Take It All

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Take It All TV Poster Image
Game show features pricey prizes, some tricky behavior.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

Not yet rated

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive messages

It's fun, but the show's focus is on winning expensive prizes. Contestants share stories of struggles and financial need to explain why they deserve to win, and sometimes they lie to convince people they deserve prizes.

Positive role models & representations

Players pretend to want to keep prizes and/or lie about what they'll do in order to outsmart other players.

Violence
Sex

Contestants sometimes make comments about being single, but nothing really sexual.

Language

Words like "hell" are sometimes heard.

Consumerism

Brands and services like Miller Lite, Molly Maids Cleaning services, GE appliances, Smart Cars, etc. are awarded as prizes.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

Beer and other alcoholic beverages are sometimes part of a prize package.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that in the game show Take It All, contestants attempt to take valuable prizes from their competitors in order to win. It's pretty mild, but contestants will often lie in order to convince people to give up their prizes and/or to win the game. Prizes include product and service brands like Miller Lite, Molly Maids, and GE.

User Reviews

Educator Written byJared Galczynski May 20, 2014

Take It All Away (The Lies, Common Sense Media!)

I watched all 6 episodes of this show and I actually liked it. But maybe too much consumerism.
Adult Written bymousecake July 30, 2013

Stay Far, FAR Away from this one!

Just...stay far far away. This show seems harmless and first but the last bit will leave most with bitterness in their mouths and sadness in their hearts. It sa... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Contestants on game show TAKE IT ALL -- which is hosted by Howie Mandel -- select and open prizes ranging from luxury cars and jewelry to dream vacations and VIP experiences. As each of the five players joins the game, they have the option of either stealing a prize already opened by a previous contestant or opening a new prize to see if it's more valuable.Those who want to keep a prize from being taken can lock it in, but they leave themselves open to having more expensive prizes taken from them later on. The person who has the lowest-valued prize at the end of each round is eliminated. The two players left in the final round must try to decide whether they're going to try to keep the individual prizes they have or take it all. If both players secretly decide to keep their own prizes, they each get to keep them. If only one of them decides to take it all, s/he who makes that decision gets to keep everything. But if both contestants decide to take it all, both of them go home empty-handed.

Is it any good?

Take It All is modeled after holiday gift/white elephant exchange games in which people choose gifts and trade them in an attempt to get something they really want. But unlike these party games, the idea of winning expensive gifts gives Take It All some edge and heightens some of the contestants' emotional responses.

Viewers may enjoy trying to pick and choose which prizes are worth more than others. The show's online interactive features may also be potentially appealing. But some may find a few of the final contestants' attempts to con people into trusting them by lying or telling emotional stories -- in order to get them to make the wrong choice -- a little disturbing. Still, if you're a game show fan, chances are that you'll enjoy the tension created by this high-stakes game.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why people compete on game shows. Is it really to win prizes? Or is it to be on TV?

  • Do you think it's OK to lie in order to win prizes and/or outsmart contestants?

TV details

For kids who love humor and competition

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate