All member reviews for Ender's Game

Common Sense Media says

Thought-provoking sci-fi adventure with military violence.
 

Users say

(out of 60 reviews)
age 10+
 
Review this title!
Kid, 11 years old May 23, 2014
age 11+
 

Game, but not a game. A movie!

I love the book, "Ender's Game" , and the movie did not disappoint me. Harrison Ford, once again, was amazing in acting and did an awesome video. All the other actors were just fine. There is some violence, but not too much to scare even teenagers. This film should please most people who have read the book.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 14 years old Written byMidori K. April 2, 2014
age 9+
 

Loved it!

I just watched Ender's game last night and it was way better than I had expected. Now it's one of my favorite movies. Watch the flick. You won't regret it.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Kid, 11 years old March 16, 2014
age 11+
 

Just Okay

This was a good movie, but not excellent. There is some mild swearing and violence, which could creep some kids out. Ender has a surgery where he screams and you see some blood. The aliens look very bizarre and creepy, and a fighting scene in the locker room can be a little disturbing. There is also a fight. People who read the book will definitely want to see the movie.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Kid, 12 years old March 4, 2014
age 12+
 

WORST MOVIE OF 2013 - EVERYTHING IS BAD.

Teen, 13 years old Written byronaldo7 February 22, 2014
Kid, 11 years old February 18, 2014
age 9+
 

Worthy for the Best Book Ever

Orson Scott Card's masterpiece book Ender's game is great. This is a little violent and har to understand.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Kid, 12 years old February 14, 2014
age 13+
 

READ THIS PLEASE

I read the book and to begin this essay I must state the obvious, the book was better than the movie. The book really offered a new concept and it provides a reasonable debate, the movie is not nearly as controversial. The timeline is also completely wrong. It is still a good movie but you should definitely read the book. The book also says that the main character kills 2 boys, while in self-defense, it is still important for adults to be aware of this fact and allow their kids to see it accordingly. Thank You
What other families should know
Too much violence
Kid, 11 years old February 8, 2014
age 11+
 

Compared to the book it was bad

The movie was good if you haven't read the book. It has a scene where ender kills a kid in the boys bathroom after being almost killed.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 13 years old Written bySocrates2000 January 22, 2014
age 10+
 

Wow... not as good as the book, but still great!

This movie was EPIC!!! As a person who only says "epic" when absolutely needed, this is a huge compliment. I go to school and ask my friends if they know what Ender's Game is, and I am always so surprised when some don't, as the movie seemed to be a smash hit. They left out some major scenes: Ender's friendship with Alai, Ender's rocky start with Bean, the Locke/Demosthenes plot, and of course the unforgettable fact that, in the book, he is 6 when he comes to Battle School for the first time.I would have wanted to see Valentine show her tough side, and the REAL way Ender comes across the Hive Queen (see the book Ender in Exile for the full story). I did, however, adore this movie for the things they did get right. For example, they DID manage his bad relationship with Peter, though I wish they would have expressed his constant fear of being like him. The positive message was kind of obvious: no matter what, you can do it (it being whatever). As for positive role models, Ender is the best one out there. He makes mistakes, but is always striving to fix them. The violence in the movie (more so for the books) is extreme. Children are killed by other children and there are wars with aliens in which millions of humans are killed, though there is no blood in either scene. There are people holding hands in the movie, though one of the things I adore about the movie/book is that there is no romance. If you want romance, go to the second book in the series, Speaker for the Dead, though there isn't much in that, either. Bad language isn't as frequent as it was in the book, though there is the words "crap" and "smart a**". This movie was a thoroughly enjoyable one (except for those few quirks that I stated at the top), and I plan on watching it again. Unfortunately (at least for those who, like me, have read all of the books and are obsessed with the Enderverse), there will be no "Speaker for the Dead" movie, at the author's request (at least this is what I heard). He claims that some violence can't be seen on the big screen (see the piggies disemboweling the humans). The books are a great read, though!
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Teen, 17 years old Written bykenwi January 20, 2014
age 12+
 

Very good!

I really want to interest about the movie from the entertainment.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Kid, 11 years old January 11, 2014
age 12+
 

Great movie, satisfying for a fan of the book.

I read the book a long time ago, and when I heard it was being made into a movie, I became really excited. In November 2013, I watched the movie and was not disappointed at all. It is just like the book! Any fan of the book should watch this movie!
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Teen, 13 years old Written bySnowyjoe January 4, 2014
age 11+
 

Enders Game Review

Enders Game has almost no inappropriate stuff, and only one swear in the entire movie! Violence was the only problem, with one scene showing a rat going through someones eye, and many scenes with fist fights and spaceship battles. Overall, Enders Game was a good movie!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Kid, 12 years old December 24, 2013
age 9+
 
I watched this at Olympus Theatres on my birthday and it was awesome!Some intence sci-fi violence.Some hand holding and insulting.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Kid, 11 years old December 12, 2013
age 11+
 

Ender's Game review

In the beginning, Ender gets bullies but defends himself by kicking the bully in the gut. They use the word "smartass". His brother, at one point, chokes him, and also Ender battles Bonzo in the shower, though we don't see anything except tho torso. Bonzo gets his head hit hard on the ground.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Parent Written byDJM45 December 12, 2013
age 9+
 

Very good movie

I took my 9 year old to see this, he is almost 10, I was concerned by the reviews and went to see it alone first. This is a film based on a book about the threat of an extra terrestrial species destroying humans. It is a great movie and is actually an antiwar story. My son thoroughly enjoyed it and I had prepped him for the 2 violent bullying scenes. The second bullying scene really shocked the adults in theater. My personal thought is the boy in question is older than my son so it was no worse than violence he has seen in some cartoons. We discussed afterwards and he though it was appropriate for younger kids, Im not so sure hence my 9 and up rating. I know the writer of the book has made this a controversial film but I enjoyed it.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Kid, 11 years old November 19, 2013
age 8+
 

One of my favorite book-to-screen adaptations of all time.

"Ender's Game" is a clever, thought-provoking, and generous sci-fi flick that will appeal to fans of the book. Violence is a bit mild, and the near-end is the only most violent part. There is a fight between Ender and another kid, and Ender pushes the other kid and that kid suffers in head trauma. It's a surprising, frightening scene, and gasps should be expected. In the beginning of the movie, Ender has something removed from his neck, and it results in blood. The only consumerism in this film is the source material, which is a universally acclaimed book. Expect some mild insults and language in the movie, including "smarta--", "crap", "balls", and "the Vomit Comet." Ender Wiggin is a brilliant and smart young man, and he really does knows how to do things. Plus, there is help along his way, too. In conclusion, Ender's Game lives up to its source material -- and is, once again, one of the best book-to-screen adaptations of all time...until The Hunger Games: Catching Fire releases.
What other families should know
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much consumerism
Kid, 11 years old November 9, 2013
age 10+
 

Nothing to worry about.

If you are looking for a good movie to remember, pick Ender's Game! I went yesterday to it, and I thought the rating was accurate. Parents, if you don't want you kid to observe violence, you don't have to worry. There are only two fist-fights. And which there is no gore. There is an average amount of violence otherwise, including one boy punches another boy in the arm, a whole planet explodes, and martial arts training. The language is not that bad at all. There is only one use of cussing, which one boy calls the main character a smart-*ss. There are tons of positive messages through the movie. One more thing, this will not give anybody night mirrors.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Teen, 14 years old Written byCWG1 November 4, 2013
age 6+
 

Surprisingly Amazing!

I went in with expecting something good and I got something great. This followed the book pretty close, but couldn't cover all of the book because let's face it we don't need a five hour movie, but what they did cover however was amazing. There is no sex, nudity, gore, language, or drugs in this movie however there is a lot of intense scenes of combat and/or military, but these are not bloody nor graphic. mature 6 if not 5.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 15 years old Written byiPunk November 3, 2013
age 11+
 

Tense movie stays somewhat faithful to the book

Ender was fighting, not for a confidence boost like most people, but to defend himself. When people fight back intending for it to be in self defense, sometimes people argue that they are the attacker. In the beginning, Ender gets into a fight with a classmate (the classmate started it), but when Ender put him to the ground, he kept kicking him. He said it was to avoid fights with him in the future. Which showed that he didn't feel safe around his classmates. Which was an issue for him. So he went to battle school desperate for an escape. There are some fight scenes, and some tense moments.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 15 years old Written byRhian De Questa November 3, 2013
age 12+
 

The enemie's gate is down

Before anything else is said, congratulations to Gavin Hood for turning such a difficult, plot-packed story into a film that still follows it well. Some larger aspects of the books are left out, such as Locke/Demosthenes and deeper relationships with Ender and the people in his life, and while difficult to portray some of the aspects of Ender’s mind, such as his unique and beautiful ability to understand the minds of others, the film does it justice in it’s own way and the acting for both the children and the adults is superb. Parents should know that while the violence and language rate is less than the book, it is still there and two children are beaten near to death, one with a spiked instrument and kicking and the other with hot water and punches, ending in falling against a concrete block and cracking his head. Little blood is shows but it is still ghastly, especially as both beatings are done by another child. Both children later die in the book but this is not said in the movie. There is some language and crude words also said, and Ender is threatened several times with death by other children, including his brother. Main characters consist of Andrew ‘Ender’ Wiggin, who is taken from his family (his parents, violent brother Peter and loving, compassionate sister Valentine [played by Abigail Breslin]) to be taken to Battle School. There he is forced into a series of tests that will not only grade his ability to become a leader and a brilliant strategist, but also to understand how well he deals with pressure, rejection, hatred and frustration. Throughout the film Ender’s physical and psychological trials are difficult to watch. While at battle school he faces much enmity but also finds friends, the main two being Petra Arkanian (Hailee Steinfeld) and Bean (Aramis Knight). While Petra’s relationship with Ender is larger than the book and Bena’s smaller, they both retain their characteristic qualities, though Bean’s own talents being on par with Ender’s are unmentioned. Ender’s fascinating road to becoming a leader is necessarily left out as the film can only be so long, but enough of it is shown that people who haven’t read the book won’t be confused. The final main character is Colonel Graff, (Harrison Ford), who is good at what he does - find brilliant children and train them to be loners and leaders. Graff cares very little for the children themselves, and perhaps the most fascinating thing about the film is the moral controversy people always have when it comes to war and ‘do the ends justify the means’ question that has plagued the world for so long. Enough justice is given to both sides of the argument that a viewer with an opinion on the matter won’t be disappointed with a lack of evidence for their side. Graff and his counterparts Anderson (Viola Davis) and Rackham (Ben Kingsley) have their job clear and simple - find the best commander, use him to win not only this war, but the possibility of all future wars. They use Ender’s gift of understanding for their own morally debatable purposes, which is probably the greatest element of the book and movie. With stunning visual effects and characters and plotlines not easily forgotten, ‘Ender’s Game’ is a movie you can watch without reading the book but is definitely better if you have. It is a difficult novel to make into a screen adaption and they did a great job. Hats off to everyone who made this movie.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing

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