Baby Einstein: Traveling Melodies

Music review by
Common Sense Me..., Common Sense Media
Baby Einstein: Traveling Melodies Music Poster Image
Upbeat, rearranged orchestral classics.

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 2+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

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What parents need to know

Parents need to know that these up-tempo versions of the classics will stimulate young children, but may wear thin for classical music lovers.

User Reviews

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Teen, 15 years old Written bydoomcycle1 April 9, 2008

one thing

ok its good for kids under 6 but i garentee you if you are a parent you may get an extream ear ache because like every little baby music it recwires no musical... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bypoopslapper9000 November 14, 2016

annoying

is annoying after a while

What's the story?

TRAVELING MELODIES is a new \"Concert for Little Ears\" from the Baby Einstein Music Collection. It contains 20 short up-tempo versions of both familiar and not-so-familiar classical selections played by the aptly named Music Box Orchestra. The CD begins with a swirly and peaceful orchestral tune-up followed by a cymbal crash heralding the beginning of Smetana's \"Bartered Bride.\" Compositions include a selection from Vivaldi's \"Four Seasons,\" and pieces by Schubert, Mozart, and other well-known composers. Standouts are \"Fandango\" by Rimsky-Korsakov, Haydn's \"Symphony 100,\" and Beethoven's \"Piano Sonata 15.\"

Is it any good?

The production on this album is clean and articulate; the musicianship good. But the sound overall is synthetic and thin. Many of the pieces have metronome-perfect timing reminiscent of a circus calliope. Listeners may miss the lower tonalities, and those expecting full-timbered instruments will be disappointed. This album will entertain young children while on the road or at play and introduce a sampling of the classics. But parents may prefer more fully orchestrated recordings with broader appeal for the whole family.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why these songs have become classics. What contributes to their long-lived popularity? What would it take for a song today to still be around 100 years from now?

Music details

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