianAnonymous January 12, 2012

Anti-feminist?

As a youth services librarian, I was obligated to read the Twilight Saga. At first, Bella seems to be an intelligent and independent young woman. She reads Jane Eyre. I get it. Ultimately, however, her independence comes off as just plain stubborn. Rather than fight for herself, she fights to give herself to Edward entirely and I'm just not comfortable with that. Her example is a dangerous one for young girls who are just experiencing their first relationships. Sure, Edward's abrupt mood changes and frequent absences can be explained by his vampirism... but he isn't exactly the model boyfriend. His treatment of Bella vacillates from frenzied to frigid and she remains steadfastly devoted, almost obsessed. The relationship between them is unhealthy through and through.
Educator and Parent Written bychinchillalover January 9, 2012

flat, one dimensional characters

Poorly written, with a weak female protagonist. Bella can't seem to do anything well by herself...Edward even has to remind her to eat!
Parent Written byBandsauce December 14, 2011

OH GOD WAT

fetishes thinly veiled lie within these books: necrophillia(vampires are technically glorified zombies ya know), pedophillia(edward dumps bella after the child is born and shags it) also, it teaches men that its alright to stalk the girl they like. nice.

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