Do the Right Thing Movie Poster Image
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On one hot summer day in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, residents battle despair, joblessness, discrimination, and each other. Blame is everywhere; anger predominates. Spike Lee's intense study of racism in urban America during the late 1980s. 

The Godfather Movie Poster Image
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Mob-family patriarch Don Corleone is on his way out, and his most promising potential heir is his war-hero son, Michael. As family members cope with the trials of gangster life, the latent power structures of society and family become evident. Rightly considered one of the greatest films ever made. 

Network Movie Poster Image
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When the anchorman of a TV network finds out he's being fired, he announces he'll kill himself during his last broadcast. Often said to be the movie that predicted "trash TV," it seems especially on-target about the idea of huge, anything-for-money corporations running the media. For mature teens.

The Pianist Movie Poster Image
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The devastating true story of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a Jewish pianist in Poland caught in the horrors of World War II. Roman Polanski, a Holocaust survivor who lost many family members, powerfully conveys the journey of a man transformed from a highly cultured musician to a scavenging, debased shell.

Slumdog Millionaire Movie Poster Image
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Jamal has made it to the second-to-last question on a quiz show, and the cops want to know how he's cheating -- the only way an uneducated boy from the slums could be winning. A big, bold, beautiful film about heroism, true love, and unfailing friendship set in rough-and-tumble modern India.

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Common Sense Tips

Common Sense Tips

  • Schedule a time to watch an intense film. Ban multitasking, and then discuss difficult scenes.
  • Ask teens for their own examples of hardship or prejudice that help them relate to these movies.