Zippity

Game review by
Jinny Gudmundsen, Common Sense Media
Zippity Game Poster Image
Preschoolers run and jump to play learning games on TV.

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

All the characters encourage kids to move and learn important preschool skills including identifying colors and numbers.

Positive Role Models & Representations

All of the characters are supportive of the player and encourage running and jumping as well as learning.

Ease of Play

The game is very easy to play with good instuctions. However, there is a slight lag between the child's movements and when things happen on the screen.

Violence & Scariness
Language
Consumerism

Many of the characters in the games are branded Disney characters like Mickey Mouse, Goofy, Winnie the Pooh, Handy Manny, and others.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Zippity is a plug-and-play gaming system for preschoolers with add-on cartridges that make it expandable. The gameplay encourages preschoolers to move, dance, run, and jump while also introducing educational concepts like learning numbers and letters of the alphabet. It is played on a special mat controller, similar to how DDR games are played. However, this mat controller also has a giant joystick called a "bopper," which allows young kids to learn how direct characters in video games.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2 and 2 year old Written bykawasaki January 27, 2010
Parent of a 3 year old Written bytlgbradford October 18, 2010

Pricey toy if the company isn't going to follow through with good software.

Not worth the money. I had high hopes since it's from Leap Frog, but the preloaded games get boring very quickly, and they have been very slow to introduce... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's it about?

The ZIPPITY LEARNING SYSTEM is the result of a collaboration between LeapFrog and Disney. It plugs directly into your TV to create a gaming system for preschoolers. Kids play by running and jumping on a special mat controller and using a waist-high joystick called \"The Bopper.\" The mat has four colored spots on which to step. The bopper can be moved to the right, left, away from you and toward you. Some of the games use just the mat, while others use both the mat and the bopper. The games introduce the preschool learning skills of memory, following directions, music, numbers, letters of the alphabet, colors and beginning Spanish. All of the games can be played on two levels of difficulty. For example, one of the easy games on level one is played with Goofy, where he shows you how to dance by placing your feet on the colored spots on the mat. He shows you an order in which to step on the colors and asks you to repeat it. As you do, he dances on the screen.

Is it any good?

The Zippity is a good way to introduce young children to learning games. It makes the learning fun because kids are playing with branded characters that they enjoy. But more importantly, the games encourage kids to do physical things they like to do, like dance or march in place. It also does a good job of introducing young children to how to play video games. Each game has a tutorial and two of the eight are side-scrolling games which use the bopper to navigate.

The games have high quality TV graphics not usually found in a plug-and-play game, and the music is very well done. In the games with The Little Einsteins, you even learn about such classics as Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Grieg's Hall of the Mountain King.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • What were your favorite games? Was it your favorite because of who you played with or because of what your were asked to do?

Game details

For kids who love preschool games

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate