Common Sense Media says

Lavish, award-winning film with mature themes.

Users say

(out of 30 reviews)
age 13+
Review this title!
Parent of a 10 and 12 year old Written bynaturelovers October 8, 2011

perfect movie - kids won't appreciate

The acting is superb, the music heavenly and I don't really care it's not true to history. Most historic accounts aren't... It gets us to listen to beautiful music and appreciate his genius! This is one of my most favorite movies! In America only for kids over 16 because of the puritan fear of nudity!
Adult Written bysteven009 December 9, 2010
There is more than just "a naked backside". There is a scene when Mozart's wife goes to sleep with Salieri so he will let Mozart teach lessons to someone. It shows her stripping and makes no effort to hide her completely bare torso. I didn't finish the movie, so I don't know what else there is, but it is certainly worse than "Sex: Mozart enjoys romps with his wife. A naked backside."
What other families should know
Too much sex
Teen, 15 years old Written byanimalloverkt April 9, 2008

I was hooked!

AMADEUS is a wonderfully written movie full of intrigue, plot twists, and classical music. (What more could one want?) This movie is told in first person...from the viewpoint of Antonio Salieri, the badguy, also Mozart's rival. Rather, Mozart was Salieri's rival. There are some weak spots, however. There is social drinking, hypocrisy by Salieri at many points, Mozart's running around with various women, and his outright disrespect for Salieri and others. For example, Salieri is in love with an up and coming soprano. It is mentioned in front of the company, which includes Mozart, Salieri, and Salieri's crush, if you will. It is mentioned that Mozart is engaged to another girl. Salieri's crush hits Mozart over the head with her fan, and storms off. Salieri concludes that he had been messing with her, and henceforth begins his obsession with killing Mozart. But Mozart's talent was not to be denied, and he quickly gained favor with the Emperor, which threatens Salieri's high ranking job as the Court Composer. This further motivates him to kill Mozart. He comes up with a plan to steal a funeral mass written by Mozart and play it at his funeral as his own [Salieri's own work]. Mozart dies, and the funeral mass is unfinished. Salieri claims guilt, but his obsession leaves the question of whether he pleased with his devilish deed.
Parent Written bymattbruns3 October 22, 2015

A good history movie but questionable

There are two versions the theatrical version Rated PG(more deserving of PG-13) and Extended Edition Rated R. The Rated R version has a sexual scene with nudity and the word c**t is used. The theatrical version has sensuality. theatrical edition is for 12+ extended edition is for 15+
What other families should know
Great messages
Teen, 13 years old Written byZoelopez April 5, 2013

Spoiler Alert !Amadeus starts off funny ends dark and scary

The movie is great for a music lover. I would warn kids about dark ending The movie is okay for kids until the ending. The ending is sad, dark and very serious. Though the begging and middle is a comedy and happy the ending is very scary. I had nightmares about the ending. In the ending Saliheri makes a plan to murder Mozart. Mozart slowly starts to die. And Mozart gets put in paupers grave.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Kid, 10 years old March 2, 2013

Common Sense Media mistake!!

So like, I am 10 and I think this okay. IMPORTANT NOTE TO COMMON SENSE MEDIA: ONLY THE DIRECTOR'S CUT IS RATED R. THE ORIGINAL MOVIE IS RATED PG. It is COMPLETELY NOT true to history- I studied Mozart- particularly how he died- and this is crazy to think how Mozart died. (Mozart REALLY died because of strep throat that migrated down into his blood and joints, which led to kidney failure. For more, read the book "How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous" by Georgia Bragg) Anyhow, it is a VERY funny movie. Every time I look at Salieri, I am reminded of Nicholas Cage for some reason... hmmm... Like I said, the DIRECTOR'S CUT IS RATED R for boob-revealing and I believe they say the WORST word... and I am not talking about the F-word. THE REAL VERSION IS PG. I CAN NOT STRESS THAT ENOUGH. >_<
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 14 years old Written bysuper mello January 11, 2009

great movie

this is a great movie for musicians to watch, but my non musician friends really enjoyed it too. it was really an interesting perspective, and even though its a ficticious story, there were some really interesting bits of truth.
Adult Written byHaloFreak123 April 9, 2008
Teen, 14 years old Written byThedude68683 April 22, 2015

boring for some great for others

i am currently watching as i type the directors cut which is 3 hrs long however this movie is a genius example of historical fiction in my opinion
Kid, 12 years old May 31, 2014

Wow!

Wonderful!
What other families should know
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much sex
Adult Written bymoviemadness May 10, 2009

Loooonnnngggg Mozart Movie

Amadeus was one of the most drawn out movies that I have ever seen. It is MUCH to heavy for younger kids, and most below 14 will be bored. For violence, the movie is really scary at parts. Sex, we se a man fully nude from the front for a moment and Mozart and his wife have their moments...
Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008

Salieri vs. Mozart

I find this movie to be excellent. Sure, it had a little bit of cursing, sexual references, etc., but mature viewers ignore that easily. The characters were absolutely riveting, and I found that the theme of envy and how it can ruin people on both sides worked quite well. It also established deeper truths, such as how Mozart, though seeming ditzy at times, was actually a diligent worker, and how Mozart's music was still great, though other people didn't always think it was. Classical music was a plus, and though I may be biased, as a pianist, flautist, and violinist, this was still a great movie and I urge everyone, even people not that interesting in classical music to watch it.
Teen, 15 years old Written byokdude March 6, 2015
I studied Salieri in school. Actually the rumor only started that Mozart was poisoned by Salieri was because Mozart wanted what Salieri had. Mozart was jealous of Salieri.
Parent of a 8 year old Written bymelwest@berkeley.edu August 1, 2010
Adult Written byadam1995 March 13, 2014

Amazing movie! A true classic!

A really brilliant movie, one of my favourites! Definitely deserved its 8 Oscars. There is some inappropriate content, with the biggest concerns being a brief scene showing a topless woman with her bare breasts exposed, and a few men are seen fully nude at an insane asylum (with their buttocks and genitals seen, but very briefly and in the background). A main character is an alcoholic and the effects of this are seen negatively. As for language, there are a few uses of sh*t, and one obscured use of c*nt (its really hard to hear and is easily mistaken for another word). As long as parents are okay with nudity (and there isn't very much at all), then I reckon kids 10 and up will be fine with the movie (although young kids may get bored with the 3 hour running time).
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 14 years old Written byProjektor June 13, 2015

This movie is great story of composers disputes.

This movie is very opressive and this movie have sensuality, bref breast nudity and brief bloody scene.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Teen, 13 years old Written bycricketcat December 24, 2012

PG or R? (big difference)

On the CSM review it says it's R. I own this movie ,and on the back of the case it says that it's rated PG......... What's going on????
Kid, 12 years old January 13, 2012

really good movie

It's a great movie except there is some kissing and swearing like the s word. A man is found in a room and he is covered in blood! But it's a good movie because the actors are great.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Teen, 14 years old Written byethanct86 April 4, 2016

“Displace one note and there would be diminishment. Displace one phrase, and the structure would fall.”

His funeral - imagine it! The Cathedral, all Vienna sitting there. His coffin, Mozart's little coffin in the middle. And suddenly in that silence, music. A divine music bursts out over them all, a great Mass of Death: Requiem Mass for Wolfgang Mozart, composed by his devoted friend Antonio Salieri. What sublimity! What depth! What passion in the music! Salieri has been touched by God at last. And God, forced to listen. Powerless - powerless to stop it. I at the end, for once, laughing at Him. So declared Antonio Salieri, “Patron Saint of All Mediocrities,” friend of Mozart and mutual enemy of God in the impassioned and penetrating Amadeus. Milos Forman’s Amadeus film version of a Peter Shaffer play of the same name based on a novel take on a rumor originating from the life of Mozart shook the world and nabbed eight Oscars the following year, including Best Picture. After being reproduced in many forms, could it even portray Mozart as truthful and powerful as the man really was? Frankly, no. No retelling of this genius’ life can ever surpass the depth and power of Mozart’s original story and life, but Amadeus gets awfully close to it. After reading the stage play and the film’s screenplay, I felt that this movie was simply the luckiest achievement in film ever. Unlike other great films, Amadeus is “fragile” in a sense, for, taking the words of Salieri out of context, “Displace one note and there would be diminishment. Displace one phrase, and the structure would fall.” The music, one of the best aspects of Amadeus (supplied entirely from Mozart’s own compositions and performed by the prolific St. Martin in the Fields with conductor Sir Neville Marriner), creates a perfect dramatic effect while sampling a conception of Mozart’s genius. Now, after viewing Forman’s film, I visualize Mozart’s music – the drama, the context, and the inspiration behind the music. Listening to Mozart’s music now, each note and phrase triggers a memory of certain shots and emotions from the amazing insight Forman and Shaffer gave in Amadeus. Retelling his story to a priest, Salieri recounted his conceited boyish prayer with God: “Lord, make me a great composer. Let me celebrate Your glory through music and be celebrated myself. Make me famous through the world, dear God. Make me immortal. After I die, let people speak my name forever with love for what I wrote. In return, I will give You my chastity, my industry, my deepest humility, every hour of my life, Amen." Years later, Salieri, now an Austrian court composer in the service of Emperor Joseph II (Jeffrey Jones), saw with sense of betrayal God’s creation of Mozart. He knew Mozart’s music was great, and his own was not. This fact alone did not worry him; it was the fact that Mozart was a coarse and vulgar boy. Often, he had talked and prayed to a cross hanging on his wall, but once his contempt overflowed, he gave it one last prayer and gazed at it once last time – ablaze in his fireplace: Because You will not enter me, with all my need for you; because You scorn my attempts at virtue; because You choose for Your instrument a boastful, lustful, smutty infantile boy and give me for reward only the ability to recognize the Incarnation; because You are unjust, unfair, unkind, I will block You! I swear it! I will hinder and harm Your creature on earth as far as I am able. I will ruin Your Incarnation.” Ironically, although Salieri named himself virtuous and worthy of being God’s “Incarnation,” the vulgar Mozart held a closer relationship to God -- even having a certain fear and respect of Him, of which Salieri had none. But taking on the action he had sworn to do, he held Mozart in his deadly grasp, gradually sucking away his money, sanity, life, and finally, his music. With a perfect balance of words, Shaffer crafted the infamous Salieri, whom F. Murray Abraham played with intensity, and surprised us with his remarkable transition between a bitter, yet free, elderly Salieri and a quiet and calculating, thickly accented younger Salieri. No one -- not even I -- would have thought the two Salieris were played by the same actor. Abraham speaks Shaffer’s words with such resonance and a sense of illustriousness that they stand out in our minds, seeming as though his words alone had an impact on history. Though both the theatrical (PG) and director’s cut (R) versions are inherently identical, the director’s cut offers more material and, along with it, more content worries. Other than the content, Amadeus, if understood properly, provides emotionally depressing elements along with a disheartening emotional war between God and Salieri. Both versions contain usages of obscenity and scatological humor as well as overall vulgarity coming from Mozart. The director’s cut, with twenty extra minutes, shows Mozart’s loyal but worryingly dedicated wife attempting adultery in a struggle for money and also some nudity in Salieri’s insane asylum. Never before or after Amadeus had a movie effectively portray an iconic classical music figure without ruining the drama and comedy. Most of us view Mozart as an indomitable demigod-like music figure -- even if we know as a fact that Mozart was crude, barmy and ill-mannered -- but we could never comprehend that Mozart was an actual living vulgarity. Indifferently, Forman and Shaffer tore to shreds the demi-god character of Mozart and gave room for him to shine his crudity. Many have complained about the historical inaccuracies of Amadeus, especially the ending scene where Salieri takes a dictation from Mozart for his Requiem. However, as Shaffer explained in the introduction of his stage play, he changed the ending for dramatic effects. Amadeus is not a biopic; it is a historical-fiction exploring the realms of humanity, hatred and God. Forman and Shaffer left many varied and clear-cut messages in Amadeus. Some say Salieri’s downfall was caused by either his jealousy or the haughty demand in his childhood prayer, explaining why God attempted to destroy Salieri – both great points and interpretations. But I believe that the explanation of God’s wrath on Salieri is more objective. In his childhood prayer, he prayed for talent, and “In return, I will give You my chastity, my industry, my deepest humility, every hour of my life…” But as none of those qualities were evident in the film, he earned that punishment. But wasn’t Salieri’s request for a righteous man to have the musical talent an honorable request? Perhaps. And perhaps God did fulfill that request, just through a different, yet pious and talented, Austrian: Franz Joseph Haydn.
What other families should know
Great messages
Too much sex
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 15 years old Written byemogurl900 April 9, 2008

omg amazing

it was so funny i laughed alot throughout the movie and i loved t

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