Kid reviews for Coco

Common Sense says

Stunningly animated, poignant tribute to family and culture.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 122 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 89 reviews
Kid, 10 years old November 27, 2017

This movie is really well done!

This movie is great for kids who are six and up. It is also great for families to watch altogether. There are intense and emotional scenes in Coco, but overall I thought this movie was really well done.
Teen, 14 years old Written bylgk2003 January 26, 2018

Stunning, adorable, and inspiring

Coco is by far one of the most intricate and aesthetically-pleasing Disney-Pixar movies I have seen. I was expecting all of the catchy songs and great animations, but was pleasantly surprised by all of the plots twists (Disney's upped their game since Frozen) and the movie's depth (i was sobbing into my mascara off by the last time they sang "Remember Me"). It was also extremely educational, which I didn't expect. I got a good look into Días de Los Muertos and how beautiful it is. As somebody who has dealt with loss recently, the emphasis on family hit a soft spot with me. I love how they portrayed the family always caring for their children and being with them even when they are gone. This message will probably go over the heads of the little kids watching Coco, but as a teenager it was so comforting. I always get scared when a new Disney movie comes out, but Coco definitely lived up to the others.

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Kid, 12 years old February 4, 2018

Coco Review

Remember me, though I have to say goodbye, remember me... Stunningly animated adventure is funny, emotional and adorable, all at the same time! The story follows 12 year old Miguel, a boy descended from a music-forbidding family, but who has a unique passion for guitar, and is eager to end up like his idol Ernesto De La Cruz, and follow his road to fame. But though despite his family's hearts set against his ambitions, Miguel tries to find a way to bring musical joy into their lives, and on the way, he finds out he could be related to De La Cruz, he goes up close to De La Cruz's guitar, a forbidden to touch artefact, he ends up in The Land of the Dead, and that is where the drama begins... The language is extremely mild (e.g. stupid, idiot, freak etc), and there are only 1 or 2 potentially frightening scenes (e.g. Death of a loved one, brief poisoning of a major character etc), it is definitely a perfect film for a family with kids from 6 to late 20s and above! And also the musical score is fabulous! I give Coco 4/5 stars, and say it's ok for kids ages 6+.

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Kid, 11 years old December 9, 2017

Colorful and adorable movie pulls at heartstrings!

I admit, I wasn't so sure about Coco when I walked into the movie theater. It was an animated kids cartoon, which can either be really good and really bad. And judging from the constant TV commercials Coco had, I was pretty sure it was going to be cheesy and boring. But since it's my hobby to rate and review places and productions, I went to see the movie anyways. And boy was I wrong about Coco being boring and cheesy! The movie is very good for kids. Much of the movie is colorful and lively, and there's almost no rude statements in the entire movie! I definitely learned a lot about the Day of the Dead, despite learning all about it in Spanish class. Summary: [SPOILER ALERT] Despite his family's generations-old ban on music, young Miguel dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like his idol Ernesto de la Cruz. Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead. After meeting a charming trickster named Héctor, the two new friends embark on an extraordinary journey to unlock the real story behind Miguel's family history. Now for the details you are looking for. Both Miguel and his friends can be defiant and rude, but all learn that, in the end, family comes first, a good lesson for all ages. Although Miguel's family is helpful in him following his dreams and going back home, they could be a little more supportive of his personal dreams and wishes. There's almost no violence, and what there is is cartoon violence and humourous, although there is a rather scary plot twist near the end of the movie that changes everything. There's no sex or swearing, and consumerism is kept to a minimum, even with merchandise. Although wine and other drinks are drunk in some instances, theres still not a ton of drinking. So I would rate this movie for ages two and up. The end even made me cry! If you're considering watching their movie, I would recommend it for all ages! Trust me, you'll enjoy this wonderful fiesta!

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Teen, 16 years old Written byYuongHuao N. December 29, 2017

Best emotional films

Excellent movie, Emotional, Family, Holiday/Festival, Happiness, Sadness, Cultural respectful, Warm-up, Heart warming, Imaginational, Fantasy, Impressed, Hopeful, Respectful, Musician Traditional, Curiosity, Childhood moment, ECT. Following traditional festival This movie is so wonderful and I'm very like it and also this movie is so good that I can't describe with any words. If you haven't watched yet go immediately watch the movie CoCo This movie is referring cultural corner traditional of family moment. I'm highly recommended to watch it. Don't miss the magical moment of Coco is a great movie !!!!!!

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Teen, 17 years old Written byJoseph Thomas December 12, 2017

The best disney film EVER

It's really Magical

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Kid, 9 years old December 12, 2017

NOT THAT NICE!!!!!!!

It was a nice movie ,but I think it could be much better.So ,their were some nice movements but I think that the movie could be more long. I think that in this movie there are a lot of relatoins so you need to understand a lot.Any way I think that they tried their best.But i am not satisffied. It could be much better.Ok so enjoy the movie. bye!!!!

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Teen, 17 years old Written byPipeCine March 11, 2018

Death has never before been so alive

Miguel, an aspiring musician kid, runs around between colorful Mexican alleys with folkloric varieties of footwear, handmade by his family, who considers shoemaking business as the absolute job of each congener from generation to generation. Sadly, all his dreams will be interrupted by the unshakable family aversion to any minimum melody coming from an instrument; music has been radically abolished as a result of a fatal event of the past. Confused, brimming with different future plans and dangerously wrathful by the demands of his family, Miguel will be involved in a fantastic adventure, impressively deep, against time by festive landscapes of an enigmatic second dimension, one in which the deceased beings reside, those who remain semi-alive thanks to the memories of the living humans. Without any remorse, it could be said that the last Walt Disney Animation Studios & Pixar Animation Studios big bet took place almost one year ago with "Moana" by Ron Clements and John Musker, overlooking Brian Fee's irregular directional debut in summer flick "Cars 3." Almost 365 days of waiting provoked that the expectations to see the new original idea of the perfectionist studio were boosted without a break, and as they were unlocking fine details about the work, the audience demands got harder disproportionately. Needless to say, when the prior film raises the bar at a fairly high level, expectations embrace a difficult range of overcoming, the criteria for reviewing this audiovisual work were hardened in a way that it would only be considered really good if only meet the needs of the toughest public. To the delight of everybody, the newest incursion in animation genre by Disney doesn't simply meet the demands before a damn good-looking visual section, the best part comes from the charm of its characters and the substantial plot proposal that can be a long subject of debate and analysis. Computer animation has a host of genuinely creative possibilities. Over the years, thousands of silver screens have projected hundreds of stories which reflect the diversity of ideas and thoughts that can be extracted from a human mind. Within this interminable catalogue of film opportunities, the vast range of global cultures shines by itself in the visual field and despite the studio has tried to circumscribe most of its films in American environments, also gave free rein the screenwriters, resulting in small gems as "Mulan", "Aladdin" and, now "Coco". Oscar-winner Lee Unkrich and Seattle Film Critics Award-winner Adrian Molina seem to be consolidated as the kings of the present-day animation because, through the "hypothetical" inequality of years working in the field, they have achieved, in a magnificent way, to synthesize the characteristics with greater sensitivity and affinity from their previous works to use them in a plausible co-direction that allows the film to be what it is. Likewise, it was an outstanding job what they did with the general draft or/and the original story that plays a vital role for the success of the idea, in which it's possible to catch respectful and fresh reference parallelisms to certain functional aspects present in prior flicks such as the independence representation from "Finding Nemo", the overcoming of a specific problem in a gracefully dynamic way from "Monsters, Inc", and, of course, the most perceptible, an emotional and severe final message coming together harsh reality from "Toy Story 3." Additional to the aforementioned two directors-screenwriters, names of the caliber of Jason Katz and Matthew Aldrich stand out in the writing for their prestige and recognition in the company, leaving, as a result, an Aldrich-Molina explosive mix that provokes the correct working of the powerhouse script. Encompassing or synthesizing the valuable teachings of this movie is an impossible task, given that it drops them according to how the facts are happening, however, it's possible to notice edifying advises geared the unstoppable chase for a dream, responsibility that this act requires, love of and for the family, the reminder that evil still is out there waiting for an affable figure, probity, humility, the power of goodness and, of course, death. The latter subject is clearly the central concept with which the film manages to surpass some barriers, while at the same time, it's the one entailing a harder complexity. Although with the advent of modern ideologies and, consequently, relegation of the more traditional customs, this phenomenon has been shown a considerable decline, over the years, a blacklist on utmost-importance-but-sensitive-treatment subjects has been in the pipeline, themes that nobody dares to address, a series of matters which, for different reasons, are kept under an invisible but practicable veto by studio blockbusters and medium-budget movies, which prefer to avoid them because of the labile and perilous result that would mean a false step; taboos or not, these subjects would mean for any major film studio a daring position of "all or nothing." Homosexuality, political divisions, massive attacks or tragic events, social conjunctures, crude indecent language, explicit violence, euthanasia, suicide or murder compose a long list from which no one mentions. Now, if for an adult mind is really cumbersome to digest films of this kind, it's understandable that a young mind wouldn't endure even one-half of this content. However, in the case of this animated feature film, death, an openly polarizing subject at present, has got a subtle, clever treatment in order to capture, in a fantastic way, the truth hiding the loss of a loved one, using accessible analogies which stir up a proactive unique masterclass in core plot idea development. About this, the whole film moves with a comfortable margin among corny drama and circumstantial comical situations that achieve, within all that unreal and hopeful context, reflect difficult and pure reality, leaning, with respect, in the ideal Mexican holiday that fits perfectly with the leitmotiv. It's clear that what makes easier the excellent final cut is the charisma and the particular essence of the story and its characters, they are pawns serving as a bridge between message and audience. And, in addition to the fundamental role played by screenwriters, the subsequent movie weight lies in the vocal skills of actors, they must transmit a set of emotions and sensations through sound, through voice. Among the agglomerate of the cast, as well as the crew, unequivocally Latin names shine, which is its second greatest strong point: the opening to a new original culture. Anthony Gonzalez, Benjamin Bratt, Jaime Camil, Ana Ofelia Murguía and "Mozart in the Jungle" actor Gael García Bernal lead the mission of lifting their homeland up, their traditions, their voices, their needs, and now is the perfect time for a movie like this, one in which the Mexican territory is the setting for action; it must be heard not only by American ears but by everyone in this world, as an example of moving on, friendship, union; It is no secret that between country and country, hostile walls have been erected, for the moment "supposed", on economic, political and social relations; the "Make America Great Again" slogan has stoked a dangerous flame of egocentricity and intolerance that threatens the lives of thousands of either legal or illegal inmigrant, and although it's a really serious bussines, it's applaudable that from an artistic scenario begin to give the first hopeful blows to break a full-hatred wall down. And "Coco", even though its story has nothing to do with this complicated conflict at first glance, manages to raise a short but grateful criticism. To sum it all up, the film works in many ways, keeps strong messages for all ages, each spectator can extract whatever it wants from an adventure that is consolidated as the animated motion picture of the year. Creatively, the film uses its tools in a way that exhibits the meticulous quality showed in the Pixar works. It follows the patterns of introduction and development evidenced in previous works, and although the most assiduous film buffs can feel repetitive this prototype, it's always estimable the effort to dodge the traditional through stories that transcend narrative barriers, unequivocally, through emotional scripts. While the first two acts are a complete enjoyment, the highlight is reserved for the final part because "Coco" has the luxury of having the second more emotionally disturbing and sentimentally dramatic climax in an animated film of the 21st century, only behind, no doubt, "Toy Story 3". It's overwhelming the set of emotions that an audiovisual extremely glorious moment can convey audience, one that has been fire engraved in the annals of cinema, one that will ensure the presence of hankies. Although for many spectators can feel it anticlimactic and abrupt, this ending combines, perfectly, with the atmosphere of the narrative, revealing vigor and longevity that Disney maintains to date. The visual section is a whole other story. After a beautiful graphic simplicity coming from "Cars 3", the studio goes back roots and decides to bet on sharply-meticulous landscapes again, using as tools bright colors, colorful textures and confections that are going to leave you open-mouthed, maybe, that's why many film attendees come to the theaters with each new release, they're aware of the dimensions of tidiness and the labor demands that the company portrays through its continuous masterpieces. In the same way, the sound aspect excels in counted periods, however, in which it succeeds, it does it in an unbeatable way. Although it does not reach near-perfect scores as Lin-Manuel Miranda's melodies for "Moana" or Randy Newman's for "Toy Story", the film extracts what can most of these in the drama set-pieces, undoubtedly highlighting "Remember Me" by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, which climatizes the most powerful emotional moment in the movie. "Coco" by Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina condenses a wide range of American cinema's strangeness and traditional elements, delivering the animated audiovisual work of the year par excellence. This enjoyable and deeply touching Magnum opus has reserved a gold place in the most prestigious movie awards, however, beyond critic acclaims or awards, its creators must feel fully fortunate that their film has gained a little piece of memory and love in the heads and hearts of millions and millions of people, perhaps, just like I did. We can breathe a sigh of relief, Disney pics keep to signify learning pillars for the growth of many people.

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Teen, 17 years old Written byUsrthea November 26, 2017

Very good and NOT a ripoff of the book of life.

Coco is unfortunately the last original (non-sequel) Pixar film of the decade and it’s the only movie I’ve really been looking forward to seeing all year so I had very high expectations for this movie and I was worried the movie might turn out to be average but seem worse than it really is due to my very high expectations, but fortunately it really did live up to the hype! In fact, I’d probably place Coco within my top five favorite Pixar movies! I also really love Mexican culture and I’ve taken Spanish class and celebrated the day of the dead before and I gotta say this movie nails the holiday perfectly! The animation is amazing and some of Pixar’s best. The colors are very bright and vibrant and are the best use of colors in any Pixar movie. The music and songs are memorable. The characters are great and can be relatable to someone trying follow their dreams even if their family doesn’t believe in them. I also love how when the characters play guitar their fingers are on the right strings and music we hear coresponds with the notes being played by the characters. The story is also really good and original. Many people have called this movie a ripoff of the book of life because they both are set in Mexico and are about a character traveling to the land of the dead and they both have a protagonist who plays guitar. But honestly Coco is actually very different from the book of life despite these similarities. Coco is about a boy named Miguel who wants to be a musician but can’t because his family has banned music because Miguel’s great great grandfather was a musician and abandoned his family. Miguel secretly plays guitar and watches videos of his hero Ernesto de la Cruz, the greatest musician ever without his family’s Knowledge. But after Miguel’s family finds out he’s playing guitar behind their backs his grandmother destroys his guitar and forbids him from playing music. But Miguel doesn’t listen and decides he needs to seize his moment to become a musician so he decides to sign up for a talent show for the day of the dead, but since his old guitar was destroyed he decides to steal a guitar from the famous dead musician, Ernesto de la Cruz. After stealing the guitar Miguel becomes cursed and finds himself in the the land of the dead and must get a blessing from his long lost great great grandfather before sunrise in order to go home. On the other hand, the book of life is a romance story about the rulers of the land of the remembered and the land of the forgotten, La Muerte and Xibalba respectively setting a wager for their worlds after seeing a boy named Manolo and his friend Joaquín competing over a girl named María. La Muerte bets Manolo will marry María while Xibalba bets Joaquín will marry María. But Xibalba cheats by giving Joaquín his Medal of Everlasting Life, which will make him invincible. Manolo dreams of playing guitar but years later, Manolo's dreams are suppressed by his father Carlos, who trains him to be a bullfighter to honor their family, while Joaquín becomes a hero with the Medal's aid. María is pressured by her father to marry Joaquín for his protection. María and Manolo both profess their love for each other but are interrupted when Xibalba sends his two headed snake staff to bite María and send her into a coma. Devastated by María's apparent death, Manolo allows Xibalba to kill him, believing he will be reunited with María in death. Manolo ends up in the land of the remembered and must find a way to get home after finding out Xibalba cheated and realizing María is still alive. So yeah Coco and the book of life have very different stories and characters and the few similarities they do have are not copyrighted, anyone has the right to make a story about the day of the dead or have a main character who plays guitar. Also the book of life came out in 2014 and even though Coco came out in 2017 the idea for Coco was pitched to Pixar in 2010 so by the time the book of life came out Coco would’ve already been several years into production and therefore couldn’t of taken inspiration from the book of life. The similarities between Coco and the the book of life are pure coincidences. Overall, Coco is one the best Pixar films of the decade and I highly recommend you don’t pass on it due to it’s similarities with the book of life. As for the content in the movie, there’s a fair amount of drinking in the movie though no one gets drunk. Characters drink from shot glasses but it’s never actually said what’s in the shot glasses. (spoilers!) a character poisons another character’s drink to kill him so he can steal his guitar and songs, but this might be over some younger kid’s heads. The only instance of violence is a giant bell falling on to a character and killing him (twice) and that’s basically it. This movie should fine for kids 6+ Who aren’t sensitive. EDIT: I want to make it clear that I don’t think the book of life is a bad movie, I actually think it’s very good. But I just felt the need to point out the differences between Coco and the book of life after a number of people I know (including my sister) refused to give Coco a chance because they thought it was a ripoff of the book of life, which it’s definitely not!

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Teen, 14 years old Written byNadia Cloud March 20, 2018

Really beautiful film but very scary for minors.

Coco was an amazing film. Had a great storyline, outstanding imagery, and compelling characters. I think that kids should not watch it because it is very dark and scary and a character dies from drinking alcohol. I definitely recommend this to people 17 and up.

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Teen, 13 years old Written byKierson March 9, 2018

Okay

The kid's acting, I would give a 2 or 3 of 5 just because I can see myself being stiff watching this movie. I think the kid should have more charisma into going into this.

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Teen, 14 years old Written byHgfbmuigmi March 7, 2018

Quite disappointing, gets too much credit from viewers in my opinion.

Okay, first off, let's talk about the Frozen short that everybody is complaining about: Olaf's Frozen Adventure. Olaf's Frozen Adventure is something I enjoyed, to be honest. It didn't take away from my excitement for the film itself and it was very sweet in my opinion, even though it did drag on for more than it had to. I would watch it again, paying the same price I paid to see Coco. The music was great, as expected. I was humming it when I walked out of the theater. Okay, the main event. Coco. Just to be clear, I'm not a hyper-sensitive kid. But there were times when I found the movie a little too dark. Also, no, I didn't like the movie, but that doesn't mean I walked in thinking I was going to hate it. I'm a BIG Disney fan. I had been waiting for this film for MONTHS. I was very excited to see it, and thought for sure it would be a good movie. So let's talk about the good. This movie, like most Disney movies, sets the mood very quickly. If Frozen got you in the winter-y mood, that wouldn't affect this. In the first few seconds, the film definitely feels Mexican. It also has a very nice plot that was almost perfectly structured. And the music, as always, was amazing, same as the animation. About what you'd expect from Disney and Pixar. However, it's all about the execution, and here's what I didn't like about the film. First of all, Miguel's family is basically what you'll be seeing for the first few minutes of the movie, and they do not leave a good impression. They're shown to be very mean and possibly emotionally abusive. Not likable characters at all, and definitely went overboard. Second, Miguel isn't a perfect protagonist, which I greatly respect, but he does steal a guitar from a museum. This doesn't bother me too much, but somehow, playing said guitar makes him half-dead. Why? I don't remember the movie explaining it ONCE. I'm assuming it's just like how riding the surfboard got Mac and Brady into Wet Side Story in the Disney Channel Original Film, Teen Beach Movie. Not a very good element, but it worked for Teen Beach Movie, so I let it slide. After this, the movie is extremely drawn out. Warning: you WILL get bored after all the exposition has been covered. Just like the short before the movie, it definitely drags on. And yes, just like any Disney film, there's humor. Did I find it funny? No, no I did not. A lot of it was dark humor and just wasn't funny at all, or referenced something from the beginning of the film, which I didn't laugh at because I didn't notice it to begin with. What's scary about this film? Well, thinking about how I would have seen it as a child, almost nothing. But then you have the "big reveal" (spoilers). So, the character that was made out to be Miguel's great-great-grandfather all along actually wasn't (*sarcasm* shocker...) and actually poisoned the character who was made out to be the "tag-along-friend" for the whole movie when they were both living. At this point, I was just watching the movie, like, poison isn't uncommon in TV and movies, so I wasn't really surprised, but then they show a flashback. This flashback, I think, went a little too far for the PG rating. I think it deserves an Extreme-PG rating or something, because this will scare kids. In said flashback, this one character is poisoned (as mentioned previously) and the movie shows him collapsing onto the ground as the flashback fades out and transitions back into the movie. I think that if I saw this when I was a kid under the age of 10, I would have been scared. I'm almost certain of that, actually. The reason why is because I remember seeing a Sailor Moon Stars episode when I was 9 or 10 that had all the sailor guardians trapped in worlds where they would fight Nehelenia and be weakened to the point where they couldn't fight anymore and could be trapped in mirrors. I was fine until I had to watch each character collapse by twos. It genuinely scared me; it's too much for anyone that age. So the movie clearly goes a little too far here. After an epic battle to start the climax of the movie (I have nothing to say about this, it's very well done), Miguel returns to the living world and immediately grabs the guitar from the museum and runs towards his house. Here, I thought "oh, he's going to play 'Remember Me'! What a nice conclusion." And that's not what happened. He ran to his house and begged for his great-grandmother to remember her father instead of playing the song on the guitar that he just STOLE, which would have made her remember. This carries on for far too long, and by the time he actually plays the song, the scene loses its effect and just feels forced. Everything from here on out is perfectly done. The movie would have been much better if it had good pacing and knew when it was going too far. What I do admire about this film is that the message isn't "believe in yourself" or "follow your dreams" or anything like that. It starts out that way, but then, surprisingly, takes a turn and instead the message is "you should follow your dreams...but sometimes there are more important things", "more important things" meaning family and friends. I was really impressed with this. It's too bad the rest of the movie didn't impress me as well. I would also like to add that, in addition to all the amazing animation in this movie, every single one of the notes and chords played on any guitar is correct. This is the first movie to do this and it really impressed me.

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Kid, 11 years old February 24, 2018

Awesome movie!!!

(spoiler alert) Really good movie! I loved it! It has some drinking/drugs/smoking, but it's not too much for a 7 year old or older. It doesn't have any sex or bad language, but it is violent. It isn't too violent for 7 year olds or older, but I wouldn't recommend it for anyone younger. It's an exciting, fun movie with creative Dia de los Muertos decorations in the background. It doesn't have scary halloween skeletons that give you nightmares, but nice, Day of the Dead Mexican skeletons that just want to party. There is one part where one person poisons wine for another person on purpose, and another part where he tries to kill a little kid by throwing him off a balcony. But not much else. It does have good messages, though. I really loved it and would recommend it to kids and adults 7 and up.

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Kid, 10 years old January 24, 2018
Beautiful animation! Very colorful and bright, the imagery isn't as scary as it sounds, and pretty funny! Teaches messages of family, doing what you love, support, and more! One part is a little dark for a kid's show, and that is a murder by poison shown, but it's pixar, and it's still a great show! Highly recommend it! My rating: PG for brief scenes of violence, comical fighting, and brief romance.

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Teen, 17 years old Written byAlexander Belaun. April 19, 2018

The best Disney/Pixar movie i've ever seen!!

The movie was very good, i think a lot of people LOVED the movie. I almost went out of the theather because of the Frozen clip, because i thought i got the wrong room!! It was great. I do not recomend to watch it with sensitive kids. It's really sad.

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Kid, 11 years old April 2, 2018

AMAZING

soo heartwarming

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Teen, 13 years old Written byMrMason2004 March 3, 2018

Amazing Film

A great film from Pixar! It made me nearly cry twice.

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Teen, 14 years old Written byChloe.crowder March 3, 2018

Ok movie

Wasn’t my favorite may be of interest to the younger folks but very age appropriate movie

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Kid, 9 years old February 2, 2018

Amazing coco

It is great

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Kid, 12 years old April 4, 2018

Amazing movie!

Pixar truly never disappoints. Coco is such a wonderful film. It has a great storyline, great characters, excellent music, and beautiful animation! It also educates non-Mexican viewers about Mexican culture, and many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans have praised Coco for its accurate representation of their culture. In particular, I was impressed with the scene where the main character, Miguel, watches his favorite musician play the guitar attempts to learn every bit of the song he's playing on guitar. As a musician, I was very impressed with the care that the animators took to make sure the chords were exact. The voice acting in this movie is amazing, especially from newcomer Anthony Gonzalez, who has a bright future ahead of him. I didn't think this movie was scary at all, but it is pretty sad, so if your kid isn't fond of sad movies, then this movie isn't for them. The message is great, and not at all the generic "follow your dreams and don't let anything stop you!" message I was expecting. All in all, see this movie!

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