Permission to Land

Music review by
Tony Hicks, Common Sense Media
Permission to Land Music Poster Image
Not very good or original -- teens can do better.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages
Violence

There's a reference to the protagonist not being content until the one he presumably loves is dead. But it's not nearly specific enough for concern.

Sex

Naked woman on the cover, song about masturbation.

Language

Some strong language, including a word that is seriously offensive to women.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Even if the song is called "Givin' Up," it doesn't nearly paint a bleak enough picture about the reality of heroin. There are a few other party references, none of which count as endorsements.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this CD isn't age-appropriate for younger kids and tweens. And don't believe for a second that just because The Darkness invokes every 1970s and '80s hard-rock cliche ever imagined that the CD won't attract your kids like a moth to a searchlight. Also realize that when The Darkness borrows all those hard-rock cliches, it includes the language, drug, and sex references, so you may want to check out the lyrics (on a site like lyrics.com) before you share with your teens.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Kid, 11 years old March 15, 2013

cool album

I love this album I have been listening to it since I was 2 not that bad my mum didnt know what the lyrics were until I showed her the Lyric book.Its ok for mat... Continue reading

What's the story?

The big questions regarding PERMISSION TO LAND: Does The Darkness mean it, or are these guys trying to cash in on America's big appetite for irony? The answer seems to be, yes, they do mean it. Unfortunately, the band isn't over the top enough to be funny, and certainly isn't original enough to be good. At times, the record does work musically. Riff-driven and simple, songs like \"Growing on Me,\" \"I Believe in a Thing Called Love,\" and the semi-sweet \"Friday Night\" are easy to like. But when a band writes an upbeat song about heroin, or throws around profanity that's seriously offensive to women, it's time for parents to at least notice.

Is it any good?

Even if the content of this CD doesn't bother you, the bad clichés might. "Love on the Rocks with No Ice," could possibly be the worst song title ever, fitting the record's worst musical composition. Be concerned that your children might want to join a band and start writing songs like that. However, there is one good thing to mitigate The Darkness' subject matter. It's difficult for anyone -- even teens -- to take it that seriously. It's not a record worth confiscating or censoring. But it might be worth a conversation with your kids.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the use of irony and how difficult it can be to tell if sentiments are real or if they are meant to be ironic. Also, why do bands push the boundaries for good taste?

Music details

  • Artist: The Darkness
  • Release date: August 5, 2003
  • Label: Atlantic
  • Genre: Rock
  • Parental advisory: Yes
  • Edited version available: Yes

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