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LooLoo Kids

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
LooLoo Kids TV Poster Image
Gentle preschool YouTube channel has lots of classic songs.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Some videos teach social-emotional lessons such as "friends cooperate" and "thinking creatively can solve problems." In these videos, an unseen narrator with a soothing voice praises characters ("What beautiful houses you've made in a lovely forest!") or prompts them towards better behavior ("Have you forgotten something, Rosie?"). 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Classic songs make up the majority of the channel's content; some characters learn lessons, others don't. A few nursery rhymes can occasionally contain questionable representations, like "Ten Little Indians" of the counting song. 

Violence & Scariness

Arguing and conflict serves a social-emotional lesson in some of this channel's content, such as the BabyRiki series. A typical message: it's better to be polite than to fight, and more positive ways of interacting are demonstrated. Nursery rhymes can contain mildly violent imagery, like "Jack and Jill" where two kids fall down a hill and then are seen wrapped in bandages, recuperating. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Some videos begin or end with imagery that encourages viewers to watch more: an animated child is shown clicking on a LooLoo Kids video on a tablet; a baby capers around the screen demonstrating gameshow-style that there are other videos the viewer can click to watch. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that YouTube channel LooLoo Kids is intended for very young viewers and contains children's songs, sometimes grouped into hour-long song collections, and short episodes of a show. Songs are classic, and will be familiar to parents: "Rain, Rain, Go Away" and the like. They will also contain lyrics that some may find slightly disturbing, particularly when given visuals, as in "Jack and Jill" when the kids fall down the hill, get injured, and are then pictured recuperating in casts and bandages on their heads. Social-emotional lessons (like "being polite is best") and introductions to basic educational concepts (like "this is a triangle") show up in children's show BabyRiki, and any conflict serves to demonstrate that lesson, like when one character accidentally stomps another's sandcastles and then apologizes. Segments may appear before or after videos that encourage viewers to watch more, showing them how and where to click to see further videos. 

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What's the story?

YouTube channel LOOLOO KIDS is aimed at toddlers and preschoolers, with animated versions of classic children's nursery rhymes and songs, and episodes of BabyRiki, a children's show designed to teach social-emotional lessons and drive home basic educational concepts. Some videos contain a single song and are 3 minutes long or less; others collect many different types of songs (holiday songs, songs about animals) and are up to an hour in length. 

Is it any good?

Tailor-made to entertain toddlers and preschoolers while Mom and Dad get dinner on the table or until the plane lands, this easygoing YouTube channel airs little to alarm parents. The songs are classic ("Mary Had a Little Lamb," "Wheels on the Bus"), the animation gentle (monkeys, babies, lambs, kittens), and the social-emotional lessons are unambiguously positive (being polite makes people happy, cooperation makes for easier work). This is the kind of channel you can leave on for an unspecified length of time to mesmerize a small child while you do something nearby that requires two hands. 

You might not want to be too nearby though -- as is common in YouTube kids' channels, the songs are almost guaranteed to irritate parental ears, with bouncy synth melodies and affected child singers (or worse, adults trying to sound like children). Note that you can expect an international note in song choice, with some not-common-in-America selections like "The Incy Wincy Spider" and "Two Little Dickie Birds." LooLoo Kids' scripted show, BabyRiki, may be a better option if you're in earshot, voiced by actors with soothing English accents. You won't want your child to stay hypnotized for a whole day in front of a screen with this channel on, but for those moments when you need a bit of electronic babysitting, at least LooLoo Kids won't traumatize or market to your brood. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about which songs and rhymes kids most enjoy and why. Can you remember the words? Are there actions that correspond to the lyrics? Were the songs or rhymes on the LooLoo Kids channel new to you?

  • What are your family's rules about screen time? How do you monitor them? What are some of your kids' screen-free activities?

  • Songs with coordinating actions and hand gestures encourage activity while kids watch these episodes. Talk to your kids about why it's important to stay active. How does exercising help us stay healthy? What are some fun ways to stay active?

TV details

For kids who love YouTube

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