Want personalized picks that fit your family?

Find entertainment that fits your kid's interests and your parenting style.

Go to For Your Family

Parent reviews for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Common Sense says

Vast adventure with some combat rewards logical thinking.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 34 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 77 reviews
Parent Written byDave H. February 4, 2018

One of the best video games of all time.

We got the switch for Christmas and my mother got my son Zelda, Breath of the Wild. This is a game we play together and offers me great teaching opportunities. For the more difficult parts I’ll play(bosses mostly) The puzzles are amazing and allow me to teach my son cooperative problem solving. The graphics and music are absolutely beautiful. The world is huge, completely open ended and you aren’t required to play the game in any particular order. There is mild violence but no blood and gore. To be honest my 6 year old sees more graphic violence watching and playing football than playing this game. Just be forwarned it is quite difficult in some parts and if you aren’t planning to help your child play it it’s probably not appropriate for kids 8 and under.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Parent of a 10 year old Written byville.and April 21, 2019

Nothing in it.

Great messages and role models, easy to learn, only mild violence , no blood or gore at all.
Adult Written byRealName00 November 16, 2018

Amazing Game

An amazing game for ages at least 8+. There is a LITTLE bit of sex and drug/drinking reference but the puzzles the gameplay, All of it makes this game amazing.

This title contains:

Ease of Play
Adult Written bysam b hgvhgvb November 3, 2018

bad for kids

it is over in sex because the fairy people have big boobs that show and in one of the towns there is this girl that is in love with you and when you come unto her with no shirt she will say that is the worst outfit ever cover yourself up. and in another town you have to dress up like a woman

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written byTellebird August 18, 2018

The Best Game Nintendo Has To Offer

A little difficult for younger kids. Overall a great game. Nintendo really outdid themselves with this game. I highly recommend it to everyone!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Parent Written byRobyn P. July 20, 2018

The game play is for older kids, but my son played it with his dad and loved it

I actually really enjoyed watching my husband and 8 year old play this together. It's so beautiful and interesting. The side quests are fun and the game play lasts a LOOOOONG time. They will be working on it for a long time, making it worth the money. It really is a fantastic game. I think if my 8 year old played it by himself, it would have been to hard for him though. Good for a family of gamers.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Adult Written byHattanTawili July 20, 2018

One of the Best Video Game for adult and kid

This title contains:

Positive role models
Ease of Play
Adult Written byRosyRaichu July 5, 2018

Not for little kids, but 10 and over is definitely fine.

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a high fantasy adventure game where the hero Link explores and survives the wilderness of the lost kingdom of Hyrule. True to their family-oriented style, this Nintendo game does not indulge in violence, gore, sex, profanity or drug use. BotW features fantasy violence, with weapons like swords being used against fictional monsters. No blood or damage is ever shown. Deaths are quick, with monsters turning to black and disappearing in a puff of smoke. The bosses "bleed" a substance known as Malice, which is more of a physical manifestation of hatred and it is made clear that they are not living creatures like the rest of us. Some characters make a flirtatious "hmm" or giggle to Link, but nothing you wouldn't find in a PG film. Very minor alcohol use is suggested in one location. While never directly called alcohol, Link is told he is "too young" for the drink and can never obtain it. No profanity. Some scenes may be scary to very young children, which is why this game is given a 12 (or equivalent) rating all around the world.
Parent of a 17 and 18+ year old Written bynuenjins January 15, 2018

Easy to pick up and fun, but with minor glaring "problems" later on. Unnecessary suggestive 'content'.

The excitement of having an "open world" Zelda game is enough to make someone dive right in and spend hours getting the main character,Link, equipped and battle ready after waking from his slumber. Some flaws do hinder the experience, but overall the camera, the enemy target locking system and the slow motion dodge mechanics all work very well and minimize frustration with minimal "unfair " deaths. This allows the player to earn his victories fairly and smoothly with a very cooperative and even battle system. Although the Nintendo Switch as a console is quite underpowered compared to it's peers, the cartooish graphics of Zelda still look great and the attention to detail in all these other areas more than compensate for the gritty detail of many games of it's kind to the point that you don't even notice or care, especially after you get into the adventure early on. The only glaring flaw between the Switch and Wii U version is the occassional "hiccup" in battles on the Switch version which can cause a frame rate drop in certain areas. Once you experince this, however, you know where these rare spots are and can avoid repeat occasions. After you experiment and pull off the more intimidating moves you realize that they are actually less diffuicult than they 'look' on the screen, making a very satisfying payoff when you pull off these 'tricks' and are able to chain moves together. Very often you run into powerful enemies that can 'bake your cookies' very quickly, but you always have the option of approaching from multiple directions with different approaches in your arsenal. You can tackle these encounter in several different ways making each encounter as unique as you like. With many powers at your disposal later on you discover that experimentation and toying with these abilities are perhaps even more fun than the encounters themselves. The few drawbacks I took into consideration were these: Weapons break, ALOT, which is odd that a "realistic" mechanic like this was implemented in a game of this nature because you can still carry a truckload of weapons for no reason at all, but they all break like they were made at a toy factory and are far too brittle. this causes you to use different weapons and juggle inventory, but when a weapon breaks mid battle, which is all the time, you are left scrambling to scrounge another weapon from inventory. Although you can pause mid battle to do this, it is especially annoying in major fights and really takes away from the continuity and flow of battle. The enemies can get repetitive. There are basically 2 organic races and 'sentinel' robots you will be battling with some exceptions and winged nuisances, but you will be essentially dispatching these same enemies throughout. The bosses break this up and are interesting encounters with a memorable battle sequence and puzzle to solve but the tedium of these familiar battles sets in after awhile.You will spend most of your time traversing a very large space of land to find 'shrines' in order to solve a dungeon puzzle or challenge with mini sentinals. There is variety here, but noticeably not enough for a sandbox game of this size. Cooking....you will be doing hours of this if you want to survive the harshest battles. You can experiment with this as well and it is a unique feature that is very interesting at first. You can't save recipes though so once you find something effective you need a pen and paper to keep your found recipe for later. This however , can also require large chunks of time and become borish after your experimentation early on. You can tame and ride horses, stable multiple steeds, use a glider for traversing high to low areas of any height. Between the shrines you can climb towers which open your maps and give you even more challenges and exploration. There are even hidden challenges along the way and side quests. The only real downside is these are all acheived with these same drawbacks mentioned before, which may be a deal breaker for some, especially after getting deep into the game. On a final Added note to parents, there are fountain fairies that are oversexulized in the game which may cause some concern. There is no nudity, but these giant women are 'well endowed' in a very obvious and purposeful way. The dialogue is not overt but hints at flirtation at times, and along with some awkward 'swooning' noises, may be inappropriate for younger players. In an otherwise family conscious action title, it's awkward and out of place in an otherwise tame themed game.

This title contains:

Ease of Play
Adult Written byJason B. September 6, 2017

The Best of what Nintendo has to offer!

First off, if there are any families out there concerned with fantasy elements within media, I suggest you go and read J.R.R. Tolkien's essay on fairy tales. Great Messages/Role Models - Link is a self sacrificing hero through and through. In the story he has already given his life in a way for the safety of his people. The game starts with Link waking up in something called The Shrine of Resurrection (Note that link did not actually die, but was severely wounded and needed to recover in this sort of stasis healing pod). Link wakes up 100 years after Gannon (the main bad guy) attacked the kingdom. Link failed to stop him and was gravely wounded. Zelda then managed to "seal" Gannon in the castle. While Link was recuperating, Zelda has been fighting Gannon in the castle for 100 years (presumable kept young by some magic used). There is violence in this game. Link faces off agains monsters of all sorts. The message here is best stated by G.K. Chesterton: "Fairytales don’t tell children that dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairytales tell children that dragons can be killed." Younger children might need to be guided by a parent to this meaning, but older children may find a role model in the character of Link. He stands up for what is right and seeks to destroy evil in his world even though the odds are against him. Easy to Play/use: This is the hardest Zelda game to date. Definitely not for younger kids. That being said 10 year olds should find this game challenging but doable. Learning enemy patterns and combat is difficult at first, but will eventually be mastered. There are 120 "shrines" that present easy-difficult puzzles using the games incredible physics and environment engine. There are multiple ways to solve puzzles throughout the game which promotes creativity in all areas of play. Consumerism - In this game you do collect a lot of items, but the majority of them are earned or found rather than simply purchased. An underlying theme of the game is exploration. The map is vast and any player will want to explore every single mountain top and valley just to see what's there. The currency of the game does play a big role in acquiring some items, but it is not the focal point of the game. Drinking/drugs/smoking - There is one area where there is a bar and they tell you that you can't have any of their drinks because you are under age. In the bar there is one character who is passed out. This is a side quest that does not need to be completed and would most likely go over the heads of most children. Swearing - No foul language at all Sex - There are a few things to mention here. Firstly, in the game there are 4 great fairy fountains that player can locate. The fairies huge and dressed extravagantly with tons of make up and glitter. Like a form fitting sparkly bathing suit. They have large breasts but the game doesn't focus on them. They make comments on how Link is handsome and when they upgrade his gear (that is their function) they blow kisses, hug, kiss Link in a way that is to be seen as comical. They are not a huge part of the game, and you can literally play for hours and hours without encountering one. Secondly, in the South Western part of the map, there is a race called the Gerudo. They are a race of tall, muscular women. (Think Amazon type). Tall (almost twice as tall as Link), dark skin (some are lighter). There are older, younger, and children Gerudu, and there are different body types as well (some are huskier and more heavy set, I give some props for Nintendo for including this). However, the majority of them are tall, slim and muscular. They wear baggy pants with an exposed belly and bra top. One of them is a Champion that Link knew in the past and is in a few cut scenes (but not in a sexual way, aside from here costume). A small detail that most won't notice is that all the Gerudo wear slightly elevated heels. A detail I wish wasn't in the game as heels are sometimes seen as "sexy." There is no love interest with any of these characters, but Link does need to disguise himself as a girl to gain access to their town because they don't allow men in. Again, this cross dressing is meant to be comical and makes no attempt to push agendas that are outside of gaming. The Gerudo are warriors and definitely do not take the whole "damsel in distress" role. Two of the champions that Link fights beside are female, so there are strong female characters present (more on that in a moment). Aside from the Gerudo and the Great Fairies all other female characters are dressed modestly. A Damsel in Distress - One of the critiques of this game is that it promotes that men must always save women and that women need to be rescued. The main story of all the Zelda games is in fact that Link needs to save Zelda from Gannon. But more modern Zelda games put a different twist on it (In Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time, Zelda actually disguises herself as a ninja type character to fight alongside and aid Link). In Breath of the Wild, Zelda is indeed in need of rescuing, but only because Link failed to protect her the first time they encountered Gannon, and she has been fighting Gannon on her own for the past 100 years while you recovered in the stasis healing pod. Part of the story is that Zelda has struggled to find the her purpose and power necessary to overcome the evil in the world. Only after Link fails to protect her, does the power become realized within her, and she uses that power to save Link from death at the hands of a monster. At first glance you could see only "man saving woman" but a closer look at the story shows that there is more going on. Two of the champions are female and were chosen to be champions because of their capability and skill in planning and battle. Themes in Zelda: In most Zelda games the relic called the Triforce plays a major role. In Breath of the Wild, it is curiously absent save for veiled references. The Triforce is represented by three golden triangles each representing the virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage. These virtues were created by the Goddess Hylia (the supreme God of the Zelda universe) and represented by three lesser spirits or dragons depending on the game. In each game Link always possess the Triforce of courage, Zelda has the Triforce of wisdom, and Gannon (the bad guy), the Triforce of power. Gannon seeks control of all three so he can conquer the world. How he originally got the triforce of power remains unknown, but it can be used to teach children that power itself isn't evil, but if you have wisdom and courage alongside it, power can be a power for the forces of good in the world. In Breath of the Wild, Gannon is depicted as a monster (in earlier games he was a Gerudo man but that's another discussion). The game states that in his lust for power he lost all resemblance to humanity and became an embodiment of Evil. There is no pity for this character in Breath of the Wild, only a driving need to defeat evil and rebuild the world it destroyed. I hope this article helps you decide if this game is worth letting your kids play. This game is truly a masterpiece!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Parent of a 8 year old Written byDanielle W. June 2, 2019

Challenging Spatial Puzzles, Positive Messages, Fun For The Whole Family

This game may be challenging for very young kids, but I highly recommend playing it together as a family. I think 8+ might need assistance from an adult. 12+ would be able to play this game independently. My 8 year old loves catching and taming the wild horses in the game, so there are a million ways to play without following any specific path. The graphics are absolutely beautiful! There are hundreds of puzzles that challenge your brain and teach spatial awareness (rather than so many other games which are only about fighting/killing with no educational element). The overall message is the classic good vs. evil, but also redemption and friendship. In the beginning both heroes, Zelda and Link, have failed and have to try again to defeat Gannon, who represents pure hate. I like that message that failure is not the end of the game, but the beginning. There are some romantic themes, but nothing overtly sexual. It's more like implied crushes between characters. One challenge involves matching up two characters that are looking for love and then attending their wedding, but it's very PG. You do fight and kill enemies, but there is no blood or gore and all the enemies are clearly embodiments of evil. You can hunt animals to cook into meals, as the game also adds a survivalist element, however, you can choose not to do this and the game would still make sense. You can still cook in the game too and just make vegetarian meals. If your child really wants to play and you have concerns about it, my recommendation is to play it together. I really enjoy playing as a family and it gives you, the parent more control as to what parts of the game you let your child play.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Ease of Play
Adult Written byUrbanHuntr April 19, 2019

Great Game For Most Kids

Breath of the Wild is a great game. There is no denying it. But there certainly some problems as well. I played the game for over 100 hours, and lots of parts of the game were repetitive. As for the age rating, there are some parts of the game with something of concern. One of these are scantily clad entities called Great Fairies who kiss you to level up your clothes, but the contact isn't actually shown and is done in a comical fashion. Some other parts of the game that could be of concern is the race of woman called gerudo, who wear clothes that reveal their stomachs, and the inclusion of a bar where the bartender tells you that you are too young to drink. As for violence, the main character, Link, wields either a sword and shield or spear and uses these to attack monsters like bokoblins. What is far more important however, is the positive messages found throughout the game. The protagonist is a hero devoted to doing what is right and some cut scenes show how Princess Zelda (who the title is named after) is just as devoted as Link is and can be very powerful, showing how she is not a damsel in distress like other games in the series. All in all, the games few drawbacks are less important than the positive messages and game quality which Breath of the Wild is adored for.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Parent of a 8 and 11 year old Written byStevenmhyde April 16, 2019

Adventurous

Whoever rated this an 18 is so so wrong, this game is not intend to use sexual content and whats wrong with defeating bad guys, it really lets you adventure with NO blood WHAT SO EVER.
Adult Written byJMcM2018 January 27, 2019

Disturbing but fun title from Nintendo

I bought this game for my 10 year old son. Being a fan of Zelda games myself I watched him play it. We were both deeply disturbed by the amount of killing in this game, especially involving innocent creatures. I finished this game by myself. The disturbing parts aside, BoTW has a fairly OK storyline with a few confusing parts. For an open world game, there was a lot to do/explore, and no shortage of interesting things to discover in the world. This being said, the graphics aren't quite up to par (we used a high resolution TV) with today's standards but they were not atrocious. The characters themselves are relatively shallow, but it can definitely be said that both Link and Zelda are brave and courageous, and definitely good role models for children. Overall, I'd say to gauge how your child handles violence and how your family views killing animals, but this title should probably stick with the teens.

This title contains:

Positive role models
Ease of Play
Violence & scariness
Adult Written byPrinceD112 January 17, 2019

A Great Game for Slightly Older kids.

This is a really fun game that engages kids and forces them to use their natural puzzle-solving skills to complete "shrines". Of course there are certain aspects that might scare children, for example, "Calamity Ganon" or for your younger kids even "Bokoblins". Aside from this it does contain the occasional sexual references and clothes with Link disguised as a woman and the Great Fairy Fountain. These in particular is what raises the rating. There is a minor reference of alcohol and Link being too young to drink it, but other than that The Legend of Zelda is a wonderful game, possibly my favourite.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Ease of Play
Adult Written byTinGamerTV January 12, 2019

Good details.

This is a nice game. People think there is consumerism, sex and drinking/drugs/smoking, but is not true. However, violence is the true part of reviews. It also has positive messages and is easy to play. It might be online. I give this game an ESRB 10+, USK 10, PEGI 7 and a PG (Parental Guidance Suggested – some material may not be suitable for children.).

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Ease of Play
Violence & scariness
Privacy & Safety
Adult Written byZeldaPlayer101 December 10, 2018

Suitable For Children

I highly advise you to buy this game for children as a holiday treat or as a present because it holds your attention for long periods of time and it has next to no violence, no sex, no drug use but it does have positive role models so you don’t need to watch your children play it. I would rate this game for children age 7 and above as it has no negative attributes.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Ease of Play
Parent of a 10 year old Written byppopey78 December 4, 2018

Hours of adventuring!

Firstly, i bought BOTW for myself after seeing many episodes of others playing it on Youtube. Our daughter took an immediate interest in it as well and wanted to play it so we bought it for her 10th Birthday. She is quite competent with it but does need some help figuring out some of the shrines and quests. There is violence in it, but it is not graphic (Link has to raid monster camps and fight others as well) and no blood. It is not defeating monsters for no effort as after Link has defeated them they drop useful weapons or other items Link can pick up and use. There is plenty of adventuring and overcoming obstacles and figuring our puzzles as well; Link also has to cook which, depending on the ingredients used gives him various benefits like attack up or the ability to move stealthily or resist electricity. So whilst there is the fighting aspect of this game, it encourages problem solving as well. The other benefit is that because it is an open world game you will be playing it for a long time. Fans of the Zelda franchise will love this.

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Adult Written by0basarj November 14, 2018

A fantastic art statement!

As art and it’s audience matures, there’s plenty of conversation around the qualifications that make something artistic. One of the most oft-contested mediums though is the video-game. Interactive media has always been a heaping fistful of experimentation, and in that vain it’s widely regarded as nothing more than a juvenile vice. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, however, makes an extremely compelling argument for the mediums recognition, delivering especially well to the eyes and ears. Most immediately noticeable in the title are the stunning visuals. The game spares no expense at getting you into its world as fast as it can for this reason, and it pays off immediately. Lush, green fields give way to cold grey mountains, capped by shimmering snow and ghastly fog. It’s truly beautiful to see in motion, and carves a league of its own in the department, rising far above it’s oversaturated black and grey peers. Particularly enrapturing is the colors, in my opinion. Understated, subtle, but meaningful. It would hardly be doing it justice to skip mention of the audio, too. Ambient piano pieces fade in and out of earshot, but when they leave you're left with your environment. Bird calls are carried by the hum of the wind, every step is confirmed by a walking-surface-appropriate crunch. However rare, there is music in a traditional sense too, often to give a bespoke touch to specific scenes or places. These fuller pieces are often simple, but always fantastic. The composition here is as strong as it gets, and may ever be. Tracks like Mipha’s Theme are emotional ballads to a dead world, whereas Stone Talus is closer to a playful action scoring. No game is complete without gameplay, of course, and Breath of the Wild comes through in spades. The controls feel tight and precise: no doubt that Nintendo magic played a part there. The interaction with the environment is top notch too, with objectives giving way to several possible paths about them. Need to remove a tree? Chop it down, burn it or blow it up, the choice is yours. The scope of it all feels second nature, which can lead to frustration in certain sequences though. And the story is nothing notable either, but does its job well. Aside from those relatively minor grievances, the game portion is quite good, and as a whole it’s an easy 9/10.

This title contains:

Ease of Play
Adult Written byZ6890 July 13, 2018

Pages