On My Way Here

Music review by
Jessica Dawson, Common Sense Media
On My Way Here Music Poster Image
Idol runner-up bears his heart and soul.
Parents recommend

Parents say

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Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Personal strength, optimism: "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger" and "I wouldn't change what I've been through/I'd rather try and fail/it lets you know you're alive"

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism

Obvious tie-in to American Idol.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this American Idol runner-up has weathered a few storms during his five years in the spotlight, and this album is his chance to tell about it. The content is a bit heavier than his past stuff -- talking a lot about love, personal struggle, personal triumph and purpose -- but the language is Clay-clean and sends a positive message overall about being true to yourself and taking the good with the bad.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byJedmaster April 9, 2008

A Fantastic variety of beautiful music

This CD is just fantastic.There are a variety of song genre for everybody.A great collection of beautiful music sang by a singer who captured the hearts of eve... Continue reading
Adult Written byJoy2talk2U April 9, 2008

Great listening..

This is one terrific album. So very easy to listen to. The many different musical styles and beats make it interesting and invite one to play it often. Excel... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byHilly November 11, 2009

Go Clay!

Go Clay! He is amazing!

What's the story?

In his first album since 2006's A Thousand Different Ways, Clay Aiken has shed the comfort shield of covering other people's songs to bearing his soul and singing his heart out about his own life. All of the 12 tracks on ON MY WAY HERE are originals and even host some heartbreaking lyrics written by Clay himself.

Is it any good?

You might wonder how long these American Idol castaways can ride the wave of pseudo-celebrity, but Clay Aiken is proving once again that he isn't planning to go away...yet. On his fourth album since Idol, Aiken sings about what he has learned, loved, and lost since his name became a famous one. He's older, maybe a little more cynical, and wiser -- and it comes through in his voice. "Everything I Don't Need," sounds like a lightweight version of John Mellencamp, with bluesy rock guitar, solid harmonies, tambourine, and hand claps. "Ashes" is upbeat with a modern sound, and "The Real Me" -- a sweet, sad confession about life in the spotlight -- shows Aiken's soft side that he's loved for. Some songs sound a bit Broadway-ish and over produced with Clay's theatrical flare and lilt, but "Claymates" will be happy to have their boy back with a solid follow-up to the chart-topper Measure of a Man.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Clay Aiken's success after appearing on the popular American Idol. Do you think Clay could've had the same success had he not been on the show? Do you think success and celebrity has changed him? Do you agree with the way the media has always portrayed Clay Aiken? Is it fair or unjustified, or does it just come with the territory of being in the spotlight?

Music details

  • Artist: Clay Aiken
  • Release date: May 6, 2008
  • Label: RCA
  • Genre: Pop
  • Parental advisory: No
  • Edited version available: No

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