Titanic Movie Poster Image
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One of the highest-grossing films of all time is often considered a guilty pleasure, despite its 11 Oscars. But there's an irresistible love story starring two of the best actors of their generation (Leo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet); an evil villain; dazzling visual effects; and a soaring score.

About a Boy Movie Poster Image
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Will wants to live a life of no attachments, but a troubled 12-year-old boy ultimately insists on becoming the closest thing to a friend Will has ever known. A purely satisfying and enjoyable film, with a superb performance of great honesty, subtlety, and comic timing from Hugh Grant.

The Color Purple Movie Poster Image
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In this inspiring, wrenching drama, Celie, a Southern woman, journeys from abuse to independence. The film deals with traumatic issues, including child abuse, sexual abuse, racism, and sexism and has complex African-American characters rarely seen in American movies. Based on Alice Walker's novel.

The King's Speech Movie Poster Image
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In 1936, King George VI inherits the British throne -- but he stammers. Over time, a speech therapist helps him gain the confidence and will to overcome his fears and let his voice be heard. Based on true events, with masterful performances from Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, and Helena Bonham Carter.

The Namesake Movie Poster Image
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A heartfelt depiction of a Bengali-American family that addresses the complexity of being raised by immigrant parents. A sudden tragedy brings Gogol home, where he rediscovers the meaning of his name and begins a new life with a fiercely modern wife and a deeper appreciation for his parents.

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Common Sense Tips

Common Sense Tips

  • Schedule a time to watch an intense film. Ban multitasking, and then discuss difficult scenes.
  • Ask teens for their own examples of hardship or prejudice that help them relate to these movies.