Greatest American Dog

TV review by
Anne Louise Bannon, Common Sense Media
Greatest American Dog TV Poster Image
Competition shows off talented and pampered pups.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Clearly advocates the love of dogs and responsible pet ownership, including discipline.

Violence & Scariness

One of the dogs swipes another's skateboard, but there's no biting of people or other aggressive behavior.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

A few brand names, including Corona beer. Plus so many dog toys and accessories that younger viewers with dogs might get the "gimmies" on the next trip to the pet store.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The competitors toast the beginning of the competition with champagne, and there's beer and wine drinking (the glasses and bottles are visible, but actual drinking isn't often seen).

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this dog competition has none of the usual catty reality show behavior, making it age-appropriate viewing for younger audiences. But there's still a lot of excess on display: The competition takes place at a mansion, and one of the rewards is a lavish suite filled with dog toys and other items. Also, the line between spoiling a dog (as in treating it like a human being) and appropriately rewarding good behavior gets mighty fuzzy at times.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byThe JP Show June 15, 2009

Good Show

This should be like TV-Y instead of TV-PG.
Adult Written byRecessGymClass2 November 25, 2016

I remember this, it is no surprise it only lasted a couple of episodes.

I LOVE dogs, but this was just garbage. The tricks the dogs did were dumb, and did not make sense. It was just boring in general to watch. The hosts were annoyi... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old September 13, 2010

i LoVE ThiS shoW

I LOVE THIS SHOW,i hope they make Greatest American Dog 2.And i miss it so much.

What's the story?

GREATEST AMERICAN DOG is basically Survivor with dogs. OK, instead of a buggy beach, everyone is camped out in a luxury mansion -- except for one unlucky pair that will get stuck in the Dog House each week (a nice but small cabin that only a New Yorker would call roughing it). But it's still your standard competition show with folks trying to prove something -- in this case that they've got great dogs -- while vying for money by engaging in a variety of stunts that should show off their dogs' skills but mostly just look silly.

Is it any good?

As these kinds of shows go, this ain't bad. The competing dogs make up for a lot -- especially the skateboarding bull dog, Tillman. Even the foo-foo doggies have more to show for themselves than mere cuteness. But the owners will probably make you nuts -- seriously, matching shoes for a dog?! A Bark-Mitzvah?! In fact, the dogs that generally do the best are the ones whose owners remember that these are dogs. And certainly the dogs are the best reason to watch the show. Actually, they're the only reason to watch the show.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why competition shows seem to follow the same format: competitors living together, elimination, three judges, big cash prizes. Ask kids why they think people go on these kinds of shows and what they think the producers are doing to make the competition seem more intense than it is. Also, who's your favorite dog? Do you think he or she will win?

TV details

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