Do You Like Waffles?

Music review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
Do You Like Waffles? Music Poster Image
Get a full serving of fun from this musical smorgasbord.

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 3+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Most of the songs are about healthy foods such as bran flakes and soup. There is the obligatory dessert song, "One Donut a Day," which at least teaches moderation.

Positive Role Models & Representations

This CD celebrates the little things, like having a tasty midnight snack or pizza bagels. It might even make kids appreciate their meals a little more.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that kids who love to sing for their supper will enjoy this CD. Every song is fast-paced, which should keep pace with kiddies' short attention spans. There's not really a whole lot of substance here; think of it more as cotton candy for the ears. Little listeners won't learn to count or say their ABCs, but they'll get a silly musical menu that's all about having a good time.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 16 years old Written byRosebud95 February 21, 2012
Kid, 9 years old April 3, 2011

BEST. SONG. EVER.

no problems no nothing! its exellent its fun and entertaining! all parry gripp songs are kid friendly (some have bad words) there funny and you know JUST WATCH... Continue reading

What's the story?

Singer-songwriter Parry Gripp isn't a familiar name on the children's music stage, and that's probably because he actually doesn't write songs specifically for kids. Instead, Gripp is best known for his faux-jingles that can be found all over YouTube. No surprise, then, that Gripp has also written real jingles for companies, including music for the Hallmark characters Hoops & Yoyo. On DO YOU LIKE WAFFLES, the lyricist cooks up two dozen quick musical observations for foodies...and their kids. Songs like "Dippin,'" "Garbanzo," and "English Muffin" provide a clue as to the ingredients on this album.

Is it any good?

Parry Gripp has the recipe for fun with Do You Like Waffles, a veritable feast for the ears. Each song, about a specific food, meal, or dish, is amazingly short (most are less than 30 seconds!) and might lead some to wonder if this is the beginning of a trend to satisfy the Internet Generation's ever-shortening attention span. Although some songs, like the robotic "Fried Chicken," are less inspired, many songs are so good you'll want to listen to them again and again. Just beware: tracks like "Hip, Hip Hoo-Raisin" will remain in your brain long after the short song is over.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about food and how it is marketed to kids. Look in a supermarket and try to notice the packaging colors and ingredients of foods designed for kids. How do they differ from foods marketed to adults? What about TV commercials? Do you notice anything special about ads for kids' food?

  • Can you tell the difference between healthy foods and foods that are marketed to be healthy, but are really not?  Begin with a discussion of nutrition labels and ingredients to move away from the marketing and into real food facts.

  • What is a healthy approach to food? Should diets be a natural part of life, or should parents set better examples of healthy eating? What is your favorite family meal? Does eating with your family make dinner more special?

Music details

For kids who love silly songs

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate