iEmily

Website review by
Susan Yudt, Common Sense Media
iEmily Website Poster Image
Girls who get over stale design will find smart health info.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages

The site includes positive messages about staying healthy, resisting peer pressure, making smart choices, and other important issues.

Violence

Some of the articles and first-person stories discuss abuse and sexual assault.

Sex

The site covers the basics of sexual health, including anatomy, pregnancy options, birth control, STDs, and sexual orientation.

Language

No profanity.

Consumerism

There's no advertising on the site.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The site includes information on the dangers of drinking, drugs, and smoking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that iEmily is a site for teen and preteen girls offering information and resources on many different health topics. There's a section on sexual health, and the site touches on heavier issues like abuse, rape, and self-injury. There's also content on nutrition, fitness, skin care, and other topics of interest to a younger audience.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 10 years old November 6, 2011

Perfecto

I think its really good for GIRLS entering puberty. The reason Im emphsizing the word girls is becuase I know about the sickos of this words, aahem all the boys... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bytwilightluv101 December 17, 2011

educational

very educational its good for girls who dont no whats going on with their bodies :P

Is it any good?

Teens and preteens who are used to sophisticated sites with sleek design and lots of interactive features might find IEMILY a bit basic. The site was launched in 2000, and it still has the look and feel of that era. On the plus side, iEmily has hundreds of articles on topics ranging from healthy recipes to feng shui to hiccups, so there's no shortage of reading material.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Every family has different opinions on the best approach to discussing sex and sexual health. Talk about your values and expectations when it comes to sex. Some teens are afraid to talk to their parents about sex. Would your teens feel comfortable approaching you if they had a question or concern? Why or why not?

  • Discuss how the media may impact your teen's health, especially relating to body image and sex. Read Common Sense Media's Sex and Media Tips and Diet Messages and Unhealthy Bodies.

Website details

For kids who love to learn

Our editors recommend

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