Kids’ Health Care Is Under Attack, Again

Make your voice heard to protect the 9 million kids whose health care coverage is at risk. By Kelsey Kober
Kids’ Health Care Is Under Attack, Again

Last summer, Kids Action advocates like you stood up to protect kids' health care. And it worked -- the dangerous effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act was defeated in the Senate. But we need your help again. There is a new opportunity and a serious new threat on the kids' health care front right now: the reauthorization of the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the Graham-Cassidy bill that would drastically cut Medicaid and remove protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

The opportunity: "CHIP" in to Save Kids' Health Care

CHIP is not exactly a household name. It does not refer to the new security feature on your credit card, and it doesn't go in a cookie. But it is a big deal for low-income kids. This federal-state program covers 9 million low-income kids whose parents don't qualify for Medicaid. CHIP will expire Sept. 30 if Congress doesn't move to reauthorize it. If this happens, five states (including California and the District of Columbia) will run out of money to cover kids as early as October. Congress must act right now to keep the kids covered by CHIP -- roughly one out of 10 American kids -- from losing their care. Take action!

The threat: Reject the New Push to Repeal the Affordable Care Act

Regrettably, another partisan attempt to undermine the Affordable Care Act is advancing in the Senate, so far without holding public hearings or getting a full cost estimate from the independent Congressional Budget Office. The Graham-Cassidy bill, as it is known, would eliminate federal health care spending for Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act subsidies and instead transfer them to a block grant to each state. That will drastically limit the amount the states can spend on each kid and would allow states to waive the requirement that insurers cover kids and adults with pre-existing conditions at fair rates. Take action!

We have made progress in recent years, and we should not reverse course. A new U.S. Census report showed that between the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid, and CHIP, 95 percent of kids are covered today -- the highest percentage in American history. Making sure that America's kids have access to quality care should not be controversial.

Please call your senators and representatives to let them know that you support the reauthorization of CHIP and oppose any change to health care law that would reduce the number of people covered and the quality of the coverage they receive.

About Kelsey Kober

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Comments (4)

Parent of a 10 and 14 year old written by Snoozhe

Please keep this site focused on media and kids. A political opinion about something that has many sides is polarizing for CSM and should be avoided. Our insurance system is complicated and can't be explained or defended in 4 paragraphs. CSM should advocate for this elsewhere. Disappointed.
Parent of a 12 year old written by nikkich

I agree to keep this site non political. I would think common sense media would loose many people from using it's website, including myself, if politics are to be discussed!
Parent written by Dan G.

The repeal of the ACA is not about locking children out of health care. It is about releasing others from being under threat of force to pay for it. It feels so wonderful to give free stuff away to others, as long as we are making others pay for our desire to do good. Why should I have to pay for my health care and that of my children AND have to pay for other's children as well? We should not be slaves. BTW, what's the national debt that we are saddling our children up to now? ACA is only serving to make it worse.
Adult written by Adamson-CT

Please don't make this site political . This is BS and has nothing to do with what common sense media is all about.

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