"Like Me" (CD single)

Music review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
"Like Me" (CD single) Music Poster Image
Sets the women's rights movement back many years.

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

The single message of the song is that if you're sexually attractive, most women will long to be like you. "From her head to her feet, like me (Oh yeah)/She's trying to talk like me/trying to walk like me/trying to get all the boys in the club like me." This reinforces the idea that women need to rely on their bodies to gain esteem and are in competition with one another to look the sexiest.

Violence
Sex

Girlicious is all about selling their sex appeal. The song's video is a set of dance number that mostly consist of pelvic thrusts and hip gyrations, not to mention the girls in the group are dressed in leather bras, hot pants, and garters. Some of the lyrics are explicit such as "If I had a stiff one/You'd be all on that (I'm on fire)."

Language

One instance of mature language, that's repeated several times: "Trying to get on the floor and shake her ass like me."

Consumerism

The group was created by Robin Antin, the same producer who created The Pussycat Dolls. Girlicious is featured on a "reality" TV show about their introduction into the music scene.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this female group created from the Pussycat Dolls' reality TV show is all about one thing: being sexy. The song is showcases the girls bragging about how good they look, and how some try to imitate them (which they taunt these posers for). In the song's video, they have super sexed-up appearances, with lots of wild hair, tons of make-up, and very, very skimpy "outfits."

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Teen, 13 years old Written bygreenactress July 9, 2009

No Song For Me

i love this song, i asked my mom if i could buy it and she said pull up the lyrics on the internet so i can make sure it's ok. Needless to say i didn'... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old March 31, 2009

I lost so many brain cells. And not in a good way.

Girlicious, is a terrible excuse for a band. As one of there songs says, they are stupid sh--! These girls' 'music' videos, are intended to get... Continue reading

What's the story?

You may already be familiar with the girls of Girlicious. For 10 weeks these singers competed on national TV for a spot in the group. The show, Pussycat Dolls Present: Girlicious, followed over a dozen ladies as they vied for the PC Dolls creator Robin Antin's approval. The final four winners became the group and this single -- exclaiming how sexy they are -- is part of their debut.

Is it any good?

Producer Robin Antin, who several years ago presented us with The Pussycat Dolls, has now set the women's rights movement back many years. After a single viewing of the video and listening to the song, you might begin to wonder if women had actually been granted the right to vote. You see, this single not only portrays the female singers as empty-headed bodies and good for one thing only (sex), it also pits women against each other in a race to the bottom. On a positive note, the single does have a good beat.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why female groups popularize sexist stereotypes. This song is all about embracing the superficial and being proud of it. With their super-sexy appearance, who do you think the group is marketing itself to: young men or women? Why do you think young girls would listen to a song that might possibly make them feel insecure about their body and appearance?

Music details

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