"Eenie Meenie" (CD single)

Music review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
"Eenie Meenie" (CD single) Music Poster Image
Dynamic tween duo offer up fun, kid-friendly single.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 36 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Instead of any mention of staying the night or sleeping together, this song keeps the romance on the dance floor. "You seem like the type, to love 'em and leave 'em, and disappear right after the song."

Positive Role Models & Representations

There is a bit of a noticeable role reversal here from most dance and hip-hop songs, with the guys complaining here about a girl's wandering eye. "She's indecisive, she can't decide, she keeps on lookin', from left to right."

Sexy Stuff

Any references to romance and sexuality are pretty innocent: "I wish our hearts could come together as one," "You seem like the type to love 'em and leave 'em."

Language

"Catch a bad chick by her toe, if she hollers let her go."

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this song keeps things totally clean even while talking about flirting and girls that like multiple guys. The lyrics shouldn't raise any eyebrows, except for the mention of the word "lover" quite a few times. Otherwise, this is a song that combines tween-friendly sounds with a pretty good message. The guys here are trying to talk a girl into being exclusive rather than acting like a player!

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bymusicgeek January 29, 2011

Good for ages 9 and up

oh no!! they said "catch a bad chick by her toe"!!! Oh no, oh no, i'm telling on my mommy!!!!!! ughhh, this website really exaggerates.
Parent of a 12 year old Written byafiforever13 September 11, 2010

Not recomened

The word "Shawty" is slang for a "sexy chick" kids can't say things like that.
Kid, 12 years old June 29, 2010
Kid, 11 years old July 4, 2010

ok, but it isnt a baby or a never say never

one of justin biebers few bad songs. its ok, but i dont really like it SO much.

What's the story?

Justin Bieber and Sean Kingston have paired up for two songs that will appear on their respective 2010 album releases. "EENIE MEENIE" is the first of these collaborations and has the pair doing what each is famous for: Kingston provides a reggae-infused chorus while Bieber picks things up with a distinctively pop hook. The two also helped pen the lyrics for the single.

Is it any good?

The concept of taking a kid's counting rhyme and using it in a pop/dance single may seem childish at first. But these two tween favorites not only pull it off, they also offer up a really unique collaboration. With synthesizers, pounding beats, and reggae rhymes added at just the right time, this song is sure to be an instant favorite for tween parties and school dances that require a hot dance song parents won't object to. But parents, we won't tell if you blast it in the minivan, either!

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about gender roles in today's music. Are guys generally shown as the ones who don't want to commit to one girl? What do you think of the role reversal here? Does it put women in more control?

  • Talk about music lyrics and what makes this song more appropriate than other dance tracks.

  • Families can talk about Justin Bieber. Has he become the next teen idol? Do you think he's a good role model? If so, why? Do you think artists that collaborate with Bieber become more acceptable because of the connection? Ludacris was featured on one of Bieber's hit singles; does that make Ludacris okay for kids?

Music details

For kids who love pop music

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