Kid reviews for Coco

Common Sense says

Stunningly animated, poignant tribute to family and culture.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 113 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 89 reviews
Kid, 9 years old March 16, 2018

Wonderfully animated film may be scary for sensitive kids

I saw Coco with my sister and dad and all three of us loved it! Coco is about a boy named Miguel who loves music and playing instruments, but whose family isn’t supportive of his dream to become a musician. It has some elements that you’ll see in any typical Disney movie, but it goes deeper and has more depth than some other fairy-tale or Disney adaptations. The movie was amazingly animated, and some of the visual effects onscreen were out- of -this -world, just positively breathtaking. I am not usually a huge Disney fan unlike some other people I know, but I will admit that this is one of my favorite 2017 movies. Coco won the 2018 Oscar for best animated and I think this movie deserved that award, for both the plot and the animation. There are some bad reviews on this site about Coco, but any negative reviews are wrong! I respect the idea that everyone’s opinions should be respected, but I can’t come up with even one reason why someone wouldn’t like Coco. Parents should know that the mature content includes some drinking, about 3 out of 5, flashbacks to a murder (by poisoning), and the fact that the family in the movie is not supportive of their son’s dream might be upsetting to sensitive viewers or movie viewers under 7+. So if your kid is sensitive you might want to wait until a) they are older b)Coco comes out on DVD, c)the kid is more mature. But if your kid is interested in this film, I recommend that you let them see it if you think they can handle it. This movie is great for all ages, kids and adults. Some of the elements of fantasy, educational value, characters, plot elements, and animation may not appeal to adults at beginning, but once you learn more about Coco the appeal is so strong you’ll probably want to watch it over and over again. I am impressed by the voice actors and the animators who worked on this movie. The world would benefit from seeing movies like this more often. If anything, Coco is definitely a diverse film. Movies that highlight the Mexican culture in a kid-appropriate PG film that has some scares and suspense like Coco does, I definitely call diverse in a very good way. Coco is a stand-alone movie, and there really is no other movie like it. I enjoyed this film very much and I hope to see it over and over again. Now, for parents who are concerned: I agree that some content is mature, and may be more than your kids are used too, but you should know that the good content overwhelms the bad. This may seem a bit weird, but some of the inappropriate stuff in this film will be hard to understand for younger kids and they may not even realize it is inappropriate for them. Coco provokes many discussions and is something everyone should see.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
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Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 17 years old Written byPipeCine March 11, 2018

Death has never before been so alive

Miguel, an aspiring musician kid, runs around between colorful Mexican alleys with folkloric varieties of footwear, handmade by his family, who considers shoemaking business as the absolute job of each congener from generation to generation. Sadly, all his dreams will be interrupted by the unshakable family aversion to any minimum melody coming from an instrument; music has been radically abolished as a result of a fatal event of the past. Confused, brimming with different future plans and dangerously wrathful by the demands of his family, Miguel will be involved in a fantastic adventure, impressively deep, against time by festive landscapes of an enigmatic second dimension, one in which the deceased beings reside, those who remain semi-alive thanks to the memories of the living humans. Without any remorse, it could be said that the last Walt Disney Animation Studios & Pixar Animation Studios big bet took place almost one year ago with "Moana" by Ron Clements and John Musker, overlooking Brian Fee's irregular directional debut in summer flick "Cars 3." Almost 365 days of waiting provoked that the expectations to see the new original idea of the perfectionist studio were boosted without a break, and as they were unlocking fine details about the work, the audience demands got harder disproportionately. Needless to say, when the prior film raises the bar at a fairly high level, expectations embrace a difficult range of overcoming, the criteria for reviewing this audiovisual work were hardened in a way that it would only be considered really good if only meet the needs of the toughest public. To the delight of everybody, the newest incursion in animation genre by Disney doesn't simply meet the demands before a damn good-looking visual section, the best part comes from the charm of its characters and the substantial plot proposal that can be a long subject of debate and analysis. Computer animation has a host of genuinely creative possibilities. Over the years, thousands of silver screens have projected hundreds of stories which reflect the diversity of ideas and thoughts that can be extracted from a human mind. Within this interminable catalogue of film opportunities, the vast range of global cultures shines by itself in the visual field and despite the studio has tried to circumscribe most of its films in American environments, also gave free rein the screenwriters, resulting in small gems as "Mulan", "Aladdin" and, now "Coco". Oscar-winner Lee Unkrich and Seattle Film Critics Award-winner Adrian Molina seem to be consolidated as the kings of the present-day animation because, through the "hypothetical" inequality of years working in the field, they have achieved, in a magnificent way, to synthesize the characteristics with greater sensitivity and affinity from their previous works to use them in a plausible co-direction that allows the film to be what it is. Likewise, it was an outstanding job what they did with the general draft or/and the original story that plays a vital role for the success of the idea, in which it's possible to catch respectful and fresh reference parallelisms to certain functional aspects present in prior flicks such as the independence representation from "Finding Nemo", the overcoming of a specific problem in a gracefully dynamic way from "Monsters, Inc", and, of course, the most perceptible, an emotional and severe final message coming together harsh reality from "Toy Story 3." Additional to the aforementioned two directors-screenwriters, names of the caliber of Jason Katz and Matthew Aldrich stand out in the writing for their prestige and recognition in the company, leaving, as a result, an Aldrich-Molina explosive mix that provokes the correct working of the powerhouse script. Encompassing or synthesizing the valuable teachings of this movie is an impossible task, given that it drops them according to how the facts are happening, however, it's possible to notice edifying advises geared the unstoppable chase for a dream, responsibility that this act requires, love of and for the family, the reminder that evil still is out there waiting for an affable figure, probity, humility, the power of goodness and, of course, death. The latter subject is clearly the central concept with which the film manages to surpass some barriers, while at the same time, it's the one entailing a harder complexity. Although with the advent of modern ideologies and, consequently, relegation of the more traditional customs, this phenomenon has been shown a considerable decline, over the years, a blacklist on utmost-importance-but-sensitive-treatment subjects has been in the pipeline, themes that nobody dares to address, a series of matters which, for different reasons, are kept under an invisible but practicable veto by studio blockbusters and medium-budget movies, which prefer to avoid them because of the labile and perilous result that would mean a false step; taboos or not, these subjects would mean for any major film studio a daring position of "all or nothing." Homosexuality, political divisions, massive attacks or tragic events, social conjunctures, crude indecent language, explicit violence, euthanasia, suicide or murder compose a long list from which no one mentions. Now, if for an adult mind is really cumbersome to digest films of this kind, it's understandable that a young mind wouldn't endure even one-half of this content. However, in the case of this animated feature film, death, an openly polarizing subject at present, has got a subtle, clever treatment in order to capture, in a fantastic way, the truth hiding the loss of a loved one, using accessible analogies which stir up a proactive unique masterclass in core plot idea development. About this, the whole film moves with a comfortable margin among corny drama and circumstantial comical situations that achieve, within all that unreal and hopeful context, reflect difficult and pure reality, leaning, with respect, in the ideal Mexican holiday that fits perfectly with the leitmotiv. It's clear that what makes easier the excellent final cut is the charisma and the particular essence of the story and its characters, they are pawns serving as a bridge between message and audience. And, in addition to the fundamental role played by screenwriters, the subsequent movie weight lies in the vocal skills of actors, they must transmit a set of emotions and sensations through sound, through voice. Among the agglomerate of the cast, as well as the crew, unequivocally Latin names shine, which is its second greatest strong point: the opening to a new original culture. Anthony Gonzalez, Benjamin Bratt, Jaime Camil, Ana Ofelia Murguía and "Mozart in the Jungle" actor Gael García Bernal lead the mission of lifting their homeland up, their traditions, their voices, their needs, and now is the perfect time for a movie like this, one in which the Mexican territory is the setting for action; it must be heard not only by American ears but by everyone in this world, as an example of moving on, friendship, union; It is no secret that between country and country, hostile walls have been erected, for the moment "supposed", on economic, political and social relations; the "Make America Great Again" slogan has stoked a dangerous flame of egocentricity and intolerance that threatens the lives of thousands of either legal or illegal inmigrant, and although it's a really serious bussines, it's applaudable that from an artistic scenario begin to give the first hopeful blows to break a full-hatred wall down. And "Coco", even though its story has nothing to do with this complicated conflict at first glance, manages to raise a short but grateful criticism. To sum it all up, the film works in many ways, keeps strong messages for all ages, each spectator can extract whatever it wants from an adventure that is consolidated as the animated motion picture of the year. Creatively, the film uses its tools in a way that exhibits the meticulous quality showed in the Pixar works. It follows the patterns of introduction and development evidenced in previous works, and although the most assiduous film buffs can feel repetitive this prototype, it's always estimable the effort to dodge the traditional through stories that transcend narrative barriers, unequivocally, through emotional scripts. While the first two acts are a complete enjoyment, the highlight is reserved for the final part because "Coco" has the luxury of having the second more emotionally disturbing and sentimentally dramatic climax in an animated film of the 21st century, only behind, no doubt, "Toy Story 3". It's overwhelming the set of emotions that an audiovisual extremely glorious moment can convey audience, one that has been fire engraved in the annals of cinema, one that will ensure the presence of hankies. Although for many spectators can feel it anticlimactic and abrupt, this ending combines, perfectly, with the atmosphere of the narrative, revealing vigor and longevity that Disney maintains to date. The visual section is a whole other story. After a beautiful graphic simplicity coming from "Cars 3", the studio goes back roots and decides to bet on sharply-meticulous landscapes again, using as tools bright colors, colorful textures and confections that are going to leave you open-mouthed, maybe, that's why many film attendees come to the theaters with each new release, they're aware of the dimensions of tidiness and the labor demands that the company portrays through its continuous masterpieces. In the same way, the sound aspect excels in counted periods, however, in which it succeeds, it does it in an unbeatable way. Although it does not reach near-perfect scores as Lin-Manuel Miranda's melodies for "Moana" or Randy Newman's for "Toy Story", the film extracts what can most of these in the drama set-pieces, undoubtedly highlighting "Remember Me" by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, which climatizes the most powerful emotional moment in the movie. "Coco" by Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina condenses a wide range of American cinema's strangeness and traditional elements, delivering the animated audiovisual work of the year par excellence. This enjoyable and deeply touching Magnum opus has reserved a gold place in the most prestigious movie awards, however, beyond critic acclaims or awards, its creators must feel fully fortunate that their film has gained a little piece of memory and love in the heads and hearts of millions and millions of people, perhaps, just like I did. We can breathe a sigh of relief, Disney pics keep to signify learning pillars for the growth of many people.

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Kid, 10 years old March 9, 2018

The best movie i have ever seen in my entire life!

Coco is an amazing heartwarming tale of a five generation family in mexico that hates music, all except for one boy, Miguel, who loves it. Miguel goes on a journey to find his great great grandfather to get his blessing and go back home after accidentally bringing himself to the spirit world. Definitely a must see and worth your money!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Kid, 11 years old February 24, 2018

Awesome movie!!!

(spoiler alert) Really good movie! I loved it! It has some drinking/drugs/smoking, but it's not too much for a 7 year old or older. It doesn't have any sex or bad language, but it is violent. It isn't too violent for 7 year olds or older, but I wouldn't recommend it for anyone younger. It's an exciting, fun movie with creative Dia de los Muertos decorations in the background. It doesn't have scary halloween skeletons that give you nightmares, but nice, Day of the Dead Mexican skeletons that just want to party. There is one part where one person poisons wine for another person on purpose, and another part where he tries to kill a little kid by throwing him off a balcony. But not much else. It does have good messages, though. I really loved it and would recommend it to kids and adults 7 and up.

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Positive Messages
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Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 15 years old Written byBRIXTON February 14, 2018

ABSOLUTELY AMAZING

This movie had so many positive messages (find it yourself!)

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 14 years old Written byDevilWarrior February 7, 2018

Great Movie with a very good message

This is movie is not too scary like some people say,is basically a message about how important is the family

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Kid, 9 years old February 2, 2018

Amazing coco

It is great

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Kid, 10 years old January 24, 2018
Beautiful animation! Very colorful and bright, the imagery isn't as scary as it sounds, and pretty funny! Teaches messages of family, doing what you love, support, and more! One part is a little dark for a kid's show, and that is a murder by poison shown, but it's pixar, and it's still a great show! Highly recommend it! My rating: PG for brief scenes of violence, comical fighting, and brief romance.

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Positive Messages
Teen, 13 years old Written bysinnarg December 30, 2017

Must see of 2017

This movie is one of the most beautiful animated movies I have ever seen. Not only that but it has a great story with some incredible twists that will just blow your mind. There is part of the movie were there is a talk about a murder and stuff that some kids six and seven might find a little strange depending on there level of sensitivity but that would be the only reason for someone to be scared.Even if you don't have kids or grand kids to take you should still see this movie because it is one of the great animated movies of the past few years, definitely going to be a strong canidate for the oscars this year.

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Teen, 16 years old Written byYuonghuao 2001 December 29, 2017

Best emotional films

Excellent movie, Emotional, Family, Holiday/Festival, Happiness, Sadness, Cultural respectful, Warm-up, Heart warming, Imaginational, Fantasy, Impressed, Hopeful, Respectful, Musician Traditional, Curiosity, Childhood moment, ECT. Following traditional festival This movie is so wonderful and I'm very like it and also this movie is so good that I can't describe with any words. If you haven't watched yet go immediately watch the movie CoCo This movie is referring cultural corner traditional of family moment. I'm highly recommended to watch it. Don't miss the magical moment of Coco is a great movie !!!!!!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 17 years old Written byJoseph Thomas December 12, 2017

The best disney film EVER

It's really Magical

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Teen, 13 years old Written byJye December 12, 2017

Love it

A very lovely heartfelt story which really touches the heart a sad one to but very nice it my best all time

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Positive Messages
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Kid, 10 years old December 9, 2017

#1 movie of the year

The story, animation, and voices were all fantastic. My 5 year old cousin saw it with me and he loved it.

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Kid, 9 years old December 9, 2017

Really good movie sad with a touch of scary

Great for families skelotons are kind of scary if your kids are younger

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Teen, 16 years old Written byMikey619mihi December 3, 2017

Pixar as always again made an fascinating film that not only kids even adults would love.

Don't worry parents just take your kids to this movie they will love it
Teen, 13 years old Written bySensical Shmensical December 22, 2018

Touching movie

Pixar’s best film.

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Teen, 14 years old Written byxQueen November 22, 2018

Coco

Such a beautiful movie from start to end. The characters, music, overall message, and even the touch of sadness all took part in genuinely warming my heart, making it one of the best movies I've ever watched. It's really great. Go watch it.

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Kid, 11 years old June 15, 2018

SUCH A GOOD MOVIE!!!

It was so heart-touching!!!! IT WAS THE BEST MOVIE EVER!!! A little sad, BUT SO GOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! YOU MUST WATCH THIS. In some scenes there is drinking involved but not in any bad way.

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Positive Messages
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 13 years old Written byTheLostPotato June 8, 2018

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Language
Kid, 8 years old May 19, 2018

Great Movie!

Not a single thing wrong except for words younger audiences might find gross or inappropriate.

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