Insomniatic

Music review by
Kathi Kamen Goldmark, Common Sense Media
Insomniatic Music Poster Image
G-rated pop musings on the state of the heart.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 13 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

A gentle message of taking care of yourself and knowing your boundaries in relationships.

Violence
Sex
Language

"Crap" is mentioned in the chorus of one song.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that sisters Aly and AJ Michalka deliver G-rated musings on the state of the heart, from a teenager's point of view. All of the songs on the album are about relationships -- the good stuff, the bad stuff, and negotiating both smooth and rough terrain.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bypunkstardust May 1, 2009

Very disappointing

Aly & AJ's Insomniatic is very disappointing compared to their first album. Their first album was what made me a huge fan of them since they had su... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byParamoreFan09 January 24, 2010

Great tunes!

I LOVE potential breakup song! it has the best tune ever! one of my favorite songs!
Teen, 15 years old Written bynzrulz April 9, 2008

its good but...

Parents should know there is a word used that has not been described on here. In the song 'Like It or Leave It' in the chorus, its constantly repeated... Continue reading

What's the story?

In 13 polished performances, teen-pop-star sister act Aly and AJ prove that they've matured both as singers and songwriters. The lyrics are noticeably better written than their first album, and are aimed directly at the heart of any teenager negotiating the ups and downs of romance. There are the highs of flirtation, the confusion that comes with being caught in the undertow of sexual attraction while taking care of yourself and setting limits (\"With you there is no filter/to sugarcoat what you said/even though I like your honesty/it won't lead me to your bed\" on \"Blush\"), and the sadness and disappointment of breaking up -- all described in well-constructed songs containing G-rated imagery.

Is it any good?

A gentle undertone of self-esteem and standing up for yourself in relationships is refreshing, even on the more lovesick songs. Instrumentals, though overly synthesized for some tastes, are understated enough to let the vocals shine; the girls' singing is confident and lovely. Add sparkling, wholesome good looks and a whole lot of flowing hair, and you've got a surefire pop sensation.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about strategies for handling romantic disappointments. Sometimes relationships don't work out despite our best efforts, and maybe it's not really anyone's fault. How do you learn skills for communicating your feelings, then -- if necessary -- pick yourself up and move on? Families can also discuss how young artists (especially pop stars) create an empire for themselves. Is it enough to just put out an album? Why do young artists feel the need to create an entire image for themselves?

Music details

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