Return to Pooh Corner

Music review by
Scott G. Mignola, Common Sense Media
Return to Pooh Corner Music Poster Image
Subtle, melodious, and eloquent vocals.

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages
Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although inspiring, the songs weren't selected for their educational value so much as for their relaxing tone.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 4 year old Written bycaribbeandream May 6, 2009

Our favorite bedtime CD ever

This is meant to be a lullaby CD and it delivers as such. I play this CD for my 4 1/2 yo every single night. It is soothing w/o being too "new age-y... Continue reading

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What's the story?

Even those who balk at Kenny Loggins' immaculately groomed beard and his silly hits \"Footloose\" and \"I'm Alright\" will find a soft spot in their hearts for this album. No wind chimes here, thank you very much.

Is it any good?

This predominantly acoustic album includes such diverse instrumentation as mandolin, accordion and Celtic harp, and guest vocals by musical heavies Amy Grant, Patti Austin, David Crosby and Graham Nash.

Loggins chose his songs lovingly, having sung them to his own children over the years. They range from traditional and movie tunes to a new arrangement of his own 1969 hit "House at Pooh Corner." Other highlights include "All the Pretty Little Ponies" and a spare, haunting piano rendition of John Lennon's "Love." Listen too for Gene Wilder reprising his role as the master candymaker in a brief introduction to "Pure Imagination" from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the variety of instruments not often found in popular music; featured are the recorder, penny whistle, accordion, banjo, harmonica, mandolin, and Celtic harp. Each song has its own instrumentation, and kids could learn to recognize the sounds of different instruments and how they work together to give each song its own mood.

Music details

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