Dangerman: The Amazing Mr. Goodwin

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Dangerman: The Amazing Mr. Goodwin TV Poster Image
Daredevil stunts are exciting for teens but very dangerous.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series showcases tricks inspired by traditional vaudeville acts and magicians. The fact that skill and technique is required to perform these tricks is underscored, but they are not revealed.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Goodwin claims that he is driven by the desire to test himself and by the desire to gain the admiration of his (now infant) daughter some day.

Violence

Stunts include activities like eating broken glass, hanging off of tall buildings by a finger, getting slapped in the face, getting bitten by snakes, and being burnt or buried alive. The activities featured here are extremely dangerous, and can lead to seriously injury and/or death. Occasionally bloody wounds are visible.

Sex

Occasionally female witnesses are wearing cleavage-revealing clothing.

Language

Words like "ass" and "hell" are audible.
 

Consumerism

Chevrolet trucks and Minis are sometimes visible, but their logos are not obviously featured.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasionally tricks are done during meals where wine is being consumed.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Dangerman: The Amazing Mr. Goodwin features lots of dangerous stunts that can lead to serious injury and/or death; viewers of all ages should be reminded to never try them at home. The show includes a bit of iffy language and occasional background drinking.

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What's the story?

DANGERMAN: THE AMAZING MR. GOODWIN stars professional Welsh escapologist and One Way Out host Jonathan Goodwin performing dangerous stunts that require physical and emotional strength, speed, and bravery. From chewing and swallowing broken glass to escaping from a buried coffin after being bitten by a poisonous snake, he adapts vaudeville and magician-inspired techniques to enthrall 21st century audiences. But while he makes sure to have witnesses present to observe and record each hair-raising event, he never shares the tricks of his trade.

Is it any good?

Goodwin showcases a wide-variety of tricks that range from strange and freakish to frighteningly dangerous. He offers some brief insight into the mental and physical preparation that goes into performing some of these stunts, but unlike in One Way Out, stops short of explaining how any of them actually work or the scientific reasons he is able to accomplish what he does.

Some folks may find the show difficult to watch, especially when inflicting pain on himself as part of the performance. Others may question the motivation behind his willingness to risk life and limb over and over again, especially when he talks about his love for his family. It's not the kind of thing you want anyone to be imitating, but if you are looking for some nail-bitingly good entertainment, this show will fit the bill.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about stuntmen and daredevils. What exactly is an escapologist? What drives people to perform dangerous stunts? What kind of training do they have to have in order to do them correctly and safely?

  • What are some of the most famous daredevils featured in films and TV over the years? Did they have a signature trick or stunt?

  • Is it socially responsible to feature dangerous stunts being performed on TV?  What if these stunts are being shown within an educational context? Are you ever tempted to copy what you see on TV?

TV details

For kids who love reality shows

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