Moving In

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Moving In TV Poster Image
Humiliating dating competition sends negative messages.

Parents say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series sends negative messages about what constitutes appropriate behavior when it comes to dating, relationships, and guiding teens during this process.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Parents willingly judge and choose a partner for their son or daughter after subjecting them to humiliating tasks. Parents sometimes insult their son or daughter’s suitor. Suitors are sometimes disrespectful to the parents.

Violence

Parents and suitors sometimes yell at each other and there is some quasi-violence, like an older adult wrestling with a young suitor. One episode features a parent tying the rivaling suitors’ legs together to keep them from escaping the home.

Sex

Contains some sexual discussions that are sometimes crass. Admirers are lured to their girlfriend or boyfriend’s home with the promise of a romantic weekend alone together. Condoms and lubricants are occasionally visible.

Language

Words like “douche bag,” “piss,” and “ass” are audible and plentiful. Curses like “s--t” and “f--k” -- spoken by both parents and young adults -- are bleeped.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Cigarettes are occasionally visible.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this over-the-top dating reality series sends some negative messages about relationships and parenting. It contains some strong sexual innuendo and some sexual discussions (plus images of condoms and lubricant), plenty of strong language (“piss,” “hell,” “ass”; “f--k” and “s--t” are bleeped), and occasional images of cigarette cartons.

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What's the story?

MOVING IN features a young adult turning to his or her parents for help in deciding between two admirers. Each suitors is tricked into thinking that s/he are going to move in with their boyfriend or girlfriend for a romantic weekend. Upon arrival they discover that they are competing with one another for the same person. They also learn that they must spend the weekend living with that person’s parents. For two days they must live by their rules, and perform tasks designed to humiliate them. At the end of the weekend, the suitor who most impresses gets a key to their front door, while the other is banned from the house forever.

Is it any good?

The series offers a disturbing view of what some people consider appropriate behavior when it comes to dating and relationships. It also sends some questionable messages about how to appropriately guide young adults when faced with decisions about who to spend their time with.

Granted, some of the cast’s reactions appear a bit orchestrated for the cameras. It is also hard to believe that the individuals vying for the chance to stay with their significant other would put up with some of the antics featured here. If the show had a bit more humor, it would feel more like playful fun, but with all the arguing and quasi-violence, the show sometimes takes a bitter tone. The biggest question here is whether a person who must turn to their parents to make this kind of decision for them should really be dating at all.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about their guidelines for acceptable dating and relationship behavior. Is it appropriate to date two people at the same time without telling them? What kind of message are the parents on the show sending their teens about dating and relationships? Given some of the antics featured on the show, how real do you think this overall moving in experience really is?

TV details

  • Premiere date: October 29, 2010
  • Network: MTV
  • Genre: Reality TV
  • TV rating: TV-PG

For kids who love reality TV

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