Common Sense Media says

Original, if nonsensical, hilarity; expect minor weapons.

Users say

(out of 678 reviews)
age 9+
Review this title!
Adult Written byOnamar May 7, 2010

It's rated PG you know

To all the other parents complaining about the content of this show, I have one thing to say: The show itself gives you fair warning. It's rated TV-PG, and the rating fills the ENTIRE SCREEN right before the show starts. And about "lump" I hope you're aware that Spongebob has been using words in place of swears for the past 10 years. (Barnacles, Tartar Sauce, Fish Paste, etc) Honestly, your kids probably hear much worse words than "sucks" or "frickin" at school. I know my son definitely has heard worse at school.. It's a fun show, much better than other shows on Cartoon Network like Total Drama Island or Johnny Test, which are just endless strings of fart jokes and crude humor. Looney Toons is filled with violence, Flapjack is much scarier than this show, most cartoons that are on these days are filled with fart jokes and brainless "humor." This is one of the best and most fun cartoons to come out since Chowder, honestly if you don't let your kids watch this, then they're missing out.
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Parent Written byrealistrach July 5, 2011

Get a grip!

I watch this show and Regular Show with my 5 year old all the time. I don't see the problem, my son is quite aware of what he is and is not allowed to say and there has been no problem with him using profanity of any kind ever. Both shows are really very funny, people get too wound up these days, stop policing cartoons and instead parent your children properly! Cartoons have always been notorious for edgy humour, that would be what makes them fun! Far rather these shows than the plastic, unadulterated DROSS that spews forth from the disney corporation. At least these shows have humour and imagination.
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Too much swearing
Adult Written bybloodybirdbrain March 12, 2011
Adventure Time is a call back to the cartoons of the 90's like Ren And Stimpy where imagination and orignality reigns supreme and it was okay to be a little risque at times.These days people are so fussed up about trying to protect their kids but fail to realize they will just end up finding out stuff on the internet or school. This is one of the most imaginative cartoons that has ever been made in a while.And kids should watch this as oppose to those sitcoms on Disney and Nickelodien where all they talk about is an all too real and depressing "fame and money lifestyle".
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Parent Written byKENG2013 November 29, 2013

This show is garbage

I find it interesting that so many people who do let their young children watch the show feel so compelled to bash the parents who raised concerns. This site is to simply inform others of what you think about the program, not to judge each other. If you want your kids watching this show, fine. No need to get defensive. If you care about what your children see and hear then don't let them watch this show. It's creepy and weird anyway. Some people don't care what their kids are exposed to. It's as simple as that. There will be no convincing those that like the program so I don't think it's worth debating. If you're reading these posts, you have the information; you know there are sexual references and questionable language. You just need to decide if that's what you want your kids watching. Don't get sucked into the parent bashing; that's not what this forum is about.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byKanemori August 15, 2015

From a former fan.

You know the old adage about the toad who will stay in water that is progressively heated until he boils to death just because it used to be comfortable? Apply the same. Adventure Time started out as a fun show that merely leaned towards adult humor or used jokes that would definitely be inappropriate without the visual context. ie:"Get those hot buns in here girl!" being used to refer to tree trunks and her basket of freshly baked buns. Occasionally it would cross the line all the way, "Which one of you mortals wants to mate with all this?" coming from a skeleton without any kind of reproductive organs and that inexplicably refers to itself as a beautiful mermaid, It is PG after all right? No. We go from that to frequent allusions to sex that aren't even cleverly veiled. This comes from Jake the dog explaining to a THIRTEEN YEAR OLD FINN, the fifteen tiers of dating . This happens after Finn's date with Flame Princess. He says: "Right now you're at tier one, which is hugging. Pretty soon you'll make it to tier two, which is smoochin' , you'll eventually make it to tier eight where she'll let you explore all nineteen feet of her beautiful stomach .Don't do tier fifteen." (Don't have sex, but all the other stuff is fine for a thirteen year old kid!) It doesn't help that Jake eventually impregnates his girlfriend, has kids of his own and is never around them albeit due to the fact that rainicorn-dog mixes age rapidly and "Don't need their parents hours after birth. " (Hooray for absent fathers.!) A later episode has tree trunks wedding . She invites all of her ex husbands and after all the hilarity winds up in the dungeon and told to preform her own wedding ceremony . She asks for advice from her mother, but turns around to find that her mother is french kissing one of her ex-husbands. Before that, she congratulates tree trunks on finding a new one (A pig.) and says that she her wants get under the hood and see how the bologna is made . The most unapologetic episode yet, involves Finn making out with a bunch of princesses to get over losing his arm(it has become a flower attached to a stub . As if they remembered that this was supposed to be a PG rated show, Finn only kisses each princess once and considers that making out.... except he doesn't because Lumpy Space Princess isn't satisfied with being kissed once, she grabs Finn by his shirt (He's laying down on the ground face up, )starts kissing him, we fade to black for a few seconds. We see our hero under a blanket with the princess he just made out with not too far from him under her own separate one. His arm grows back. Phallic symbol anyone? If you aren't bothered by loads and loads and loads of condoned, applauded sex for someone who has just hit the pubescent age Fine. I'm out of the proverbial water. and I didn't even get to the demonic and occult references There's spoof and making up your own version of a commonly practiced hobby. They do the second one. Overall, I could have viewed this as an effort by the creators to prepare kids for realities such as not having a father around, the prevalence of fornication in today's word, the consequences but no. They're applauding these things, This show is not good for any age. Get out of the water. It's boiling hot by now!
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Too much sex
Adult Written byB3noise October 20, 2011

Pay Attention

So it has come to my attention that many people think that this show is very inappropriate... if you parents took longer then five seconds to watch this show then you would know how amazing this show is and how you're wrong. I noticed that there was a-lot of people saying sexual content and things like this. The worst I've seen on this show is a kiss. And that was one time, other than that there were hugs off and on and kisses on the cheek rarely. So that's one issue down. The word sucks and frickin are no where close to bad language and if anything it's way better than them using the F word. Now onto violence. If you have not told your kids that violence is not the answer than apparently you don't know how to parent. Use common sense and realize if you taught your kids correctly then there should be no issue with them following these things. And if you still have an issue then don't let your kids watch it. And don't waste the CN network or FCC with your complaints. It's a waste of time to bother the CN network and the FCC has way bigger problems than the word sucks or frickin. All I'm saying is that if you raise your kids correctly than don't stop them from watching this stuff.
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Teen, 15 years old Written byDylan117 May 7, 2010

it is perfectlly fine for anyone over 5

this show is "safer" than Family Guy(which my friends 2year old watches) and funnier than 90% of anything on cartoon network to say this show is crude while defending any other cartoon is redicules also, the language like "frick" is there so they don't use the implyed word, it's like calling the FCC over "Dang, I dropped my bag", it's not smart and anyone doing it needs to realize that your kids hear and more than likely say worse at school, you aren't protecting anything
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Educator and Parent of a 11 and 13 year old Written bySycrosD4 October 5, 2012

Algebraic storytelling

In summary, Adventure Time seems to be a collection of fantastical stories that a creative young boy would tell his parents and siblings at the dinner table following an afternoon of hiking in the woods with his dog. Main characters Jake (John DiMaggio), a talking, shape-shifting canine, and Finn (Jeremy Shada; originally named “Pen” and voiced by Zack Shada in the original short), an energetic and enthusiastically virtuous 13-year-old boy, go on numerous wild adventures through the other-worldly Land of Ooo; and they encounter all manners of wondrous creatures, enthralling locations, charming characters, and frightening challenges along the way. These elements of the narrative are affectionately named and depicted. Such characters as “The Ice King”, “Princess Bubblegum”, and “Marceline the Vampire Queen”, sometimes make me wonder if the developers spent a little too much time playing Super Mario Bros. before executing this idea; and their simplistic-but-charming dot-eyed character designs do nothing to dissuade that presumption. Against all odds of mainstream animation green light principles, Adventure Time managed to climb to the top of the ratings by simply doing what a cartoon is supposed to do: tell a story about characters. The off-the-wall slapstick humor is there, mind you, but the fantastical world that seems to be constantly expanding and the narrative being told within is the true selling point. Most other TV cartoons seem to operate their episodes by a series of obligations (the obligatory “opposite day” episode, the obligatory “swapped identity” episode, the obligatory “unrequited love” episode, etc.). Adventure Time manages to constantly do what its contemporaries rarely do, which is surprise the audience. Mystery plays an enormous role in Adventure Time, and it is an element which greatly encourages the viewers to actively explore the narrative rather than passively observe it. Like many children’s story series, this is a narrative that is built to allow just about anything and everything to happen, but there are some recurrent lines of plot here and there. The aforementioned Ice King (Tom Kenny) is a recurring villainous character who doesn’t really fit into the villain’s archetype. His only crime is kidnapping various princesses from throughout the Land of Ooo in a desperate attempt take one of them for his wife. Finn and Jake repeatedly make quick work of the King, leaving him to his lonely state, freeing the imprisoned princess(es) and Finn receiving (usually) unwanted affectionate gratitude from the rescued maiden(s). The only princess whose affection Finn truly appreciates is that of Princess Bubblegum (Hynden Walch), due to his rather immature crush on the princess (who is five years his senior). What is always of interest during these encounters is that even though the Ice King is generally categorized as “The Bad Guy”, one cannot help but feel at least some air of sympathy for the King’s repeated failures at finding successful romance. While he does keep his royal hostages behind bars, he makes several polite – albeit pathetic – attempts at being sociable. He offers meals, music, and gifts to the princesses in order to keep them happy and comfortable, but to no avail. Soon, our two heroes race in to save the day and steal away another chance for love from the King. This almost seems to present a dilemma. Sure, the princesses are being victimized and should be liberated somehow; but is Finn and Jake’s repeatedly violent approach truly the best possible method, or would some form of diplomacy be better suited to tide things over? The King, overall, really seems to be more confused than evil. In the season 2 finale, “Mortal Folly”, the Ice King even went as far as to ask for Finn and Jake’s “blessing” so that he can properly marry Princess Bubblegum. This, of course, is met with hostility. In fact, this moral issue really gives rise to what I consider to be a great mark on Adventure Time’s performance review. While Finn and Jake – Finn more so than Jake – steadfastly maintain and emphasize their innate heroism, they frequently find their heroism challenged. I do not simply mean that they merely face several fierce enemies that are seemingly difficult to overcome (they do), but rather they oftentimes have to reevaluate the identity of their heroism and how exactly to carry it out. In the episode “Donny”, Finn and Jake come across a community of innocent “house people” who are being thoroughly harassed by a large creature after whom the episode is named. Rather than use their typically violent approach, Finn and Jake befriend the ogre and gradually teach him that it is wrong to pester the house folk, and that he should find other venues of pleasure and entertainment (Finn’s impromptu “empathy” dance, meant to teach Donny the value thinking of others before himself, was especially delightful). The two have great success at this, and make a new friend in the process. All seems well at first, until the dynamic duo of our story soon discover that the house people are now being terrorized by a new enemy even more hostile than the first. These new fiends are why-wolves (variants of werewolves, they are “creatures possessed by the spirit of inquiry and bloodlust”), and they aim not only to give the house people a reason to complain as Donny once did, but to wipe them out completely. Finn at first attempts to fight them off, but the lycanthropic beings are simply too powerful and too numerous to defeat. The why-wolves take a moment from the fight to explain that it was their goal to feed upon the house people all along, but what had been keeping them at bay was the very scent of Donny’s now-eliminated maliciousness (called “obnoxygen”). This scent is a deadly toxin to why-wolves and thus had been allowing the house people to survive, even though its catalyst, Donny’s persecution, caused them no end of misery. Finn thus finds himself having to choose between the lesser of two evils, and decides to encourage Donny to return to his debaucheries so that the house people may at least live. Bittersweet? Yes. Even Finn and Jake subtly acknowledge that. But it would be wrong to miss the cleverness of the conflict presented. While the stories of Adventure Time are rather farfetched and eccentric in their particulars (as they should be), they explore some of the most morally sophisticated situations I have ever witnessed on television. They almost seem to be directly drawn from a collegiate ethical philosophy class. Other moral complexities are addressed throughout the course of the series as well. The episode “Henchman” confronts the ramifications of self-sacrifice and juggling two conditionally conflicting moral duties. An early episode titled “City of Thieves”, explores the difficulty of maintaining righteousness amidst thoroughly corrupt company and the identity of guilt. Another early episode titled “What is Life?” examines the responsibilities of the creator to the creation in an almost Frankensteinian manner. The list goes on. It should be noted that, like most stories that deal with moral dilemmas, Adventure Time does not attempt to provide a universally applicable answer to these issues, but simply brings them up for consideration. Of course it shows how the characters within the narrative answer them, but the choices they make should never be taken as Gospel. Oh, and the show is mad funny as well. Unlike most children’s cartoons that root almost all their humor in one-shot gags and slapstick comedy, the humor of Adventure Time is delivered through its clever writing and the idiosyncrasies of the characters. Jake’s shape-shifting abilities are a nice shout-out to the tendency imaginative children have to envision their pets as having super powers of some sort. He also has musical talent with the viola and the ability to speak Korean (due to the fact that his girlfriend, Lady Rainicorn (Niki Yang), only speaks that language). Finn is dominated with many interesting traits as well. Ever since he supposedly “swallowed a computer”, he’s had the ability to sing in autotune without any accompaniment. He also dons a peculiar pointy-eared white hat which he loudly declared as being “awesome” in the original short. He also has the habit of using mathematical terms as interjections despite the fact that he’s terrible at math. What is truly fascinating about Finn, however, is how the writers dared to give him such a distinct personality, which is oftentimes frowned upon among cartoonists. Cartoon main characters, especially males, are typically formed into nearly faceless “everymen” upon whom the audience can imaginarily paste whatever personality they wish. In spite of Finn’s unique demeanor, he has managed to resonate with a very wide audience. Perhaps it’s because he handles issues that most viewers his age face in ways that almost always seem to be amazingly fruitful, if rather painful. Perhaps it’s because he is willing to say and do things that most his age can only shamefully imagine themselves saying or doing – such as telling a girl for whom he’s had feelings for the longest the he was in love with her to her face. Perhaps his hat really is just that awesome. One thing about the narrative that should be noted is that while the Land of Ooo could superficially be associated with other fantastical worlds depicted in children’s stories, such as the 100-acre Wood or Neverland, there are elements in Ooo that seems to hint at something considerably darker than their counterparts. At the beginning of the title sequence of Adventure Time, we are shown what seems to be a pile of undetonated nuclear weapons, suggesting that Ooo is currently in a post-apocalyptic state. Many other characters and objects throughout Ooo seem to be relics of a bygone era. The fact that Finn seems to be the only complete human in Ooo can also imply this. All other beings in Ooo are most likely biological anomalies at best. Princess Bubblegum, for instance, is a mish-mash of human DNA and bubble gum. Other dark elements include the nature of the aforementioned Marceline (a captivating Olivia Olson), who’s “dark” nature is rather ambiguous. Even though she is technically a vampire, she is never depicted drinking blood or feeding on living creatures. She even goes so far as to point out that she actually only feeds on the color red rather than blood (she is sometimes shown sucking the color out of strawberries and red bowties and such), and thus will only drink blood if necessary – but again, she’s yet to be depicted doing this. Finn and Jake at first consider her an enemy after she throws them out of their house, but later she becomes an occasional friend of theirs for somewhat unclear reasons. Many complain that cartoons of our day are just not very creative anymore. To an extent, I have to disagree. They are full of imagination, but the creative teams behind them seem ill-equipped to put that imagination to a proper, compelling, or engaging use. The creative team behind Adventure Time is not such a group people. Their thorough understanding of storytelling arcs, wonderfully surrealistic plots and art direction, brilliant methods of character development, and challenging thematic components make for what could easily be considered the work of a mad genius. To think that all this happened after a series of nay-saying from noted executives at Frederator Studios almost elevates it to the level of a miracle. I suppose this is just one more example of how one should never send a marketer to do an artist’s job.
What other families should know
Great messages
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Too much swearing
Parent of an infant and 9 year old Written byAJGodard June 16, 2014

Inappropriate sexually motivated and sexist dialog.

This show is full of semi-hidden references to content that is sexually motivated and/or sexist, and is inappropriate children younger than the middle school level at minimum. Some of the quotes I heard in just one 12 minute show were disguised by their frame of reference. "Give me some sugar, Baby," was uttered by a candy zombie who wanted to eat sugar and, "Get those hot buns in here, girl," was referring to a character carrying a basket of hot rolls. Maybe the kids won't understand, but placing these phrases out of context in a kids show normalizes them for a new generation, perpetuating a new cycle of sexism. Later in the show the characters participate in several games that are, at least, high school level in content. At one point they are playing 'Truth or Dare' during which a cupcake person is asked to take off his wrapper, which he does. At another point the main character sends two others into a closet for 'Seven Minutes of Heaven', and before the door closes you can see one of them twisting herself around the other one. Both of those games have sexual themes and do not belong in a kids show. It doesn't matter whether children have an understanding of the meanings or not. The phrases and behaviors of the characters in the show are inappropriate. If someone was talking and acting like that in front of my 9 year old I would call them out for their behavior. I think we should do the same for TV shows and movies.
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Too much sex
Teen, 14 years old Written byOliviaNub February 26, 2011

You'll either love this show or you'll hate it.

Parents: Calm down. Some of you have made untrue claims about this show. As for language, yes they do say "freakin", "sexy", "pervert","sucks", "stupid","jerk", and the term "shut up". However, Finn does not say " get your ass" as some of you have proclaimed. If your mind wasn't in the gutter and you actually took a good listen to what they're saying, you would hear: "Dude, get your axe, I'll go get mine". Anyway, this is a very fun and entertaining show for preteens or teenagers that has a ton of thought put behind it no matter what you dunderheads claim. The characters, plots, dialogue, and ideas are all original and fantastic, Just visit their production blog if you don't believe me. With this show it's one of those that you either love or hate right off the bat. There's no in-between.
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Kid, 11 years old June 15, 2012

It's FINE!

It is fine for kids 7 and up, kids younger than that won't get it. If you never expose your kid to the words "Butt" or "sexy", when will they ever learn? you can't protect your kid until thier 56. If you know your kid then let them watch it. So take your kid out of that plastic bubblw, hit "Read My Mind" if you agree.
What other families should know
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Too much violence
Kid, 12 years old May 6, 2011

A Fine Line Between Good Parenting and Being a Killjoy

Adventure Time, while having a few admittedly questionable innuendos, is a great show. It reminds me of the what I used to imagine and doodle in the second grade: Fun-loving protagonists fighting epic monsters and going on fantastical adventures through strange lands - I knew what a flamethrower was when I was 5, and my older brother said things far worse than the pseudo-swears used on this show when I was a kid. To off the show for violence would be capping your childrens' creativity a being a killjoy in general. While the innuendos and mild language might be a reason to keep the show from kids under eight or so, most kids by that age will have a conscience and know the difference between their fantasy lands and real life. Overall, it's a fun show, and while it's not the most innocent, it certainly promotes creativity, and can inspire an interest in writing and art.
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Adult Written byRockybalboa211 February 14, 2011

For kids 11 years or older

This show is fantastic. It's a quality cartoon which is similar to the memorable cartoons of the 80s and 90s. It's humor would be similar to the first shrek movie (adult humor is placed within the show, yet children shouldn't be able to get it). The only thing that could be considered wrong about the show is that it uses words like suck, crotch, and freaking. Yet, it's one of the few cartoon shows (or just show) that does not use the Lord's name in vain. The characters Finn and Jake go on adventures to combat evil and that's pretty much it. Yet, the storylines are randomly hilarious, and quite original. It's not mean spirited and it probably could be used to teach kids that they should always fight for justice and fairness.The kid reviewers below me probably don't know anything about cartoon animation or the process which goes into animation. This surreal show once again is very clever, and is in no way like "MAD" which is very very inappropriate for kids below age 13. I don't see how the characters are not responsible since they always complete their missions to help everyone and usually succeed in the process and make the lives of whoever they help to be better. This show is not like tom and jerry, since it does not have the amount of violence that was in tom and jerry. Overall adventure time, phineas and ferb, and Avatar the last airbender are probably the best cartoons out now.
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Too much swearing
Parent Written byFeistyboysmama77 June 29, 2013

I'm no prude, but I don't believe in showing my small child sex jokes.

My husband and I actually love Adventure Time - for our own viewing. We won't let our seven-year-old watch it. The violence, in my opinion, is very mild compared to other shows out there. What I don't like about it for my son is that there are moments of interaction between characters where all of a sudden, something sexual or inappropriately lewd will slip in. We have a value in our house of explaining anything my son asks about, and that includes questions about drinking, drugs, sex, etc. However, with Adventure Time, some of the references were, frankly, not things I wanted to explain. Characters leering at each other, making sexual jokes, making veiled references to sexual acts, etc. I am not a prude and believe in being open about sexuality - AT AN APPROPRIATE TIME developmentally for the child. I also feel pretty strongly that we should be teaching boys and girls not to view each other as sexual objects, especially at a young age. Kids are growing up too fast and are getting sexualized way too early as it is. In my opinion, shows like this don't help that problem. Yes, the references are humorous in the contexts of the situations in the show, but I think they are both confusing for kids and may also lead them to get curious about things they have no capacity for understanding at age 7 or 8. The show is absolutely very funny, very creative, very imaginative, etc. It is also inappropriate for young children as long as the sexual innuendos and jokes stay in. If they took those out, I would let my kid watch the show. Until then, it's off-limits in our house.
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Too much sex
Adult Written bycrecca November 12, 2011

This show is the best cartoon since Spongebob Squarepants.

Okay I am 20 and this show is one of my favorites. If I had a child I would let them choose if they wanted to watch it or not, but I watch it everyday. It's creative and pushes the envelope for animation on day time television, trust me it is much better than icarly and all that other crap your kids are watching. That stuff is the kind of thing you shouldn't let your kids watch. Adventure Time, Regular Show, and Avatar are probably the best shows to let kids watch if you want your child to make decisions in life based on what they want instead of what everyone else wants from them. It's all about happiness isn't it? Does the show make your kid happy? Let them watch it then.
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Parent of an infant and 7 year old Written bySteffauri516 September 3, 2010

Cute, hilarious show, enjoyable for whole family

My daughter Alina is 7 and absolutely loves this show! I sat down and watched it with her a few times, it's a bright, peppy, fun and engaging program, but I did have some minor concerns. I posted "language use" as one of them; now don't get me wrong the characters aren't going around spouting cuss words, but they do occasionally use words like "sucks" and "frickin". "Sucks" really isn't a problem to me, but "frickin", which is obviously too close to the F-word is completely out. I also posted violence because they do show weapons such as knives and flamethrowers in the show, but they do not use them on other characters or inflict harm on other characters. Despite the few minor problems, this show is on for us! Your kids will love it!
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Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Kid, 12 years old August 16, 2010

An imaginative show!

I've only seen this show a few times, but I love it! It's very creative and imaginative. Like most shows, there are mild innuendos, some cartoon violence and a few mild words here and there. But nothing a tween like myself wouldn't be used to. I really find it funny and odd, great show!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Parent Written byE-Newgate July 15, 2010

A fine cartoon

As a father of three, I can say that this show is perfectly acceptable, given the rating. PG means Parental Guidance, which means if you're going to let your kids watch it you should guide them not to emulate one of the main villains, as someone suggested their child may do. Although, if your child is going to follow someone who is often talked down about because of his role as villain, most often with words like 'nerd' 'dork' and 'patoot' then perhaps you should be guiding him more than changing the channel when a certain show comes on. Now, onto why I feel this show is acceptable to children ages 10+ to watch on their own. I watched looney tunes, the flintstones, jetsons, and all those cartoons they had running in the early 80s about men with guns and swords running about. Those were MUCH worse and more graphic than this, even looney tunes, something that is still on television nowadays, cartoon network even. However, there are a few things in this show that I felt were a bit racey, but I was watching it with them, and actually paying attention to this cartoon because it wasn't just nonsense for 20 minutes straight, and explained things to them that they may have misinterpeted. Though in most of these cases the cartoon sorted this out on it's own. The only one I had to talk to my boys about after the credits started rolling was the seven minutes in heaven, and they were going into middle school soon(one already is) and were going to learn this game anyway, it's where I did after all. In summary, this show is fine for all ages provided you're there to watch it with them. However if your kid is 10+ then he should be fine on his own, and has probably heard worse from his friends than 'sucks' and 'sexy' anyway.
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Parent Written byBustin1986 March 14, 2013

Junk tv, not for kids.

This show is just another slot of junk television that has no educational value at all. On the contrary it teaches our kids to be rude and unequivocally disgusting.
Parent Written bypinkred32 June 22, 2011

Stop and look with an open mind

This show is just fine. To wstsdgrl, the word was "sexy", not "sexually". While others may say there's no difference even if it was "sexy", let me explain that, when I was younger, I was misunderstood thinking that the word was AS bad as "sexually", which it's not. I would have rather not had that mistaken notion. To put into perspective, Ginger Spice was known as Sexy Spice in the UK. I don't think that was really an issue there and it shouldn't have been in the US. There needs to be a tolerance to certain words so kids don't get the wrong idea thinking somethings are worse then they actually are. That's virtually creating taboo for them, which sometimes increases their appeal. I grew up watching cartoons like Rocko's Modern Life, a cartoon that mentioned hell, homosexuals, sex and nudity. (There was even a place called "Chokeys Chicken" for a time) Now, did that turn me into a satanist/homophobic/sexual delinquent? No, I am an average open-minded, healthy non-violent person that has been able to handle adult topics since middle school with maturity and has never had "bad influences" in my life. This might be a preachy review that hardly mentions the show, but if there's anything to look at, it's that this show won't corrupt your kids. The fights are humorous and notions of violence will more than likely go over the children's heads. (These weapons are even fantasy based, which fits into their obvious none realistic world) The people behind it are great. I only wish more cartoons were created this way.

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