Redneck Rehab

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Redneck Rehab TV Poster Image
Reality comedy mixes stereotypes with positive messages.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

There's lots of stereotyping, but also positive messages about family and staying connected to your roots.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Folks sometimes appear as stereotypes of "rednecks" -- uneducated, crass, etc. -- but also on display is some strong family connections and people proud of their heritage.

Violence

Shotguns are visible during target practice, fishing, and hunting. Occasionally food fights and other mild brawls break out, but these are more funny than violent.

Sex

Occasionally crude references to genitals (like "nuts") are audible.

Language

Words like "damn," "hell," "ass," and "crap" are audible; curses like "s--t" and "f--k" are bleeped.

Consumerism

Labels for products like Mist and Dr. Pepper are visible, but not prominently featured. Ford and Dodge trucks are also visible.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (wine, beer, hard liquor) is visible. Beer is shown being shot out of toy guns.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Redneck Rehab is a humorous attempt to reacquaint folks with their country roots, and their friends and families. It contains some strong vocab ("crap," "ass," "hell"), bleeped curses ('s--t," "f--k"), and some crude sexual references. Dodge and Ford trucks, as well as various soda labels, are visible (but not discussed). The show contains lots of stereotypical references about people who enjoy a country heritage, but it also contains very strong and positive messages about the importance of family.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

REDNECK REHAB is a reality show featuring men and women who have turned their backs on their childhood country-style lifestyle and the friends and family members attempting to bring them back to their roots. Hosted by Tom Arnold, each episode features someone who has left his/her family, friends, and traditions behind for what they perceive to be a more urban or classier lifestyle. After being tricked into an intervention, the wayward city slicker is invited to spend 48 hours with their family and friends enjoying some of their old redneck traditions, like hanging out in trailer parks, playing mud volleyball, and fishing with shotguns. It gets a little crazy, but it is hoped that the time together helps them realize that despite their differences, they are bound together by love.

Is it any good?

Redneck Rehab features all the expected stereotypes that one comes to expect from shows that highlight the "redneck" lifestyle. Some of the activities, (like filling up the back of a pickup truck with water to create a makeshift spa), seem pretty contrived, too.

But underneath all the over-the-top behavior are very definite statements about the importance of family. It also highlights the importance of being proud of your cultural heritage, even if you have chosen to pursue other interests and/or lifestyles outside of it. It might not be for everyone, but if you choose to watch Redneck Rehab, you'll find some very positive messages here.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the term "redneck."  What are some of the stereotypes that this term represents? Do TV shows that use and/or celebrate the term reinforce or diffuse these generalizations?

  • Why do you think these folks agreed to be on TV? What do they stand to gain or lose?

TV details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love reality shows

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate