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Parent reviews for The Good Lie

Common Sense says

Heartbreaking but hopeful drama about Sudanese Lost Boys.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 6 reviews
Adult Written bygracel1 March 3, 2015

The Good Lie; a Good Film!

I was pleasantly surprised by the explicit Christian themes in this movie. Love, suffering, sacrifice, and faith in God's intercession are prominent throughout the film. This motivational movie is truth-filled because it acknowledges and promotes morality, virtue, goodness and beauty in all its forms on screen. In the midst of civil strife, the moral of the story is that good conquers evil, and that hope can always be found even when bad things happened to good people. The quote on its cover provides the viewer with truth, inspiration and consolation when it says “miracles are made by people who refuse to stop believing.” The film is also skillfully developed and motivated by and relevant to experience. Not only does it accurately capture the all too real story of the “Lost Boys,” but it does so in a compellingly authentic yet dramatic way. Although not many people can relate to the violent, horrific, and nightmarish childhood of three orphaned refugees, they can relate to their strong family bond and love for each other. The film remains devoted to its main characters, the children of Sudan, and accomplishes its mission: to promote awareness of their story that even in the midst of suffering, joy can still be found.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Adult Written byNaidagn December 30, 2014

Excellent story

We laughed, cried and had so much to talk about! I have personally travelled to Kenya and worked in a refugee camp and I am thrilled to have a movie like this to watch with my children ages 8 and 10.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Parent Written byBev R. June 18, 2017

Educational, optimistic for some, not for under 16

This movie is a good dramatization of the documentaries about the Lost Boys of Sudan but the material is far too disturbing for younger viewers. I am surprised to see the reviews here for younger recommended ages. In this movie we see soldiers of the Sudan civil war entering a village where children are happily playing. All the adults are murdered. The children have seen their parents killed and their homes burned. They hide until they can escape and then embark on a horrific journey during which they lose siblings to starvation and soldiers. There are scenes of soldiers chasing and shooting children. Perhaps if one sees these children as "other" it is possible to think of their tragedies are some far away depiction of death and destruction and not see the children as the same as our own. This is not true for children and parents of color, and especially not true for anyone who has experienced anything even close to this. There are profound moments of loss, grief and symptoms of PTSD once the children are adults. There is also optimism, joyfulness and a new life for those given the opportunity to leave the refugee camp, but that too is not an easy journey. For older children is is a great opportunity to learn about the world and its people, to hopefully feel empathy and compassion and it provides parents and grandparents with material to discuss highly relevant topics.
Parent of a 10, 13, and 16 year old Written byKaren S April 26, 2018

Fictionalized story handles a serious topic well

I like this movie and my mature 12 year old was disappointed to stop watching it because it was bedtime. I was looking for something rare - a movie about a serious global issue that does justice to the issue while still being something teens might choose to watch. I love documentaries, but many teens don't, so I really wanted a fictionalized story to engage them. The first 30-45 minutes of this movie are set in Sudan and include many examples of war destroying the lives of the children and teens who star in the movie. These scenes are not graphic (no blood, no closeups of shooting) but they are frank. For instance, in the opening scene, you see soldiers arriving and hear shooting, then see all the parents and people in the village dead. Later, you see a large refugee group diverge at a river, possibly hear faint shooting off screen and soon see the bodies of the people who went one direction float down the river. The children form their own group, led by a young teen who demonstrates amazing leadership and sacrifice. It is hard (and humbling) to watch the children suffer loss, thirst, hunger, and a long uncertain walk to safety, but part of the movie's strength is its ability to get viewers to care about the characters in this situation. Also, these migration scenes are so emotional because the viewer also feels the strength, solidarity and responsibility shown by the children and teens. After about 45 minutes, the movie jumps ahead in time and focuses on the now-young adults winning a visa lottery and settling in America. I found the movie heartbreaking, uplifting, emotional, humbling, sometimes funny, and interesting. Just make sure your teens can handle scenes of wartime and death, and can take in the duality of a horrible situation that leads characters to demonstrate impressive leadership and selflessness.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models