Disney Infinity 3.0: Toy Box Takeover

Game review by
Christy Matte, Common Sense Media
Disney Infinity 3.0: Toy Box Takeover Game Poster Image
Engaging while it lasts, but too much repetitive gameplay.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Good-vs.-evil sort of story, and you're on the side of good. But there's a lot of fighting.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Playable characters fighting villains to regain control of magic. They're positive, resilient.

Ease of Play

Controls identical to Disney Infinity game, but camera is zoomed out, trickier to control.

Violence

Battle-centric adventure with a range of weapons, fighting abilities. It's all animated, no blood. Characters who run out of health either dissolve, break into pieces.

Sex

Many characters have tight-fitting costumes, as they do in their respective movies, TV shows.

Language
Consumerism

Based entirely on Disney movies, TV show franchises, but as an add-on exerts little pressure to buy additional items.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents needs to know that Disney Infinity 3.0: Toy Box Takeover is an add-on to the main Disney Infinity 3.0 game. It's entirely focused on fighting off a seemingly never-ending slew of villains, so there's a lot of cartoon violence involved. Humanoid characters dissolve when their health runs out, while robots break into pieces. There's no blood, and kids can keep playing with a different character. Some of the characters do wear form-fitting outfits, but it's basically what you'd see in any of the related animated movies or on TV shows.

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What's it about?

The DISNEY INFINITY 3.0: TOY BOX TAKEOVER add-on has a stand-alone story. As Mickey Mouse uses a magic wand to add his friends to the game, Syndrome (from The Incredibles) appears and takes his wand so he can add the villains as well. Merlin (from The Sword in the Stone) chastises Mickey for not being more careful with magic, but soon his wand is taken as well. The goal of the game is to retrieve the magic wands. To do so, players must go through a series of themed levels (Pirates of the Caribbean, Marvel, The Lone Ranger, The Death Star, and Syndrome's Volcano). Each one is chock-full of villains to fight past, as well as unlockable items. They can be played at four difficulty levels. There's also the Hero Destroyer, a randomly generated challenge with three phases to fight through, including a boss battle with a Disney villain. The game makes heavy use of a sidekick who helps fight off the villains, and players can unlock dozens of sidekicks, as well as some cool set pieces, as they play.

Is it any good?

Though this is a fun addition to the main game, play-through is short (only a few hours) and it eventually starts to feel like simply a way for developers to dole out new sidekicks in a slow manner. Playing through the initial story line is a pleasant enough; it's different from the Play Sets, and there are a lot of cool things to unlock. It's also a great way to level up characters who don't have a Play Set of their own. But once you've made it to the end, you'll soon realize you need to go through it again to unlock the items you missed (or a second or third round of sidekicks). This isn't so bad, as there's also an achievement for playing through at the three hardest difficulty levels. It's really the Hero Destroyer that's the issue. Thankfully, the randomly generated enemies and sets keep things somewhat interesting, but there are 25 sidekicks to unlock, one by one, and they are only available in the Hero Destroyer. That's a lot of time playing the same game over and over (aka grinding), because even with the changes of scenery and enemies, the levels themselves aren't radically different.

There's also a new enemy, apparently caused by some rogue magic, that looks like an angry tornado. It follows you around, including in the air, and kills you on contact. And it's infuriating, especially in single-player games. Disney Infinity 3.0: Toy Box Takeover adds something to the game, but it may not be quite enough to warrant the separate packaging and cost. Worse, you'll be pressured to buy it regardless, because there are set items in the Toy Box Store and achievements (and sidekicks) you can't access without it.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in the game. How does it make you feel? Was there another solution for Syndrome? For Merlin and Mickey?

  • What movie or TV show would you have liked to see as a level? Draw it out. Can you design it in the Toy Box?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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