Million Dollar Money Drop



High-stakes game show is all about the money.

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Thanks to the two-player format, the game reinforces teamwork and -- even though it must be done in under 60 seconds -- critical thinking. That said, greed is a secondary value.

Positive role models

Couples who play the game well must work together to make difficult, high-stakes decisions. Those who don't run the risk of leaving the show empty-handed.

Not applicable

Some questions skirt the topic of sex or use the word "sex" -- for example, Sex and the City.


Occasional use of words like "hell."


Questions might mention specific brands, including "Cheerios," "Nike," etc.

Drinking, drugs, & smoking
Not applicable

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that money -- literal piles of it -- is an important player in this high-stakes game show that asks contestants to bet bundles of cash on the right answers to multiple-choice questions. The two-player format reinforces teamwork and critical thinking, but with only 60 seconds to answer each question, it can feel more frantic than thoughtful. A few everyday brand names are mentioned, and there's some rare, low-level swearing (think "hell") in moments of excitement.

What's the story?

In MILLION DOLLAR MONEY DROP, punchy couples bet piles of money on the right answers to general-knowledge trivia questions, ranging from the most popular brand of breakfast cereal to the average number of shoes in a woman's closet. Each team starts out with $1 million in cash, and over the course of seven rounds, they must place the money in front of the correct multiple-choice answer to a given question. If they choose wisely, they get to keep the cash. But if they choose poorly, the money they bet on the wrong answer literally drops into a chute -- and out of their lives forever.

Is it any good?


As is the case with a lot of "original" programming these days, Million Dollar Money Drop was adapted from a hit British game show, The Million Pound Drop Live.
Thanks to exchange rates, the Brits actually stand to win more
cash. But America's upped the ante for players in true Yank style with a
supersized set and sleekly engineered drop chutes hooked up to
hydraulics that literally seem to suck the money out of sight.

At first, it's odd to imagine Kevin Pollak, who's best known for playing subtle sidekick roles in dramatic fare like A Few Good Men and The Usual Suspects, playing the role of a game show host. And, given Million Dollar Money Drop's extreme production values, it still kind of is ... although when you consider Pollak's stand-up comedy background and his stint as the host of Celebrity Poker Showdown -- and the fact that celebrity chef Guy Fieri can successfully host Minute to Win It -- it doesn't feel so wrong after all.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the show's format and the role that greed plays in a game like this. If you left with a mere $20,000 out of the $1 million you initially started with, would you still be satisfied? Why does starting out with so much cash make $20,000 seem like chump change?

  • What strategies do the most successful teams employ? Does it pay off to be a risk-taker, or is it better to play it safe? Do partners always get an equal say, or does one player tend to take charge?

  • How does this show compare to other TV game shows? (Hint: Think about lighting, music, format, etc.) Is it more or less extreme than a show like Deal or No Deal? Has the million-dollar prize become a game-show standard?

TV details

Cast:Kevin Pollak
Genre:Game Shows
TV rating:TV-PG

This review of Million Dollar Money Drop was written by

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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What parents and kids say

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Kid, 8 years old July 1, 2011

5 or 6+

quiz show for everyone
Kid, 10 years old April 18, 2011


This is a bad game show. I am not a fan AT ALL. Sometimes questions are sexual and sometimes the language isn't appropriate. It's really bad.
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Great role models
Teen, 15 years old Written byTchickenboybo3 February 18, 2011
its a boring game show!
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Great role models


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