Music review by
David Brown, Common Sense Media
Resurrection Music Poster Image
Formulaic production, objectionable content.

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 18+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive messages

Explicit depiction of ghetto life, selling drugs, and killing.


Sounds of guns cocking and firing, repeated threats and descriptions of violence and murder.


If your child treated or talked about women this way you'd want to seriously consider remedial sex ed.


Continuous cursing (f-word, n-word, abusive and threatening language).


Not obsessed with labels, cars, champagne or other status symbols.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

Refers to smoking marijuana and passing out drunk.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there are no surprises here -- the music is full of graphic images of violence and sex expressed in language you wouldn't use with your grandmother in the room.

User Reviews

Adult Written byjdaley617 August 3, 2010
Look, whether or not you are offended by vibrations that pass through your eardrum or not, you need to look at 2pacs message. He isn't glorifying any o... Continue reading
Adult Written bypimpinpig April 9, 2008
Teen, 14 years old Written byTheGoodGuy February 2, 2014

No Tupac for kids.

The deceased rapper can have songs that are very empowering and meaningful , like 'Keep Ya Head Up' and 'Brenda's Got A Baby' even tho... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byhalo127 April 9, 2008

Great album

Yes this album has alot of bad content, but common sense dose not know what they are talking about. Tupac's lyrics dosent promote the content nor does he s... Continue reading

What's the story?

As an accompaniment to Tupac: Resurrection the movie, this album offers only four new songs. The previously released songs range from 1991 through 1999 and, not surprisingly, they don't fit together well. The few new songs feature top name artists such as 50 Cent, Eminem, and the Notorious BIG, but don't highlight the best of their respective material.

Is it any good?

Eminem was inconsistent with his producing on this album, creating the positive and enjoyable "One Day At a Time," but then following it with the obnoxious and awkwardly paced "Runnin." Much of the production seems forced and formulaic. 50 Cent offers little contribution on "The Realist Killaz," which is not about killing realists. "Starin" Through My Rear View" and "Same Song" (originally released by Digital Underground) are good offerings.

All the tracks feature constant cursing, and most of the objectionable material has to do with guns and smoking pot. Overall, this album is far from being a must-have. Die-hard Tupac fans will want it, but it stands out as more of a money-making scheme than a strong creative project.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the explicit descriptions of the ghetto lifestyle. Help your kids pick out the mixed messages and confusing signals embedded in his music -- we hear blaring gunshots yet also about Tupac's love of community. Talk about what is appealing about his language, and whether they feel it is important or helpful for him to be so graphic about the world around him.

Music details

  • Artist: Tupac
  • Release date: November 10, 2003
  • Label: Interscope Records
  • Genre: Rap
  • Parental advisory: Yes
  • Edited version available: Yes

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