Parents' Guide to

Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares (UK)

By Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media Reviewer

age 15+

More brutal insults from foul-mouthed UK chef.

Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares (UK) Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this TV show.

Community Reviews

age 16+

Based on 4 parent reviews

age 18+

BAD FOR KIDS!!!!!!!!

FEEDING DUCKS BREAD?! WHAT DO YOU THINK YOU'RE DOING NICKELODEON?!!!! MY KID USED TO LOVE PEPPA PIG UNTIL THIS SCENE AND WHENEVER IT COMES ON I WILL PUT A BLINDFOLD HIS FACE!!!!!!!!
age 12+

Too Much Swearing

Gordon raps up a stir with a lot of strong language and profanity IS NOT FOR KIDS.

Is It Any Good?

Our review:
Parents say (4 ):
Kids say (1 ):

Viewers familiar with Ramsay's fiery brand of criticism will expect nothing less than the brutal honesty he brings to his consulting gig; tensions rise quickly as he lashes out at everyone he feels is coming up short. No one's feelings are spared as Ramsay hurls red-letter insults for inefficiency, lack of skill, and sloppy work habits. But when he turns his efforts to teaching, he shows a bit more patience -- and it's here that his true expertise shows through. Ramsay helps owners simplify their business plan, honing in on a customer base and designing menu choices to match their needs. He teaches chefs how to cut costs and increase efficiency -- and, in some extreme cases, how to cook.

If you like your entertainment brimming with confrontation and tense moments, Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares is right up your alley; if not, you might want to pass. It feels more like a soap box from which the foul-mouthed chef can unleash his fury of insults and four-letter words than anything else, and by the end of each hour, the process of weeding through bleeps (which replace his favorite word, "f--k") to cobble together the actual dialogue becomes tiresome. There's so little actual substance here that there's no reason to think you'll be missing anything by turning it off.

TV Details

Did we miss something on diversity?

Research shows a connection between kids' healthy self-esteem and positive portrayals in media. That's why we've added a new "Diverse Representations" section to our reviews that will be rolling out on an ongoing basis. You can help us help kids by suggesting a diversity update.

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate