Funny or Die Presents America's Next Weatherman

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
Funny or Die Presents America's Next Weatherman TV Poster Image
Curious, deadpan spoof mocks reality competitions.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Caring deeply about what appears to be a silly job is roundly mocked.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Young viewers, and even some old ones, will be hard-pressed to figure out whether contestants and judges are in on the joke in this reality show. 

Violence

Fake wind, snow, and rain knock contestants to their knees; no one is in any danger. 

Sex

A few risqué visual gags; footage of contestants and applicants in revealing clothing or nude (private parts are blurred). 

Language
Consumerism

Real weather anchorpeople are featured; logos are frequently flashed on-screen and used in show props. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Funny or Die Presents America's Next Weatherman is a reality-show spoof that shows contestants competing in a faux competition to become weather reporters. Other than a few suggestive jokes -- weather graphics look like breasts, for example -- and a few brief flashes of contestants in bikinis or auditioning in the nude with genitals blurred, there is little here to worry parents. However, the humor is so deadpan, and the competition so closely mirrors "real" reality competitions with their trumped-up "challenges," that younger viewers will probably have no idea the whole show is a goof. Parents may find it amusing, as may teens with a particularly sardonic sense of humor, but this isn't whole-family viewing for those with young kids. 

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What's the story?

In reality-show spoof FUNNY OR DIE PRESENTS AMERICA'S NEXT WEATHERMAN, a group of aspiring weather newscasters -- some on the level, some goofing on the whole competition -- are gathered together to make their way through a series of weathercasting trials. Can they keep their cool when it suddenly starts raining or snowing? When the teleprompter goes haywire? When a bucket of bugs suddenly is dumped on them right in the middle of a report? Real weather pros Jillian Barbiere and Johnny Mountain judge their performances while avuncular host Matt Oberg keeps the competition rolling. 

Is it any good?

The jokes land often enough on this curious spoof of reality-show competitions, but they're so deadpan and dry that the show's likely to make you smile rather than chortle. Ridiculous reality shows in general, and reality competitions in particular, are ripe for mockery, and that's been done before, with Burning Love, The Hotwives of Orlando, and even 30 Rock, which had America's Kidz Got Singing. America's Next Weatherman is both less silly and a lot stranger; in fact, it's hard to tell if some of the contestants and the show's "celebrity" judges are in on the joke.

It is pretty fun watching contestants argue over what a comet is likely to do to your body if it hits you in the head or to witness them having to hold up weighted microphones as cup after cup of coffee is stacked on top. The whole thing is odd to amusing and worth a look, whether or not it's destined for clear skies. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about this show's premise. How can you tell it's a joke? Does the presence of real weather celebrity judges throw you off? Do you think they know this is a joke? 

  • Putting contestants through various types of challenges is a reality-show staple. Why? Why do viewers like to watch others under stress? 

TV details

For kids who love silly shows

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