The Block

Music review by
Jessica Dawson, Common Sense Media
The Block Music Poster Image
They're back -- all-grown up, sexy, and confident.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

"Twisted" implies masochism (see above), lots of playful sex talk, a few songs about being tempted to cheat on the dance floor, but not giving in "you make it hard to be faithful when you look like that."

Violence

"Twisted" implies/glamorizes rough sex, masochism: "I'll push you how you want it/just tell me where to pull/you want it harder/need it harder/girl it's how you like it" and "I'll come and twist it for you/I'll even hit it for you/I'll hurt you if you like it."

Sex

Lots of sexual innuendo, playful sex talk -- especially on the dance floor, but nothing too graphic: "Wanna be a big girl/got to prove it/with a body like that got a grown man ready to go," "Kissin' on you while the ocean rocked," "I'm gonna give you some grown man../I ain't easy/you gonna be workin' over time," "She's dirty dancin' on me" and "I'm gettin' hotter when she touches me with her fingertips..../I can shower when I get home." The song "Sexify my Love" is about "consummating," but has nothing graphic. "Full Service" is about sex with obvious metaphors: "I'll pump you up 'cause I got the premium." One other song talks about making a sex tape.

Language

Just "damn" a couple of times and "ass" once.

Consumerism

Reference to Dirty Dancing, Grey's Anatomy, Nike, and Sony.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Just a few references to drinking wine. "Put it on my Tab" is about buying a girl drinks.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that believe it or not, the original boy band has reunited, and this time they're all grown up. There's a lot of sexual innuendo and implications -- getting a dirty groove on the dance floor, making a sex tape, a little masochism, giving some "grown man" and "sexifying" love -- so it's not the pegged-pants-clean-quintet of yesteryear.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 4, 9, 11, 13, and 16 year old Written bydeenasuprema November 6, 2009
NKOTB is back, but they are not the bubble gum pop group we all remember. The majority of the songs on the block are associated with sex in one way or another.... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byi'mbeautiful January 12, 2016

GREAT SOUND

amazing technique

What's the story?

After almost 15 years since their last album, The New Kids on the Block have returned with a surprisingly solid, grown-up album with THE BLOCK. It's full of upbeat dance tracks and club bangers with collaborations from T-Pain, Pussycat Dolls, Akon, Timbaland, Ne-Yo, and Lady GaGa.

Is it any good?

Even if you weren't an NKOTB fan back in the day, (c'mon, it's OK to admit it if you were) you'll find yourself rooting for the grown-up boy band from Boston. Instead of a lame reunion on the MTV Awards, Jordan, Joey, Donnie, Danny, and Jonathan decided to do it their way, in the studio first. With contemporary synth work and their classic vocal talents, NKOTB has given something fans -- both old and new alike -- can enjoy and relate to, albeit a little bit sexier this time around. "Summertime", the first single, is a nostalgic, easy-beat mix boasting their still-sweet harmonies. The soulful "Grown Man" (with the Pussycat Dolls), "Twisted" (Timbaland), and "Full Service" are seductive, sexy grooves that stay in your head, and 30-something fans will get a kick out of "Dirty Dancing" when it refers to the beloved, classic lovebirds Baby and Swayze. A few songs, including a simple love ballad are more a taste of the old NKOTB for those still pining, but the rest of the album is a modern, sleeker style -- with club beats and all. Like fine wine, NKOTB has definitely improved with age, and they've proven they still have the right stuff.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the buzz that always surrounds a band "reuniting." In the case of NKOTB, do you think the majority of society wants to see them succeed or fail, as has-beens? Why? Do you think their style can translate into today's music? What do you think about a band who changes their style to fit the popular brand?

Music details

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