All member reviews for The King's Speech

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Quality

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  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
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Kids say

(out of 92 reviews)
AGE
12
QUALITY
 
Review this title!
Teen, 13 years old Written byKinbJune February 20, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

The King's Tedium

I have to admit, everyone else' review started to have an affect on me, and that's why I'm rating this movie 5 stars. I understood everything in the movie, but I'm glad I fell asleep in the middle, just in time before the excess swearing. I found it to be very boring though. It had great lessons, don't get me wrong. But I found that every couple of minutes or so, I saw characters staring into space (not when the King was trying to give his speech). I know they were reflecting, but if I had a nickel for every time something wasn't happening, I'd be richer than Bill Gates. I encourage all to see this movie, because it will teach many life lessons, but if you're looking for a movie where they're isn't one goal that takes 2 hours to explain, I suggest you move along.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Great messages
Great role models
Kid, 12 years old February 19, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 
great movie, and just because there is some strong language, doesn't have to be R. I would have rated it PG-13. great film, great messages.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 13 years old Written bystevenash13 February 3, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

The Best!!!!

The best movie ever!!! Some language but you should let your kid see it anyway. The good messages and role models and the all together greatness of the movie make up for the language.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 14 years old Written byWilliam C. January 31, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

The King's Speech is the king of movies.

it was educational... It was funny... I mean I am only 14 but this is the best kind of film for me. Although I think they could have chosen a different actress for Queen Elizabeth.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Teen, 16 years old Written bymardoggie2013 January 29, 2011
AGE
14
QUALITY
 

A fantastic movie. Film at its finest.

This is a wonderful movie, the acting, cinematography, directing, all incredible. There is a reason it got nominated for 12 Academy Awards! It's a fine movie that is fine for teens, there's just a lot of language used in frustration, not directed at anyone, as well as some smoking, which is condemned by Lionel. It's a wonderful film about finding your voice, everyone should see this movie.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Great messages
Great role models
Kid, 12 years old January 24, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

the movie that changed my life!

I have a stammer like the king, so this movie meant a lot to me and got me thinking. Lots of uses of f*** and s*** in long strings, but to help the king speak more fluently . Role models were great, with lots of funny parts, both adult and kid. A hit-on for an Oscar!
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 16 years old Written bymongofa January 23, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

Teens are fine

FANTASITIC!!!!!! I loved this movie. It is ridiculous that it should be rated R. There is language, literally 3 seconds of it throughout the whole movie. It does have adult themes, so it is a gamble that young kids will like it which is probably one reason they rated it R. Geoffery Rush should win an Oscar for Best supporting actor.
Teen, 13 years old Written byLilLill January 20, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

great for young teens and up

This is one of my favorite movies. It really shouldn't be rated R because the language isn't that bad, even though they do use the f word and the s word. It was a very educational movie and a great way for kids to learn how to overcome your problems. They only use the bad words to overcome frustration.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 13 years old Written bymasonlackey January 15, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

good movie

good movie
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 14 years old Written byBestPicture1996 January 7, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

Sublime period drama is a winner

It really is a shame the film's rated R because the profanity scene that earned it that rating is brief and very funny. The movie covers a topic that sounds dull- a man gaining control over a speech impedement- and it is an extremely fascinating piece of work, with Firth & Rush giving some of the best performances of 2010!
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Teen, 17 years old Written byRainy Day January 6, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

Kind of Overrated

“The King’s Speech” is a dry, historical drama, one that is thoroughly English, but never thoroughly engrossing. The script written by David Seidler is based largely off the inspiring true story of the Duke of York, whose year-long struggles to tame wild lisps and stuttering finally paid off when he delivered a transcendent wartime speech to an uneasy nation on the eve of WWII. The movie however, isn’t quite all it’s cracked up to be. Though it premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to widespread critical acclaim, “The King’s Speech” felt a little too much like award fodder to be taken seriously. From the meticulously decorated costumes (tweed jackets, hemmed trousers, monocles, and bowler caps aplenty) to its fairly predictable storyline, (“man beats odds,” conquers internal demons on road to redemption) I’d say it disappointed me to see that my expectations were too high, given the fact that the film is the Best Picture frontrunner for the Academy Awards. The most entertaining spot, I’m glad to say, is the acting. Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, and Helena Bonham Carter give a trio of great performances, but they’re strangely hindered by Tom Hooper’s complacent directing and odd camera angles. Perhaps it’s just me, but Hooper seems to lack that unique quality of a director who captures genuine “moments” in his or her lens. Never did I feel exhilarated, scared, moved, sad, or happy during the screening. The minutes chugged along, and I felt a certain distance, a barrier between myself and the events on screen. I wanted to love it- as someone with a speech impediment in real life, I wanted this movie to inspire me, to be meaningful and poignant in ways I could latch onto. But it never did I saw this around November, and since the past few months, my general opinion of the film has actually become more negative. Perhaps it’s because the film felt “old” and “tired” to me while watching it in theaters. Unlike “The Social Network,” which seems to thrive in new and very unpredictable cinematic waters, this is a film which is set in the past and seems to be meant for the past. I was reminded very much of “The Queen” starring Helen Mirren when I saw this, a “true-story-turned-drama” about overcoming obstacles that is more good than great. Don’t get me wrong. “The King’s Speech” may be wonderful to some people and some reviewers on this site. I guess it just wasn’t the movie I was looking for.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 17 years old Written bySynchronicity December 30, 2010
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

Riveting and rousing, but should really be rated PG-13 instead of R.

The King's Speech is one of the best films of the year, and certainly a contender for the Academy Awards. But this excellent, excellent film sadly won't be seen by most adolescents, which is the demographic that, I think, needs to see it most of all. This isn't just because it wouldn't interest them. (It definitely would; after all, my younger sister, who originally dreaded it on sight, ended up loving it!) It's because of the MPAA's ridiculous decision to give it an R-rating due to a quick string of about 10 f-bombs in the context of the Duke of York (and later George VI)'s speech therapy. Aside from some more PG-13 level language, the Duke's fanatical (but historically accurate) smoking, a brief death scene and some similarly brief discussions involving the other royal heir's affairs, the profanity is the only offensive thing about this movie. It's spoken so quickly that if you cover your ears, you'd miss it. Across the pond in the UK and Ireland, this film was given a 12A (ages 12 and older, about a PG-13) rating, which is much more appropriate. Besides the rating debacle, this film is phenomenal. Everyone is brilliantly cast: Colin Firth as the stammering Duke of York/George VI, Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist, and Helena Bonham Carter as the Duke's wife. Of course, the story's an inspiring one, and the morals of overcoming your fears much more so. I can't laud this excellent drama enough. Overall, just see it, especially if you're 12 or over. You'll be glad you did.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great messages
Great role models

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