Here Comes Science

Music review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
Here Comes Science Music Poster Image
No experiments needed: This educational album is a success.
Parents recommend

Parents say

age 3+
Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

This band wants kids to learn the difference between fairy tales and actual science, so several songs are dedicated to debunking misunderstandings ("a shooting star is not a star, a shooting star is a meteor that's heading for a fall") and explanation of the scientific method. "I like stories about angels, unicorns and elves, but when I'm seeking knowledge, the facts are with science."

Positive Role Models & Representations

Science isn't seen as nerdy or especially complex on these songs. Instead, the pursuit of knowledge through research and experiments is presented in a fun and exciting manner.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this is an album kids of all ages will enjoy. Even though They Might Be Giants typically appeals to the elementary school set, this album packs simple and complex ideas into each song, so kids of various ages can grasp different concepts, depending on their age. Kids should also find the bonus set of five music videos helpful and charming.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byJozLOBLOB November 18, 2010

The best that Kids music as to offer!

Love love love TMBG! They have taught my four year old daughter all about shooting stars, computer assissted design, and much much more! I find that even after... Continue reading
Parent of a 3 and 4 year old Written bylaribrook April 26, 2011

Educational and just great music!

This is a wonderfully fun and educational CD that will help your kids truly understand science. My boys love it and it is in heavy rotation in our CDs at home a... Continue reading

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What's the story?

They Might Be Giants have schooled us in the ABCs and 123s and now, with HERE COMES SCIENCE, the band is back with lessons about numerous scientific fields, from biology and chemistry to astronomy and ecology. But these aren't your basic lessons about the Earth revolving around the Sun and the life cycle of a flower. No, that would be too easy for this band. Instead, Here Comes Science delves into topics like evolution, photosynthesis, and the periodic chart. To make sure they got all the facts straight, the band reportedly even hired a scientific consultant during production of the album.

Is it any good?

They Might Be Giants took on the gigantic task of making sometimes dry and confusing scientific concepts explode with fun and humor. If there was a Nobel Prize for best scientific album, this release would definitely be in the running! Who else would have the nerve even to try to make the periodic table exciting?

But the band goes above and beyond just entertaining, offering up concrete lessons that would make anyone in a white lab coat proud: "Carbon, in its ordinary form is coal, crush it together and diamonds are formed." The music videos that accompany many of the songs are beautifully designed animation that only add to the education experience.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how media can help with education. Do you think computer programs, music, and videos can help you understand a concept better, or is reading the only way you should learn?

  • Families can talk about how to tackle tough science lessons or other homework. Can you try to make a song for facts you're trying to remember?

  • Families can talk about the difference between fiction and non-fiction, science and fantasy. What is the scientific method, and why is it important for all scientists (no matter their age) to follow it?

Music details

For kids who love learning and listening

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