Scream

Music review by
Stephanie Bruzzese, Common Sense Media
Scream Music Poster Image
Rock icon reinvents himself with gloomy hip-hop CD.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Many of the songs deal with the artist's battle with depression.

Violence
Sex
Language

Refrain to one song, "Part of Me," repeats "No, that bitch ain't a part of me." Also, one use of the word "s--t."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that aside from a couple of swear words here and there, the lyrics contain nothing overtly shocking. However, most songs deal with dark themes that reflect Cornell's battle with depression -- pretty dark territory.

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What's the story?

On his new CD, SCREAM, '90s grunge-rock legend Chris Cornell -- frontman of metal supergroup Soundgarden -- attempts to reinvent himself as a more mainstream artist with a hip-hop flair. To help his cause, Cornell recruited hip-hop producing titan Timbaland, who's also produced records for the likes of Justin Timberlake, Jay-Z, Missy Elliott, and many other megastars. Lots of longtime Chris Cornell fans have dismissed this record as a \

Is it any good?

While any artist should have the creative license to experiment, one as well-known as Cornell should be darn sure such a drastic switch is going to work -- and Scream doesn't. Aside from the fact that it's just plain strange to hear Cornell like this, his vocals aren't strong enough to carry off the scrutiny that a less thunderous genre like hip-hop invites. Cornell's subpar performance even takes the shine out of Timbaland's typically solid rhythms.

Though the album is nowhere near as risque as early Soundgarden releases like "Big Dumb Sex," its overwhelmingly gloomy lyrics (for example: "It's been a long lonely road, I didn't know which way to go / You made my blood run cold, and filled me up with sorrow") will be better handled by mature teens.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how writing down your feelings -- no matter how sad they are -- can actually make you feel better. Why do you think that certain creative pursuits, like writing and playing music, can have a positive effect on a person's well-being?

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