"I'm Eighteen" (CD single)

Music review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
"I'm Eighteen" (CD single) Music Poster Image
Mild reggae remix of classic teen anthem.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Thoughtfully examines the feelings associated with the transition from childhood to adulthood: "Don't always know what I'm talkin' about/Feels like I'm livin' in the middle of doubt."

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know this is a remix of an originally dark and somewhat cynical song about coming-of-age. Kingston's version is perhaps the mildest interpretation, with references to alcohol omitted, and a drastically lighter tone.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byclarence August 5, 2015
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008

What's the story?

Sean Kingston has given a reggae vibe to this classic coming-of-age tune. First introduced in the 1970's by Alice Cooper, the song will still resonate with kids nearly four decades later. Some of the lyrics have changed, but the feelings of confusion and angst remain the same (\"I'm in the middle without any plans/I'm a boy and I'm a man\"). Kingston's smooth and melodic style gives a lighter to flavor to this originally dark and cynical track.

Is it any good?

Kids who like music that's thought provoking but still easy to dance to will appreciate Kingston's take on "I'M EIGHTEEN." With synthesizer effects, a pop tone, and prominent bass, the song is a far cry from its darker rock origins. The newly added lyrics also fit in perfectly to the lighter tone, while not straying too far from the classic theme: "I gotta baby's brain and an old man's heart/Took 18 years to get this far/Don't always know what I'm talkin' about/Feels like I'm living in the middle of doubt." For the confused more than disillusioned, the lyrics: "I'm 18 and I don't know what I want," speak volumes on today's generation.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why Kingston's single was released on Super Tuesday? How does having the right to vote signal a milestone for young people? Families can also discuss why this song has stood the test of time. Groups as varied as Anthrax, Creed, and now Sean Kingston have covered the song in different ways. What makes this song so appealing? What do you think the lyrics say about coming of age? What issues have changed for kids and what remains the same?

Music details

  • Artist: Sean Kingston
  • Release date: February 5, 2008
  • Type: Single
  • Label: Epic
  • Genre: Reggae
  • Parental advisory: No
  • Edited version available: No

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