"Hell on Heels"

Music review by
Jessica Dawson, Common Sense Media
"Hell on Heels" Music Poster Image
Fiery country tune is mostly clean but has revenge theme.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

You have to give the ladies credit for putting cheatin' men in their place and taking them for what they're worth -- but, not really a positive message there.

Positive Role Models & Representations

These ladies stand up for themselves but bragging about being "hell on heels" isn't exactly the best role-model behavior.

Violence
Sex

Talks about sugar daddies and cheating husbands.

Language

"Hell" several times.

Consumerism

Talks about things that sugar daddies have gotten them.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this country song is a blazin' warning to any cheating husbands that these pretty and smart women will take you for what you're worth, laughing all the way to the bank or high-rise condo. There's no sex or bad language, other than the word "hell" in the title and a mention of a cheating husband. And although the ladies' spunk and strength is admirable, the song's focus on getting revenge is not exactly a positive message for younger kids.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old March 9, 2016

Great song!

I think this is an awesome song! I love this song! The Pistol Annies are awesome. It doesn't have a positive message ], but the message wasn't really... Continue reading

What's the story?

Bringing sultry harmonies, twangy guitar, and biting lyrics, new female trio Pistol Annies makes married men swoon and their wallets sweat with this sassy track. Miranda Lambert (\"Lone Star Annie\") and friends Angeleena Presley (\"Holler Annie\") and Ashley Monroe (\"Hippie Annie\") make up the threesome of fire-breathers and country crooning at its best.

Is it any good?

Country music gets back to its roots with Pistol Annies' "Hell on Heels." Lambert and relative newcomers Monroe and Presley sing sweet and salty on their single about naive sugar daddies and cheating husbands. Their rich country vocals and perfect harmonies could make them the offspring of Dolly Parton or a sister to Alison Krauss, as they each sing, "I done made the devil a deal, he made me pretty, he made me smart, and I'm gonna break me a million hearts." Stay away from these pistols; they'll break your heart and step on it with their stilettos.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about solo artists who merge with other artists to form a new group. Can you think of other solo singers who joined a group? Does it make you more likely to buy and listen to their new music if you already liked them when they sang solo?

  • Discuss the messages that come across in country music versus the messages that come from mainstream music, such as pop, rap, or rock. How do the genres differ? Do you think this song fits the stereotype of country music? Why or why not?

Music details

For kids who love country and pop

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