All member reviews for The Brave Little Toaster

Kids say

(out of 15 reviews)
age 9+
 
Review this title!
Teen, 15 years old Written bycud May 16, 2009
age 5+
 

Uh.. I watched it when I was little but I"m not sure that all kids should.

This movie has a dark edge that can leave even adults moderately disturbed. One thing the common sense review didn't mention was the language. I think it's pretty bad for a young kid's movie: I know I noticed the number of times they said "stupid" and "idiot" and "shut up" when I was a little kid, because I wasn't allowed to say that.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Kid, 12 years old July 21, 2013
age 4+
 

You can never be too old for this classic, but you could be too young.

Some scary scenes that could disturb people, but I love it. When you feel silly watching it, try to get a copy of the original book, by Thomas M. Disch!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 15 years old Written bywho3697cares February 14, 2009
age 7+
 
Very dark for a children's film. But this is probably what makes it so extraordinary.
Teen, 14 years old Written byRarityQ June 28, 2015
age 8+
 

A bit traumatizing...

This is a wonderful movie, but it may give your children nightmares... There are some dark and scary moments. It's more enjoyable if they're a little older.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much consumerism
Teen, 14 years old Written byCharlietheunicorn99 November 19, 2012
age 9+
 

Good. Scary. Imanginative!

This was one of the best childhood movies I remembered! Apart from Stuart Little and Stuart Little 2, this was my only obsession. But this movie does have some negative stuff in it too. There is a scene which traumatized most 80's children. The scene was where toaster is in front of the master while the master is making toast. After the toast comes up, he puts jam on it and everything seems fine, thats when you see the smoke coming into the room. The smoke fills the room as a hand appears from the smoke and takes the master out of the room and the door closes. After that you see flames coming from beneathe toaster as a menacing clown in a fireman get-up with a hose and a fork tells toaster to "Run". After running for a little while, the clown turns the hose on and a tital wave of water comes rushing at him which turns into forks which try to stab him. After that we see toaster hanging over a bathtub filled with water, with toaster plugged in, in the background you hear the clown laughing all scary like. Then toaster lets go and falls into the bathtub-only for it to be a dream. The other two scenes are during the "B-Movie Show" song, the whole song is dreadful about how the appliances talk about how their dismemberment has left them crazy and insane. The other part is the whole bit in the junkyard. The song "Worthless" is one of Disney's darkest songs ever. So it would be best for you to watch this with your child before he/she decides to watch it on her/his own.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much consumerism
Teen, 13 years old Written bySilentDarkness July 16, 2012
age 10+
 

Good but kinda dark

The Brave Little Toaster is a movie I never expected to end up somewhat enjoying. My buddies told me to watch it because it was really awesome, despite the fact that there was a preview on one of my sister's Disney movies I found a little too cloying and a major turn-off. So, to see if they were right, I actually watched it on YouTube. And although it's a good movie, despite the cutesy cover art and title, it's not exactly what I'd call cheery. In fact, it's one of the darkest movies ever produced. The movie starts off as cheery as the title and cover promise with a group of cute little appliances (does Kirby count as cute?) going off to find their old Master, but quickly gets more edgy as you delve deeper. Lampy, for instance, gets struck by lightning and Air Conditioner gets so angry he rages himself to death. (Which is possibly his way of committing suicide.) Although you needn't worry-he gets fixed by the end of the movie, and Lampy survives, but it's not the best way to start a movie aimed at kids 4-10. Later on, we meet a mechanic named Elmo St. Peters who actually rips the motor out of a sentinent and quite adorable blender for one of his customers. Since all the appliances in TBLT world are alive, that means the poor blender is, too, and having his motor taken out is like having his heart taken out. Not to mention the fact that motor oil leaks out of the "wound". Mechanical blood, I presume? So, since the poor little guy gets killed, Toaster and his pals want to escape immediately. Then, a Hanging Lamp, shortly after giving Lampy his lightbulb, explains to the gang that there is no way out and everbody will be spliced into a hybrid appliance (such as a mishmash who is part lamp, part can opener, and part shaver) or ripped up like the blender. During this scene, a female tape player with an uh, spinning chest hops off her shelf and flirts with them and another tape player pops the eyeball off the fan next to him, as well as a shadow puppet that looks like a dagger being thrust at Lampy. This might be a little scary for some kids. They DO escape Mr. St. Pete along with the other guys (and in the case of the mishmash and tape player, girls), thank goodness-but that's not the end of the journey. Back at the Master's apartment (he's going off to college) they meet a bunch of "modern" appliances, and then a big fat lamp named Plugsy flings them into the Dumpster for not being modern like he and the others are. The Dumpster is a direct pipeline to Ernie's Disposal, a scrapyard that's just as bad-nah, worse-as Mr. St. Peter's parts shop. In the scrapyard lurks an evil junkyard magnet who wants to destroy everything he sees. There are hundreds of doomed junk cars who want nothing more than to be out on the road with humans again, but all of them will end up being killed by the car crusher that the Magnet takes his victims to. A blue car and a pink car are the first to go, and they basically tell you that they feel really worthless and like they've given up on their dreams. Next, a cool red muscle car (from KC Missouri) tells us that he basically loved cruising and traveling everywhere, and still had a shard of dream left. Then he gets killed, too. The whole movie long, appliances are telling us that some humans are cruel to them and don't care that they can talk, and the last reference to that comes from a sad little Indy 500 racer who tells us that he thought of himself as a winner despite not knowing where he ranked. We can only figure out that he was probably third place or lower in the race, because he wonders how close he got to winning and feels uncared for because he was scrapped because he maybe lost his first race. But he still sounds like he wants to be in another Indy and win this time. His dreams are squashed with him in the crusher, alas. Then, we meet a wedding car who's all decorated with a nice pair of bull horns. She took a Texan to his wedding, which sounds okay at first, but informs us that he was unhappy with his marriage. Uh oh. Given that information, guess which kind of car do we meet next? Yep, that's right, a big black hearse. As you can expect, he carried a dead guy to the graveyard. Therefore, the fact that they were smashed together implies that the Texan guy had gotten in such a bad relationship that he committed suicide after that wedding. The wedding car drove him there, and then the hearse took him to his grave. And to top it all off, that Wedding Car said his thoughts turned to home, meaning that he was probably marrying again since his old wife died and felt like he just couldn't be happy with another girl. Hearse probably became pretty traumatized over time because his job was to take dead humans to their graves. Seeing dead people like that probably gave him disturbing images of death, and he never forgot what he saw. Or, he felt like since he'd seen so many dead people he forgot about his own mortality and it came to him as a surprise that he'd get crushed. Ugh. Shortly after, we meet a woody wagon with a shark-mangled surfboard on her roof who tells us that she loved going to beach parties with the surfer who drove her. She feels that if she could only be back on the beach in California rather than being left to die at Ernie's, she'd be happy again. Worst of all is the last car, a pickup that formerly belonged to a Hopi reservation. His driver told him to his face that he was worthless and junked him, despite his being in near perfect condition. The Hopi Native Americans from his reservation all left him for Santa Fe and his job, to basically take the kids places, was given to a bus, who ironically is stuck in Ernie's with him. To make his situation worse still, he actually SUICIDES in the crusher. Oh my gosh. The cars being crushed can really drain the happy from you, because you want them to win. You want them to live. But you know they can't escape, because they have busted engines or missing wheels or whatever. They have backstories and are basically like people. They actually represent people society thinks of as "worthless"-the blue car represents a "blue collar" worker, the pink car is a once-beautiful model who's getting older, the muscle car is a drifter who has no home, the Indy 500 racer is an athlete-or in this case, a race car driver, who has an injury/disability and fans no longer support them, the wedding car is a bridesmaid/groomsman and the hearse is the undertaker/pallbearer, (roles in their respective celebrations that are extremely forgettable) the woody wagon is an aspiring surfer who never turned pro, and the reservation truck is Native Americans in general-despite being America's first human inhabitants, are often thought of as not important. Not to mention the flower and the scary clown. That clown throws KNIVES at the toaster and he chases him all over the place. Then, he says "Run!". The movie is balanced out by lots of cute humor and Blanky. (Gotta LOVE that blanket!) But kids may not be able to handle dark stuff, so you'd have to understand how easily scared your kids are by showing them this. It does have a nice message, that people shouldn't be looked down on becuase they aren't as up-to-speed, and that it's OK to use your 50-year-old toasters and stuff. Yet, the animation isn't so hot and it has a surprisingly huge amount of suicide for a kid movie. But hey, always gotta be some cons, right? So, grab some buddies, a plateful of buttered toast, and your cozy electric blanket for this good but morbid movie!
What other families should know
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much consumerism
Teen, 17 years old Written byBranislavDJ February 22, 2012
age 17+
 

Avoid giving to children.

This cartoon left scars.It traumatized me.It even created complexes such as feeling pity for most ridicules objects and crying if they break down or worst get smashed.It created such sick amounts of empathy towards objects that I might actually chose to save TV over dog in dangerous situations After that car crushing scene,I just bursted into tears,and my life has changed. I hate it till this very day,due its dark themes,and twisted psychology. Its one of those movies that are way over the top. I will be soon 18,and to this very date,I just cant stand but to turn off TV when ever I see it.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 13 years old Written byJulieJulie11 January 11, 2012
age 18+
 

no

I found this movie very, very disturbing, when i first watched this, it terrified me. there are so many parts that may be too scary for sensitive children. The part where the air conditioner blows up out of rage traumatized me
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much consumerism
Teen, 16 years old Written bysb1254 October 14, 2011
age 7+
 

Classic but intense

Oh man, I remember this one, It's touching but scary. Don't get me wrong this is a great movie but it can get intense, there are scary scenes that frightend me as a kid, mainly the nightmare scene, whenever that scene would play, I'd run out of the room until it was over. So if you want to see this movie be warned it can be intense.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Teen, 17 years old Written byToBreakFate December 4, 2010
age 6+
 

i liked it

it's a goodfilm for kids, but after being scared when a toaster and vacuum nearly get crushed after a long line of sad broken cars, they'll soon realize that appliances don't move nor talk. and that flowers fall in love with their reflections, then wither and die. kinda sad, really...
Kid, 11 years old April 5, 2009
age 9+
 
I agree about the clown. I am 12, and it nearly scared me to DEATH! I am a DUDE! This demon is extremely freaky. Even if you are mature, do NOT let the easily scared see this
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 14 years old Written byAnimatedDinosaur April 9, 2008
age 0+
 

Too scary for kids

There is a clown fireman in this movie that I was shocked not to read about in the violence review. It's scene is NOT appropriate for the age group this movie was made for. It appears out of smoke, with a huge red smile and green horns, holding sharp objects while looming above the viewer, then it leans forwards and urges to to "run" in a harsh whisper. I'm not joking, it made me cry for hours. It is not violent, but it gave me nightmares for five years. It is truly terrifying, and I didn't scare easily (I watched Jurassic Park, and Jaws as some of my favorite movies.) DO NOT make the mistake of letting children under nine see this. It scared me for life (so far).
Teen, 13 years old Written by2puppybop April 9, 2008
age 0+
 

nice family film!

brave little toaster is a nice,fun film fpr the whole family!
Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008
age 0+
 

Very Scary for Small children.

This is the "Eraserhead" of kids movies. But it rocks. Watch it.
Teen, 17 years old Written bynduns April 9, 2008
age 0+
 

A good movie for the family

But here's a recommendation, if your kids scare easy, have a parents watch this with them because there are some scary moments in this movie but nothing too frightening. I personally like the dark and depressing theme this movie has because it's very accurate with not only our throwaway society (And it makes us appreciate old appliances) but some of the appliances, cars especially, relate to real types of people. Also, the songs are the most unique you'll ever hear from Disney. Uusually, the rhythm is Disney is always beautiful and classical, but in this movie, you get a big combination of instruments and most of the time, a hint of funk which is weird for this kinda concept. Interesting fact: Most of the people who worked on the animations work for pixar now. Also, Jon Lovitz=instant win.